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The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook: Dine like Draper and Drink like Sterling: Recipes to Satisfy a Mad Men Appetite

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UNOFFICIAL AND UNAUTHORIZED The appeal of AMC's award-winning period drama Mad Men, shortly to begin its fifth season, lies as much in its painstaking portrait of 1960s America as in the emotional lives of its characters. In The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook, Judy Gelman and Peter Zheutlin explore the show's culinary backdrop, from the food we see on the table at Sterling UNOFFICIAL AND UNAUTHORIZED The appeal of AMC's award-winning period drama Mad Men, shortly to begin its fifth season, lies as much in its painstaking portrait of 1960s America as in the emotional lives of its characters. In The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook, Judy Gelman and Peter Zheutlin explore the show's culinary backdrop, from the food we see on the table at Sterling Cooper power lunches to the dishes Betty serves at Draper dinner parties. With more than 60 recipes, photos, and other images all drawn from the period in which Mad Men is set, The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook is perfect for appreciating the role food and drink play in the hit series or for throwing your own historically accurate Mad Men-inspired cocktail party.* Find out why Betty might have chosen her "Around the World" dinner party theme&emdash;plus why Don’s Heineken ad campaign would have been so well-received by the public&emdash;and try a gazpacho from Spain, using a recipe Betty herself might have.*Learn why Sardi’s, the restaurant where Bobbi Barret and Don celebrate selling her husband’s new pilot, was a likely location for post-TV deal celebration, and make Sardi's famous steak tartar for yourself.Includes a color photo insert of 16 dishes, plus additional black and white photos and other images of bars, restaurants, and food advertisements from the 1960s.


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UNOFFICIAL AND UNAUTHORIZED The appeal of AMC's award-winning period drama Mad Men, shortly to begin its fifth season, lies as much in its painstaking portrait of 1960s America as in the emotional lives of its characters. In The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook, Judy Gelman and Peter Zheutlin explore the show's culinary backdrop, from the food we see on the table at Sterling UNOFFICIAL AND UNAUTHORIZED The appeal of AMC's award-winning period drama Mad Men, shortly to begin its fifth season, lies as much in its painstaking portrait of 1960s America as in the emotional lives of its characters. In The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook, Judy Gelman and Peter Zheutlin explore the show's culinary backdrop, from the food we see on the table at Sterling Cooper power lunches to the dishes Betty serves at Draper dinner parties. With more than 60 recipes, photos, and other images all drawn from the period in which Mad Men is set, The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook is perfect for appreciating the role food and drink play in the hit series or for throwing your own historically accurate Mad Men-inspired cocktail party.* Find out why Betty might have chosen her "Around the World" dinner party theme&emdash;plus why Don’s Heineken ad campaign would have been so well-received by the public&emdash;and try a gazpacho from Spain, using a recipe Betty herself might have.*Learn why Sardi’s, the restaurant where Bobbi Barret and Don celebrate selling her husband’s new pilot, was a likely location for post-TV deal celebration, and make Sardi's famous steak tartar for yourself.Includes a color photo insert of 16 dishes, plus additional black and white photos and other images of bars, restaurants, and food advertisements from the 1960s.

30 review for The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook: Dine like Draper and Drink like Sterling: Recipes to Satisfy a Mad Men Appetite

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    I never read a cookbook cover to cover. My rationale with cookbooks is to flip through – pictures? Good. Lots of pictures? Great. A variety of recipes? Very good. Lots of caviar and truffles and other ingredients I couldn't bring myself to buy even if I could afford them? No thanks. And then if I buy the book it will go on a shelf until I need a recipe from it; if I agree to review a book (as I did with this from Netgalley) I will page through it to form an intelligent opinion of the layout and I never read a cookbook cover to cover. My rationale with cookbooks is to flip through – pictures? Good. Lots of pictures? Great. A variety of recipes? Very good. Lots of caviar and truffles and other ingredients I couldn't bring myself to buy even if I could afford them? No thanks. And then if I buy the book it will go on a shelf until I need a recipe from it; if I agree to review a book (as I did with this from Netgalley) I will page through it to form an intelligent opinion of the layout and the clarity, maybe make a couple of the dishes listed, and move on. But I opened The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook, and started reading the forward, and just kept going. It was just that much fun. Each recipe is fronted by a short piece telling why it's in there – like Betty Draper's Around the World dinner, which prompted the inclusion of the gazpacho. There's also a recipe for a roast chicken like the one Pete Campbell threw out the window. It was like watching a recap of the show from its beginning – did I already use "fun"? Well, and I'll probably use it again. The simple fact that about the first thirty percent of the book is devoted to cocktails is brilliant. I tend to doubt I'll ever be making any of them, but it was just … sorry, can't help it, it was fun wandering through the stories of the authors' search for a martini fit for Roger Sterling and just the right Old Fashioned to suit Don Draper. And thirty percent – that's just about right. I also enjoy a book – cookbook or otherwise – with a sense of humor. That there is a wonderful sense of fun about this book should be obvious from that massive cocktail section, but it's all through it. That birthday dinner Peggy's boyfriend arranged for her, which she never made it to? There's a recipe for what she might have been served – along with a lovely little synopsis of the restaurant where the boyfriend (et al) waited for her (and waited). And the warning not to wait dinner for Peggy, because she probably won't show. The authors include very nice little histories of where they obtained each recipe. As often as possible, they went back to the source - the restaurant where the character ate or might have eaten the dish - or drunk the cocktail. It seems they had a wonderful amount of cooperation from the professionals contacted - and why not? It's a perfect marriage, this union of food and Mad Men. (AMC, you really should get in on this.) This is a good cookbook: there are lots of fine recipes, some of which are – cleverly – given twice, once just as might have been served to the Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce folk in the 60's and once as they would be served today. I can see myself cooking from this. But more – this is a good book. The people who put this together, Judy Gelman & Peter Zheutlin, know food, and they know Mad Men, and they love both – and those are (pardon the metaphor) ingredients for an entertaining, enjoyable (fun) book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette Johnson

    This was insightful and interesting. More of a historical piece than a cookbook. I have not seen Mad Men but I do love the time period and the classy elegance of it. The book was perfectly descriptive in this manner and one could see themselves in that role. This would be a fantastic reference if you were going to throw a party in this time period. I appreciated the research needed to find just the right recipes to portray the refinement and sophistication of the era.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This looks like a novelty cookbook, but it's a good history of mid-century food and restaurants that includes recipes that might have been used by the characters of Mad Men. The authors noted what was eaten in a given episode and then found a recipe from a period cookbook or from the restaurant, if it still exists, where the meal took place. There are are two Waldorf Salad recipes from the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel (owned by Conrad Hilton, whose character appeared on the show), one from the 1960s wh This looks like a novelty cookbook, but it's a good history of mid-century food and restaurants that includes recipes that might have been used by the characters of Mad Men. The authors noted what was eaten in a given episode and then found a recipe from a period cookbook or from the restaurant, if it still exists, where the meal took place. There are are two Waldorf Salad recipes from the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel (owned by Conrad Hilton, whose character appeared on the show), one from the 1960s when it was just celery, apples, and mayonnaise, as well as their current recipe, a monstrosity that includes truffles. As an aside, the definitive Waldorf Salad recipe is courtesy of the angry American from Fawlty Towers. Basil: Chef's forgotten already. Uh, walnuts, cheese? Mr. Hamilton: No! No cheese! It's celery, apples, walnuts, grapes! Basil: Right! Mr. Hamilton: In mayonnaise! Basil: Right! Now, come on! There's an episode where Betty's father, in the early stages of dementia, peels several potatoes early in the morning, believing he's on KP duty. By that evening, Carla, the Draper's Black housekeeper, has turned it into potato salad, so for Carla's recipe, the authors turned to the Ebony Magazine cookbook, published in 1948, and the savory recipe is most definitely not Karen's potato salad. Other historical gems are Pat Nixon's Date Nut Bread, Chicken Kiev from the Russian Tea Room, and a large cocktail section that includes Don's Old Fashioned and the contested history of the Mai Tai. Recommended both for fans of the show and people who are nostalgic for things like Corned Beef Hash and Turkey Tetrazzini.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    Fun and quick read. It's interesting that someone would watch the series again under the filter of what characters ate & drank. I mean, it was integral to the series and was noticed by myself, but these authors got very precise. As someone who is fascinated by retro recipes, famous old restaurants, and nostalgia in general, I really enjoyed this. The only criticism is that it seemed to only go through Season 4. I would love to see a complete version of this. Fun and quick read. It's interesting that someone would watch the series again under the filter of what characters ate & drank. I mean, it was integral to the series and was noticed by myself, but these authors got very precise. As someone who is fascinated by retro recipes, famous old restaurants, and nostalgia in general, I really enjoyed this. The only criticism is that it seemed to only go through Season 4. I would love to see a complete version of this.

  5. 5 out of 5

    dust

    I received a free ebook copy of this from Netgalley. First things first: I was instantly impressed with the dedication that the editors seemed to show, for this cookbook. The introduction tells us that the goal was to create it as true to the time period as possible, including digging up the older versions of recipes from restaurants seen in show. They didn't satisfy themselves with just getting the recipes, they made sure they were historically accurate. As someone who is at times disappointed b I received a free ebook copy of this from Netgalley. First things first: I was instantly impressed with the dedication that the editors seemed to show, for this cookbook. The introduction tells us that the goal was to create it as true to the time period as possible, including digging up the older versions of recipes from restaurants seen in show. They didn't satisfy themselves with just getting the recipes, they made sure they were historically accurate. As someone who is at times disappointed by a lack of historical research in fiction, I was delighted to see an unofficial cookbook for a TV show doing it. And really, it's perfect considering the pains that the show's creators go to for the same reasons: faithfulness to the time period. At times this cookbook is almost more of a history book than a book full of recipes, and I have to say that I love that. As a history aficionado, it really appealed to me, and so I can definitely say this book isn't just for fans (though of course they will have a very particular appreciation). It includes little bits of history about specific drinks, trends, and changes. The etymology of some items are traced. The photography is not only crisp and clean, but speaks more of a history book once again-- including both photos for the recipes but also historical snapshots related to the time period, both of the original servings and of the people and places connected to them. The recipes are elegant and classy, all in all. Caviar and steak tartar and cocktails galore. What impressed me most was the great variety that the recipes provided. There were a lot of recipes I wanted to try right off the bat, and all had a sort of professional quality to the recipes themselves. Suffice it to say that I suddenly have the urge to throw a 60's themed cocktail party.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Please Pass the Books

    The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook: Inside the Kitchens, Bars, and Restaurants of Mad Men is an unauthorized compilation of recipes for the ultimate Mad Men fan. Pulled from other cookbooks of the era, each cocktail, appetizer, salad, main course, and dessert featured has a prologue with a Mad Men reference and a bit of history. If you are looking for a fun gift for a Mad Men fanatic, this little gimmick will do the trick. I'd wrap this book up with a set of martini glasses and stir sticks and call The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook: Inside the Kitchens, Bars, and Restaurants of Mad Men is an unauthorized compilation of recipes for the ultimate Mad Men fan. Pulled from other cookbooks of the era, each cocktail, appetizer, salad, main course, and dessert featured has a prologue with a Mad Men reference and a bit of history. If you are looking for a fun gift for a Mad Men fanatic, this little gimmick will do the trick. I'd wrap this book up with a set of martini glasses and stir sticks and call it a day. However, if you are looking for excellent recipes for a period themed party or just to whip something up, I'd look elsewhere. Without the accompaniment of the Mad Men prologues, the recipes themselves are pretty lackluster. A pack of onion soup and two cups of sour cream (the same recipe on the side of a Lipton box) is actually in there. It's cute and, frankly, has always been my favorite dip—but if I'm honest, I would never use this book for any actual cooking. Devoid of the traditional photographs of finished and cooked recipes, it misses the mark there. What it does have are fun pictures of Mad Men themed products, places, and period ingredients. And so, with it coming in at under $13 for a paperback copy, I would absolutely recommend this as a gift for any Mad Men enthusiast. I'd like to thank Net Galley and the publisher Smart Pop, who furnished an ARC of this book for my honest opinion, which this certainly is.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jana Perskie

    "Chop Suey" is a gem of a book which gives the reader a fascinating glimpse of the history, politics, and cuisine of two widely disparate countries, China, (The Middle Kingdom), and the U.S. This volume just came out in bookstores today, July 16, and I really hope it receives the consideration it deserves. American trade with the Middle Kingdom began in February 1784, when the ship, "Empress of China," captained by John Green, set sail from New York on a previously uncharted course - the only gu "Chop Suey" is a gem of a book which gives the reader a fascinating glimpse of the history, politics, and cuisine of two widely disparate countries, China, (The Middle Kingdom), and the U.S. This volume just came out in bookstores today, July 16, and I really hope it receives the consideration it deserves. American trade with the Middle Kingdom began in February 1784, when the ship, "Empress of China," captained by John Green, set sail from New York on a previously uncharted course - the only guide being a British pilot's manual. On August 23 of the same year, the ship arrived in Guangdong Province, at the mouth of the Pearl River in southeast China. In her hold were barrels which carried almost "$20,000 in Spanish silver and thirty tons of dried ginseng root from the mountains of Pennsylvania and Virginia." (Who knew that the U.S. originally sold ginseng to the Chinese)? The ship, after passing customs, sailed for the city of Guangzhou, also known as Canton, and finally docked at Whampoa, where French, Danish and English boats were also in port. I was intrigued that Captain Green carried copies of the articles of peace and the treaties between Great Britain and various other European powers for those ashore who were not informed of the end of the U.S. War of Independence. Samuel Shaw, a ship's officer, was the "Empress's" business agent and the second most important passenger after the captain. The periwigged Americans met with the silk-robed Chinese at "factories," buildings on the wharf where business and trade were conducted. A "pidgin" language was developed to communicate. Not surprisingly, the Chinese had difficulty distinguishing between the British and the Americans. The foreigners were never allowed to enter the city, even after their four months stay. When the "Empress of China" returned to the United Stated, "Shaw reported about the venture to John Jay, U.S. Secretary of Foreign Affairs." Shaw appeared, from his reports, to have little interest in Chinese culture - but then the Americans never saw more of that country than the dockside factories. And Shaw's primary concern was selling ginseng and turning a profit. When the Americans dined with the Chinese trading representatives, European food was usually served, although prepared by Chinese cooks. When the evening's menu was Chinese, banquet style, the Americans found the new cuisine to be odd and almost unpalatable. "They not only use the same kind of flesh, fish and fowl that we do, but even horse flesh is esteemed proper food." The use of chopsticks proved unwieldy and the prevalence of rice in the diet seemed curious. "Nor do they reckon dogs, cats, snakes, frogs, or indeed any kind of vermin unwholesome diet." The food was described as "insipid and stinking of garlic, onion and rancid oil." On the other hand, the Chinese were disgusted by the American diet. They thought the fish dishes had a taste which had "no resemblance to the living fish at all." They were revolted that meat was served "half raw, or floating in a liquid gravy." One Chinese merchant wrote, "Really, it was not until I beheld this sight that I became convinced of what I had often heard, that the ferocious disposition of these demons arises from their indulgence in such gross food." The meticulous Chinese were also horrified at the American's habit of tossing table scraps to snappish dogs who were allowed to "roam amongst one's legs!!" And so the era of trade with China was inaugurated. Before the Revolutionary War, Americans were dependent upon the British to supply their highly taxed tea. Now, they could buy tea directly from the Chinese along with delicate porcelain cups to drink it from. Almost two centuries later, Chinese dishes, like chop suey - which consists of small pieces of meat, chicken or shrimp stir-fried with celery, onions, bean sprouts, water chestnuts, mushrooms, and vegetables, served over rice, usually with soy sauce - became a real treat in the U.S. I remember eating at Chinese restaurants as a child and ordering chop suey. I would like to think my palate has developed considerably since then. Chop suey is thought to be of Chinese-American origin - a dish designed to suit the Western palate. It was created, supposedly, in the mid to late 19th century by Chinese laborers working on the U.S. transcontinental railroad, and Chinese immigrants in San Francisco. Lem Sen, a Chinese cook who came to New York from California, claimed to have invented the recipe himself in San Francisco. More recent information suggests that the chop suey originated in Taishan, a district of Guangdong Province which was the home of most of the early Chinese immigrants. The author also explains what birds' nest soup is, a real Chinese delicacy which I have never wanted to try. Mr. Coes description makes the soup sound so delicious that perhaps I will order it on my next trip to Chinatown. Another interesting historical tidbit, which illustrates where the people of the Middle Kingdom thought the Americans, English, etc., stood in the human pecking order was the Chinese division of the world into a "series of five concentric circles, based on an ancient plan ascribed to the legendary Yu Emperor." "First came the royal domains, meaning all the lands within the borders of China directly ruled by the emperor. All Chinese, by definition, were civilized. The core of these domains was what Westerners called China Proper"...."Just beyond China's borders lay the lands of the tributary royal princes; the kingdoms of Korea, Laos, Vietnam, Tibet, Mongolia, etc." These principalities, intimidated by the Chinese behemoth next door, accepted Chinese supremacy and regularly paid costly tributes to the emperor. "Beyond these tributary kingdoms lay the zone of pacification, where the peoples were in the process of adopting Chinese civilization." "The rest of the world was encompassed by the outer two circles of the Yu Emperor's map, called the zone of 'allied barbarians,' and the zone of 'cultureless savagery.'" So, I guess we were the "allied barbarians!" This relatively small book, (251 pages), is chock full of information, not only about food, but about the Chinese immigration history, the Boxer Rebellion, various Chinese dynasties, and the Nixon and Kissenger visits, (imagine the wonderous foods they were served)! One would think that a history which covers so much territory would be weighty and slow to read and digest. On the contrary, I found "Chop Suey to be a fast-paced well written narrative - a most unusual book. Although many different cultures have come together in this melting pot of a nation, and many books have been written about similar cultural and culinary interchanges, (Italian, Jewish, Irish, Japanese, etc.), what makes "Chop Suey' stand out is the way the author highlights so much more than cuisine. He sprinkles unusual historical information and little known lore throughout. Andrew Coe has written for Saveur, Gastronomica, and the New York Times, is a coauthor of "Foie Gras: A Passion," and has contributed to the Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink. He has dined at Chinese restaurants around the world and lives in Brooklyn, New York. I highly recommend "Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States." Jana Perskie

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nici Writes

    This is another one of those cookbooks that I haven’t actually made any recipes from, but I adore reading it all the same. I absolutely love that each recipe comes with a preamble, not only about where it comes from in the show, but also some history about the recipe itself. Perhaps the one downside of this book is that there aren’t many illustrations or photographs, and I understand it’s an unofficial book, but it would have been really fun to see some of the scenes where the dishes feature in t This is another one of those cookbooks that I haven’t actually made any recipes from, but I adore reading it all the same. I absolutely love that each recipe comes with a preamble, not only about where it comes from in the show, but also some history about the recipe itself. Perhaps the one downside of this book is that there aren’t many illustrations or photographs, and I understand it’s an unofficial book, but it would have been really fun to see some of the scenes where the dishes feature in the show. The cocktails and dishes that feature in this book really invoke that sense of the 1960s. There aren’t too many fancy ingredients and most of the recipes are incredibly simple. If you’re having a 1960s or Mad Men themed party, this would be the perfect companion to creating an authentic dining experience for your guests. This isn’t just a book of recipes it’s a downright good read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A walk through the past with some recipes we may have forgotten. I have to say that I enjoyed the photos and some of the stories of the places that were used for reference.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    A bit of a strange book, to be sure, that is probably aimed at the ultra-obsessive "Mad Men" fan. A promised look inside the various kitchens, bars and restaurants that featured in a (popular?) American television series. The book describes best its raison d'être: "To ensure an authentic Mad Men experience, every recipe is introduced through a specific scene in the show. And to enhance your enjoyment of the food and drink we scoured period cookbooks and magazines for tips on throwing a successful A bit of a strange book, to be sure, that is probably aimed at the ultra-obsessive "Mad Men" fan. A promised look inside the various kitchens, bars and restaurants that featured in a (popular?) American television series. The book describes best its raison d'être: "To ensure an authentic Mad Men experience, every recipe is introduced through a specific scene in the show. And to enhance your enjoyment of the food and drink we scoured period cookbooks and magazines for tips on throwing a successful cocktail or dinner party." OK… So what do you really get? Essentially recipes taken from back-in-time. Nothing more, nothing less. Oh, but it is wrapped up with elements from the television series. Does it work? To someone who has never seen the series it just looks like a poor attempt to shoehorn some recipes into a book. To a devoted fan? Maybe it is different. You might enjoy the references to the series, might find additional inferences and links of benefit and maybe even enjoy recreating a meal or drink from a favourite scene. If you are looking JUST for classic old recipes, perhaps for a dinner party, there are many many great books out there to help you achieve your aims. This book is probably not one of them. This might sound unfair but the additional packaging just gets in the way of it being a good recipe book that could fulfil a need. As a composite (unofficial) tie-in to a television programme it might be a totally different proposition. Certainly there appears to be a lot of tie-in material that could appeal to hardcore fans. But to the passive viewer or even a non-viewer, sorry it doesn't work. There is not even a significant amount of period information that could drip into the reader's consciousness through osmosis either to make it an interesting curio. So a mixed bag. OK the price is not so high and undoubtedly it will be available for a much lower price if you look around hard enough. If you see it in a bookstore it might be worth a browse but you might need to adjust your expectations accordingly. Unless you are a die-hard fan, don't buy this book blind.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    "Dine like Draper and Drink like Sterling," reads the back cover of The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook, Inside the Kitchen, Bars and Restaurants of Mad Men, by Gelman and Zheutlin and published by SmartPop. The 70 recipes are inspired by specific Mad Men episodes and offer a culinary trip to the 1960s. Recipes were culled from vintage cookbooks and magazines and were kitchen tested. Recipes include cocktails, appetizers, salads, main courses, desert and sweets. My childhood family gatherings always "Dine like Draper and Drink like Sterling," reads the back cover of The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook, Inside the Kitchen, Bars and Restaurants of Mad Men, by Gelman and Zheutlin and published by SmartPop. The 70 recipes are inspired by specific Mad Men episodes and offer a culinary trip to the 1960s. Recipes were culled from vintage cookbooks and magazines and were kitchen tested. Recipes include cocktails, appetizers, salads, main courses, desert and sweets. My childhood family gatherings always featured Whiskey Sours. One year I had a cold and was given a sip; it was supposed to help. It was the last Whiskey Sour I ever drank, but here is the recipe from the book (Season 4. Episode 10): Whiskey Sour from Playboy Host & Bar Book by Thomas Mario 2 ounces blended whiskey 3/4 ounce lemon juice 1 teaspoon sugar 1/2 lemon slice 1 maraschino cheery (optional) 1. Add whiskey, lemon juice, and sugar to ice in a cocktail shaker and shake well. 1. Strain into prechilled glass. Garnish with lemon slice and cherry, if desired. Mom made a Wedge Salad. (As a kid I never ate her salads; I didn't like her dressing made with half catsup and half Miracle Whip, or the Iceberg lettuce.) The Palm's Wedge Salad (Season 3, Episode 2) is almost like Mom's: Wedge Salad 2 Iceberg lettuce hearts, quartered and cored 1 large ripe Beefsteak tomato, sliced Crumbled bacon to taste (added to original recipe per Roger's preference) 3/4-1 cup Blue Cheese Dressing 1. Place w iceberg wedges on each of 4 chilled salad plates 1. Top with bacon, place slices of tomato alongside. Serve with dressing on the side It is fun to read this book even without cooking, but I do look forward to trying some of these recipes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tina Culbertson

    If you have ever watched Mad Men and are a fan – this is a great book. It has stories as well as recipes. Every time we watched this show I wanted a martini and my husband wanted an Old fashioned. We still haven’t seen the final episodes of this series, waiting on Netflicks, but that didn’t keep me from enjoying this book. There are recipes for so many good drinks: Old Fashions, martinis, Manhattans, Mimosas and more. Food too! Oysters Rockefeller, crown rib roast, turkey tetrazzini, pineapple upsi If you have ever watched Mad Men and are a fan – this is a great book. It has stories as well as recipes. Every time we watched this show I wanted a martini and my husband wanted an Old fashioned. We still haven’t seen the final episodes of this series, waiting on Netflicks, but that didn’t keep me from enjoying this book. There are recipes for so many good drinks: Old Fashions, martinis, Manhattans, Mimosas and more. Food too! Oysters Rockefeller, crown rib roast, turkey tetrazzini, pineapple upside down cake……..you will love just flipping through the pages of this book. In addition to the many good recipes are stories about the television show and cultural context about the world in the 1960s. It definitely wasn’t a good era to be a woman in the workplace. But as I watched the show I was amazed at how spot on they got the set designs. Everything from the attire to the decorations – lamps, tables, the smoking and drinking in the office, the bar ware…all of it rang true. I am dating myself because yes, I grew up in the 60s. Well I was a child in the 1960s but I can’t tell you the number of times my husband and I would watch an episode and say, “Hey look, my grandmother had those tumblers or lamp” or whatever. Blast from the past here. Time to mix up a couple of Manhattans and listen to the Beatles. *I was lucky enough to win a copy of this book from Debra at Eliot’s Eats. Thank you, Debra! https://novelmeals.wordpress.com/2015...

  13. 4 out of 5

    erl

    I don't generally read cookbooks cover to cover, but this one was worth it. Every period detail is given, much like in Mad Men itself. I loved learning exactly what the characters were eating in all those posh restaurants, and which posh restaurants they were, exactly. The recipes are either from those legendary establishments or, in the case of home-cooked meals, from period cookbooks. True to the era, the food is prepared as it was then: the microwave is only mentioned once. I read this book l I don't generally read cookbooks cover to cover, but this one was worth it. Every period detail is given, much like in Mad Men itself. I loved learning exactly what the characters were eating in all those posh restaurants, and which posh restaurants they were, exactly. The recipes are either from those legendary establishments or, in the case of home-cooked meals, from period cookbooks. True to the era, the food is prepared as it was then: the microwave is only mentioned once. I read this book like a novel and I didn't cook from it. But most of the recipes seemed either run of the mill (another chocolate chip cookie recipe?) or bogged down in sixties cholesterol and canned goods. There are a few that seem worth trying. But all in all, I'm glad our attitudes toward food have changed, and we are no longer condemned to iceberg lettuce and canned vegetables, with a stick or two of butter in everything. The authors also include many priceless tidbits from period cookbooks and magazine articles on how to please your man through cooking. A fascinating little time capsule.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    This is a fun cookbook for Mad Men fans. It ties the recipes in with different episodes of the show. Most of the dishes are from cookbooks used in the '60's so there is definitely an authenticity with the period. There are also recipes from famous New York restaurants, many of which are still in existence, as well as photos of the restaurants dining rooms. Also included are some vintage ads for products used in cooking during that time. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that I wish the This is a fun cookbook for Mad Men fans. It ties the recipes in with different episodes of the show. Most of the dishes are from cookbooks used in the '60's so there is definitely an authenticity with the period. There are also recipes from famous New York restaurants, many of which are still in existence, as well as photos of the restaurants dining rooms. Also included are some vintage ads for products used in cooking during that time. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars is that I wish there had been more photos of the finished recipes. But, for the target audience, this cookbook offers up some cool '60's nostalgia.

  15. 5 out of 5

    m. ✨ On Hiatus ✨

    If you're a Mad Man fan, this will be a great book for you. It provides recipes for cocktails, appetizers, main courses and desserts from the 1960s. Each recipe is tied to a particular episode or scene from the show, and the author also gives a brief history of each item. Those who are not familiar with the show probably won't gain much of the kitschy, nostalgic enjoyment from the cookbooks that fans will, but I still think it's a fun and interesting book. I will definitely try out some of the r If you're a Mad Man fan, this will be a great book for you. It provides recipes for cocktails, appetizers, main courses and desserts from the 1960s. Each recipe is tied to a particular episode or scene from the show, and the author also gives a brief history of each item. Those who are not familiar with the show probably won't gain much of the kitschy, nostalgic enjoyment from the cookbooks that fans will, but I still think it's a fun and interesting book. I will definitely try out some of the recipes. A copy of this book was provided by the publisher, via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    If you love the cultural history of the US in the early sixties, you'll love this book. Although each entry references an episode of the TV series mad men, you don't need to have seen them to appreciate the book. Each recipe is prefaced by the history of a cocktail, appetizer, meal or restaurant that the characters either ate, drank or referenced in an episode and gives a well-researched description, history or anecdote. The "chapters" are breezy so you can read them leisurely one at a time, or If you love the cultural history of the US in the early sixties, you'll love this book. Although each entry references an episode of the TV series mad men, you don't need to have seen them to appreciate the book. Each recipe is prefaced by the history of a cocktail, appetizer, meal or restaurant that the characters either ate, drank or referenced in an episode and gives a well-researched description, history or anecdote. The "chapters" are breezy so you can read them leisurely one at a time, or tear through the whole thing in nothing flat.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    I agree with another reviewer that this book would be targeted towards the Mad Man show fan. In reviewing this book, I found it to be a simple regurgitation of common recipes from that period of time. Some of which are still popular today, but easily found. What I found to be most interesting to me was the clear research that the author did on the period of time and the photos surrounding the tidbits of information. In the end though, I am reviewing a cookbook, not a "trivia" book. Review copy pr I agree with another reviewer that this book would be targeted towards the Mad Man show fan. In reviewing this book, I found it to be a simple regurgitation of common recipes from that period of time. Some of which are still popular today, but easily found. What I found to be most interesting to me was the clear research that the author did on the period of time and the photos surrounding the tidbits of information. In the end though, I am reviewing a cookbook, not a "trivia" book. Review copy provided for honest review

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I have to admit that I did not watch one single episode of Mad Men. I do, however, love this cookbook inspired by the series. Many of the recipes are familiar to me having grown up in the 1960’s. They evoke an elegance of that time when folks dressed for dinner and families sat down together. This lovely collection has a great variety from cocktails to desserts. In addition there are wonder vintage photographs from that era and tie ins to the Mad Men series. Whether or not you were a fan of the I have to admit that I did not watch one single episode of Mad Men. I do, however, love this cookbook inspired by the series. Many of the recipes are familiar to me having grown up in the 1960’s. They evoke an elegance of that time when folks dressed for dinner and families sat down together. This lovely collection has a great variety from cocktails to desserts. In addition there are wonder vintage photographs from that era and tie ins to the Mad Men series. Whether or not you were a fan of the series, this book would be a great addition to any cookbook collection.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

    Each recipe in this Mad Men cookbook is related to or has appeared in an episode of Mad Men. The authors have included background info on each recipe. This made the book much more than a cookbook. It becomes a culinary history book. The details on the various cocktails featured was especially interesting and thorough.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter Bosson

    I received this book through Goodreads First Reads program. I great companion to the show. Full of great facts as well as wonderful recipes. I loved the way the recipes tie into specific moments from the show. Worth looking at even if you don't plan to ever cook any of the food, though I would hope that people would try out some of the quirky 60's dishes. I received this book through Goodreads First Reads program. I great companion to the show. Full of great facts as well as wonderful recipes. I loved the way the recipes tie into specific moments from the show. Worth looking at even if you don't plan to ever cook any of the food, though I would hope that people would try out some of the quirky 60's dishes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Reading through this cookbook makes you want to step back through time to enjoy dinner parties with friends and neighbors and to amazing everyone with your home bar tending pizazz! Now, the only thing left to do is to through a themed dinner party wit my favorite drinks and cocktails!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Sankey

    This is culinary time capsule of a world before microwaves, when sophisticated food was steak and creamed spinach, and Mai Tais were a window to the exotic world of the South Pacific accessible to jet setters.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    This is a great book for Mad Men fans. It has a lot of trivia regarding episodes, restaurants, food, and --my favorite--cocktails. Great gift idea for Mad Men fanatics and a fun way to indulge in your favorite show.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Lundberg

    Love how they not only give you the recipes, they tell you about their history and tie it in to the episodes I mad men. Very cool. Wish every recipe had a photo, my only complaint.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    So cool! Fun recipes of food shown on the show along with very cool tidbits of history about the food and the era.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeannette M

    An interesting glimpse at the food and drink featured in many Mad Men episodes, with a episode guides, food history, etc., especially to the delight of my cocktail nerd boyfriend.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Woo Hoo!!! Thanks for the cookbook!! I love cookbooks and have already devoured (pun intended) this one cover to cover. I am looking forward to making some of the dishes after the holidays!!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Pretty well-researched and informative, actually. I was pleasantly surprised.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Mcbroom

    I don't cook but loved these vintage recipes. I was a child in the early 60's and this brought back memories. I don't cook but loved these vintage recipes. I was a child in the early 60's and this brought back memories.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Violet

    If your a big fan of the show like I am this is a must buy. Not only does it have great recipes but history on the show and time period. Great fun...

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