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Engines of the Mind: The Evolution of the Computer from Mainframes to Microprocessors

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When John Mauchly and Presper Eckert developed the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) at the University of Pennsylvania during World War II, their intention was to aid artillerymen in aiming their guns. Since then, in the past fifty years, ENIAC and its offspring have changed the way we go about both business and science. Along with the transistor, the co When John Mauchly and Presper Eckert developed the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) at the University of Pennsylvania during World War II, their intention was to aid artillerymen in aiming their guns. Since then, in the past fifty years, ENIAC and its offspring have changed the way we go about both business and science. Along with the transistor, the computer has brought about transformation on a scale unmatched since the industrial revolution. Now, in a lively and evenhanded account, Joel Shurkin introduces us to the often-feuding players and the discoveries that made the computer possible-from the first models to the creation of the chip and beyond. Here is the first full account of an invention that changed the world. For this new paperback edition, Shurkin has added an epilogue and a new chapter on the latest milestones in the ongoing computer revolution.


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When John Mauchly and Presper Eckert developed the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) at the University of Pennsylvania during World War II, their intention was to aid artillerymen in aiming their guns. Since then, in the past fifty years, ENIAC and its offspring have changed the way we go about both business and science. Along with the transistor, the co When John Mauchly and Presper Eckert developed the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) at the University of Pennsylvania during World War II, their intention was to aid artillerymen in aiming their guns. Since then, in the past fifty years, ENIAC and its offspring have changed the way we go about both business and science. Along with the transistor, the computer has brought about transformation on a scale unmatched since the industrial revolution. Now, in a lively and evenhanded account, Joel Shurkin introduces us to the often-feuding players and the discoveries that made the computer possible-from the first models to the creation of the chip and beyond. Here is the first full account of an invention that changed the world. For this new paperback edition, Shurkin has added an epilogue and a new chapter on the latest milestones in the ongoing computer revolution.

30 review for Engines of the Mind: The Evolution of the Computer from Mainframes to Microprocessors

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Smith

    If you're looking for a simplified overview of computer development and it's founding scientists works and a really in depth view of egos within the computing world, look no further than here! The title and back plate of the book is a little more than a bit misleading about what this book is about. it's not so much about computers as it is about conspiracy, pride, and telling the story from a few of a select few early computer scientists and engineers. I wasn't impressed, but I can't say I didn' If you're looking for a simplified overview of computer development and it's founding scientists works and a really in depth view of egos within the computing world, look no further than here! The title and back plate of the book is a little more than a bit misleading about what this book is about. it's not so much about computers as it is about conspiracy, pride, and telling the story from a few of a select few early computer scientists and engineers. I wasn't impressed, but I can't say I didn't learn anything either.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Really enjoyed this book. I ought to read it again to refresh my memory on all the great stories.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Rudge

    I'm an ECE, so I'm a bit biased, but....... the development of computational, and general computational devices is probably the most underrated piece of history if measured by impact on society. The names and places are interesting to hear about, but I think the bread and butter of this book is why computation was needed. I wish it would have dug a little deeper into the hardware details. I'm an ECE, so I'm a bit biased, but....... the development of computational, and general computational devices is probably the most underrated piece of history if measured by impact on society. The names and places are interesting to hear about, but I think the bread and butter of this book is why computation was needed. I wish it would have dug a little deeper into the hardware details.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  5. 5 out of 5

    Miguel De León

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ana Duarte

  7. 5 out of 5

    Russ

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ed Terrell

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nikolin

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hsu

  11. 4 out of 5

    Benedict Disuanco

  12. 5 out of 5

    B.B.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nathalie Nareau

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susanmt

  16. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

  17. 5 out of 5

    M.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nawar Youssef

  19. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Mcfarland

  20. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shoomg

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Furr

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gamoia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Philip Hollenback

  25. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Foushee

  27. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Biddle

  29. 4 out of 5

    William Blair

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ute

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