30 review for The Horror at Martin's Beach

  1. 5 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    3.5 'On May 17th the crew of the fishing smack Alma of Gloucester, under Capt. James P. Orne, killed, after a battle of nearly forty hours, a marine monster whose size and aspect produced the greatest possible stir in scientific circles'. Experts soon realize that this 50-ft creature is only an infant. The captain of the boat gets a lot of money charging admission fees for those who want to see it. Then the creature disappeared. What happens after that is what makes this story great. The way the cr 3.5 'On May 17th the crew of the fishing smack Alma of Gloucester, under Capt. James P. Orne, killed, after a battle of nearly forty hours, a marine monster whose size and aspect produced the greatest possible stir in scientific circles'. Experts soon realize that this 50-ft creature is only an infant. The captain of the boat gets a lot of money charging admission fees for those who want to see it. Then the creature disappeared. What happens after that is what makes this story great. The way the creature (or its parent, I am not sure) gets its revenge is both special and creepy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Linton

    A rather unusual story when compared to Lovecraft's other work. It is more similar in theme to something by Junji Ito. A rather unusual story when compared to Lovecraft's other work. It is more similar in theme to something by Junji Ito.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    Be careful of what you take from the deep ocean.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    The Horror at Martin's Beach Originally published November 1923 We begin with Sailors battling a collosal beast, for hours they struggle to bring the creature to shore. When they do it causes panic and terror, the creature bears strange anatomical irregularities such as a single large eye and rudimentary forelegs and six-toed feet in place of pectoral fins. After inspection by marine biologists, it is revealed to be just a juvenile. A baby, which of course means there are larger beasts of similar The Horror at Martin's Beach Originally published November 1923 We begin with Sailors battling a collosal beast, for hours they struggle to bring the creature to shore. When they do it causes panic and terror, the creature bears strange anatomical irregularities such as a single large eye and rudimentary forelegs and six-toed feet in place of pectoral fins. After inspection by marine biologists, it is revealed to be just a juvenile. A baby, which of course means there are larger beasts of similar fashion. This is when the terror sets in and moreso when the mother of this poor, strange creature seeks revenge. . This short story could be much longer and I would have been very happy. For being Lovecraft I found it actually moved at a very quick speed. It's almost a Lovecraft for beginners pace and style. He puts the thesaurus down for a few paragraphs which is nice. Instead of taking paragraphs to explain a sentence he keeps it pretty focused. It's just really short with no lasting payoff

  5. 4 out of 5

    Per

    https://archive.org/details/WeirdTale... https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Ho... Different names, same story. Written by Sonia H. Green just before she married Lovecraft, with his help. Unsure whether to shelve this with the other Cthulhu stuff or not, but, eh, close enough. https://www.tor.com/2016/10/05/like-t... https://archive.org/details/WeirdTale... https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Ho... Different names, same story. Written by Sonia H. Green just before she married Lovecraft, with his help. Unsure whether to shelve this with the other Cthulhu stuff or not, but, eh, close enough. https://www.tor.com/2016/10/05/like-t...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I thought it was genuinely horrific; much more clear than a normal Lovecraft story; but then this was more of a collaboration with his wife.

  7. 5 out of 5

    AnnMarie

    I love Lovecraft! The story was OK. In honor of him I can't give any of his books/stories lower then 4 stars! Its a basic horrors of the deep story but well written of course! I love Lovecraft! The story was OK. In honor of him I can't give any of his books/stories lower then 4 stars! Its a basic horrors of the deep story but well written of course!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    1922: The Horror at Martin’s Beach (with Sonia H. Greene) “There now burst from the infuriate sky such a mad cataclysm of satanic sound that even the former crash seemed dwarfed.” 1921, July 5 – Lovecraft and Sonia Greene. “The Horror at Martin’s Beach” is arguably the forty third oldest surviving fictional work by American weird fiction author H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). It was written “probably in June 1922” (Schultz & Joshi, 2001, p. 113) and first published in Weird Tales under the tile “The 1922: The Horror at Martin’s Beach (with Sonia H. Greene) “There now burst from the infuriate sky such a mad cataclysm of satanic sound that even the former crash seemed dwarfed.” 1921, July 5 – Lovecraft and Sonia Greene. “The Horror at Martin’s Beach” is arguably the forty third oldest surviving fictional work by American weird fiction author H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). It was written “probably in June 1922” (Schultz & Joshi, 2001, p. 113) and first published in Weird Tales under the tile “The Invisible Monster” in November 1923. It has the distinction of being the only extant story he worked on with his then future wife Sonia Greene (1883-1972). HPL’s relationship with Greene is one of the biggest mysteries of his life and one of great interest to nosey people such as myself. She is the only person that we know of who had a romantic relationship with the author. We know from surviving articles and letters that Lovecraft was a bigot: he was openly racist and xenophobic. An article by Bobby Derie called “‘Concerning the Conservative (1915) by Charles D. Isaacson” (2020) provides a good look into Lovecraft’s antisemitism, with that form of prejudice evident in the author’s writings all the way back to when he was only 10 to 12 years old. How could HPL possibly have rationalized marrying a Jewish immigrant from Eastern Europe? And how did Greene rationalize marrying such a man? According to Joshi & Schultz (2001), Sonia Haft Greene Lovecraft Davis was born Sonia Haft Shafirkin in Ukraine in 1883, making her 7 years older than her future second husband Howard Philips Lovecraft. She emigrated to the United States in 1892. After her first marriage ended in the death, possibly suicide, of her first husband, she became “a highly paid executive at a clothing store in Manhattan” (p. 59) and developed an interest in amateur journalism in 1917. 1921, July 5 – Rheinhart Kleiner, Sonia Greene, and Lovecraft in Boston. In early July 1921, Greene went to the NAPA convention in Boston where mutual friend “Rheinhart Kleiner introduced her to HPL” (p. 59) for the first time. She developed a letter correspondence with HPL over the next 2.5 years and visited him in his hometown of Providence, Rhode Island relatively frequently. During this time she got him to visit her in Gloucester and Magnolia, Massachusetts from June 26-July 5, 1922. It was probably during this time that Greene wrote the first draft of “The Horror at Martin’s Beach” and HPL revised it. We really don’t know how much of the finished version was written by either person. The tale has more of a grounded feel than most of Lovecraft’s work and that is probably attributable to Greene. It’s a shame that they did not collaborate on more fiction. 1921, July 5 – Published in Sonia Greene’s The Rainbow.” I’d like to think that Greene herself took the picture. HPL and Greene would later work together on Greene’s amateur journal The Rainbow . By March 3, 1924 they were married and moved to Brooklyn together. This became one of the darkest periods in HPL’s life and the relationship did not last. Unfortunately, we do not know very many details of their relationship. Lovecraft rarely wrote about his spouse in letters and Greene burned all of their extensive personal correspondence in 1933 before she moved to California (Joshi & Schultz, 2001; Writer, 2007; Derie, 2020). Greene did write a short autobiography called The Private Life of H.P. Lovecraft. This was first published in unedited form in 1985. This work is notoriously hard to find. Bobby Derie did write an interesting article about it and Greene’s relationship with HPL in 2020. It can be found at the end of this review in the sources section. Title: “The Horror at Martin’s Beach” Authors: Sonia Greene and H.P. Lovecraft Dates: June 1922 (written); November 1923 (first publication), 1989 (second publication) Genre: Fiction - Short story: horror Word count: 2,380 words Date(s) read: 3/5/22-3/6/22 Reading journal entry #71 in 2022 Sources: Derie, B. (2020, February 5). “Concerning the Conservative” (1915) by Charles D. Isaacson [web log]. Retrieved March 5, 2022, from https://deepcuts.blog/2020/02/05/conc... Derie, B. (2020, June 7). “The Private Life of H. P. Lovecraft (1985) by Sonia H. Davis” (2020) [web log]. Retrieved March 5, 2022, from https://deepcuts.blog/2020/06/17/the-... Joshi, S. T., & Schultz, D. E. (2001). An H.P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia. Greenwood Press. Staff, W. (2007, February 6). The Mysterious Love of Sonia Greene for H.P. Lovecraft. Wired. https://www.wired.com/2007/02/the-mys... First publication citation: Weird Tales vol. 2, no. 4 (November 1923): 75–76, 83 (as “The Invisible Monster”). Second publication citation: The Horror in the Museum and Other Revisions. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, [1989]. [325]–330. https://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/... Photographs: “1921, July 5 – Lovecraft and Sonia Greene”: https://hplovecraft.com/life/gallery.... “Sonia Greene, 1921”: https://www.wired.com/2007/02/the-mys... Lovecraft, taken on “1921, July 5 – Published in Sonia Greene’s The Rainbow”: https://hplovecraft.com/life/gallery/... “1921, July 5 – Rheinhart Kleiner, Sonia Greene, and Lovecraft in Boston.”: https://hplovecraft.com/life/gallery....

  9. 5 out of 5

    Netanella

    The moon went partly under a cloud, and in the half-light the line of swaying men resembled some sinister and gigantic centipede, writhing in the clutch of a terrible creeping death. In the early 1920's, a 50-foot monstrous fish is captured at sea, showing clear signs of mutation - digit-like arms, six-toed feet for dorsal fins, a single eyeball in its head. And it's an infant. Displayed as an oddity at the seaside resort of Martin's Beach, the creature and its ship museum is swept back to sea du The moon went partly under a cloud, and in the half-light the line of swaying men resembled some sinister and gigantic centipede, writhing in the clutch of a terrible creeping death. In the early 1920's, a 50-foot monstrous fish is captured at sea, showing clear signs of mutation - digit-like arms, six-toed feet for dorsal fins, a single eyeball in its head. And it's an infant. Displayed as an oddity at the seaside resort of Martin's Beach, the creature and its ship museum is swept back to sea during a sudden, freak storm. The next day, the true horror begins. A terrific beach read!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kori

    A very effective short story; it’s been a while since I’ve read Lovecraft but I’m hesitant to see this as his story, since he was a reviser & editor. To me, this is clearly Sonia Greene: her descriptions are vivid, her vocab direct & clear to help readers visual what the characters are experiencing while keeping the actual nature of the horror obscured. The setting, themes, and conclusion feel very Lovecraftian, but I wonder if that’s more a reflection of horror stories of the 1920s than this be A very effective short story; it’s been a while since I’ve read Lovecraft but I’m hesitant to see this as his story, since he was a reviser & editor. To me, this is clearly Sonia Greene: her descriptions are vivid, her vocab direct & clear to help readers visual what the characters are experiencing while keeping the actual nature of the horror obscured. The setting, themes, and conclusion feel very Lovecraftian, but I wonder if that’s more a reflection of horror stories of the 1920s than this being a co-written work between Greene & Lovecraft. Would love to hear other folx’s thoughts on this.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Vatroslav Herceg

    Wordswort Editions 2010. The language is strong in this one. Atmospheric, dynamic and vivid. The structure of this short story is constructred trough a third person narrator who does not partake in the content, thus it has a heterodiegetic narrator. The story is quite edwoodian, like a Ed Wood science fiction film from the fifties. It only misses aliens to be truly fullfilled. Read it! ¡Hasta luego!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Salem

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. First of all, I would consider this to be more of a Sophia Greene story than anything, considering Lovecraft mostly acted as editor on the project. All that aside, this is definitely an underrated classic! The uncanny nature of the monster’s powers (compelling a bunch of terrified and fully cognizant people to stand in the ocean as the tide slowly rises) is really unsettling in a way that you don’t see in a lot of horror, and I wish Greene had a bibliography as prolific as her spouse.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    And that my friends is precisely why I stay as far away from the ocean as possible. There’s some pretty whacky stuff down there that shouldn’t be messed with. A couple of sailors drop a line in the ocean to save someone, but something far heavier and sinister pulls back, causing a whirlpool of death and terrible screams.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julia Leporace

    "I recall thinking of those heads, and the bulging eyes they must contain; eyes that might well reflect all the fright, panic, and delirium of a malignant universe - all the sorrow, sin, and misery, blasted hopes and unfulfilled desires, fear, loathing and anguish of the ages since time's beginning; eyes alight with all the soul-racking pain of eternally blazing infernos." "I recall thinking of those heads, and the bulging eyes they must contain; eyes that might well reflect all the fright, panic, and delirium of a malignant universe - all the sorrow, sin, and misery, blasted hopes and unfulfilled desires, fear, loathing and anguish of the ages since time's beginning; eyes alight with all the soul-racking pain of eternally blazing infernos."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ana Paula

    It's a good short story. I did'nt know it was a collaboration but now I noticed there are some small changes in Lovecraft's style. More direct, so to speak, but whit all the terror of the inevitable clasic of Lovecraft, of a group of people who know they are marching to a certain death and can do nothing about it, and the horrible master mind behind it who gets the last laugh. It's a good short story. I did'nt know it was a collaboration but now I noticed there are some small changes in Lovecraft's style. More direct, so to speak, but whit all the terror of the inevitable clasic of Lovecraft, of a group of people who know they are marching to a certain death and can do nothing about it, and the horrible master mind behind it who gets the last laugh.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    This was good and mildly frigthening.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Garza

    I was very pleased and terrified by this unique story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    CRTyroak

    Yet another marvellous tale from Lovecraft. Descriptive and compelling. The unknown is resonating, and humanity is but a troupe of puppets controlled by a mysterious and exacting tentacle.

  19. 4 out of 5

    R.V.

    A short gripping tale. While very a simple in plot, the amazing use of language makes for rich mental images.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rizzie

    I don't remember anything about this story, and I just read it yesterday. 2 stars for pity. I don't remember anything about this story, and I just read it yesterday. 2 stars for pity.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tim Pyne

    A work by Sonia Greene even though HP received credit. I like her work and wish there was more of it. Its short but vivid and reminds me a bit of a really well done radio drama.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Audible edition narrated by Bronson Pinchot.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Togepins

    It didn't have a lasting impact. It didn't have a lasting impact.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Dailey

    Nice eerie little nature revenge story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    FameL

    The lore and the ending are the most interesting things here. Story is creepy from start to finish. Also I was impressed by battle with the cosmic being (?). Nice stuff, Lovecraft.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sean Harding

    After a couple of days hiatus from Lovecraft I have turned with this less than stellar one. It may be just me, but I found this one less than engaging. Progress: 7738/54313

  27. 4 out of 5

    nooker

    I do wish Lovecraft collaborated with his wife more.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vick

    Another good short story by Lovecraft and S. Greene. Its not as intensely engaging or horrific as their other stories, but just as good.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Peter Fox

    The Horror at Martin's Beach is everything you should expect from a Lovecraft story. There is something special about the way a story develops within the words used by Lovecraft. You know that there will be a twist after an extended story telling phase, that will eventually culminate in an ending that doesn't truly end but leaves the reader in a state of wonder. This is why i will always hold Lovecraft in a special place that no author is allowed to go and or is too scared to venture into witho The Horror at Martin's Beach is everything you should expect from a Lovecraft story. There is something special about the way a story develops within the words used by Lovecraft. You know that there will be a twist after an extended story telling phase, that will eventually culminate in an ending that doesn't truly end but leaves the reader in a state of wonder. This is why i will always hold Lovecraft in a special place that no author is allowed to go and or is too scared to venture into without a sound knowledge of the Necronomicon.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marco

    This novelette is well-known because it is one of the best collaboration of H.P. Lovecraft and his soon-to-be wife Sonia Greene. It was written during their courtship. It is not a bad story, even if some of the tropes it employs are a little stale for a modern reader. A huge monstrous sea creature is captured in the sea, and placed on display inside a boat at Martin's beach. Few days later the boat vanishes mysteriously... and that's just the beginning of the troubles that will hit the Ocean town This novelette is well-known because it is one of the best collaboration of H.P. Lovecraft and his soon-to-be wife Sonia Greene. It was written during their courtship. It is not a bad story, even if some of the tropes it employs are a little stale for a modern reader. A huge monstrous sea creature is captured in the sea, and placed on display inside a boat at Martin's beach. Few days later the boat vanishes mysteriously... and that's just the beginning of the troubles that will hit the Ocean town.

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