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The Thing on the Doorstep (Fantasy and Horror Classics): With a Dedication by George Henry Weiss

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First published in 1937 in "Weird Tales", "The Thing on the Doorstep" is a horror short story by American author H. P. Lovecraft. The story revolves around the narrator Daniel Upton recounting the circumstances under which he was forced to kill his friend Edward Derby, who had dabbled too much in the dark arts and given up his body to an evil supernatural force with malign First published in 1937 in "Weird Tales", "The Thing on the Doorstep" is a horror short story by American author H. P. Lovecraft. The story revolves around the narrator Daniel Upton recounting the circumstances under which he was forced to kill his friend Edward Derby, who had dabbled too much in the dark arts and given up his body to an evil supernatural force with malign intentions. Part of our "Fantasy and Horror Classics" imprint, "The Thing on the Doorstep" constitutes a must-read for horror lovers and fans of Lovecraft's chilling work. Howard Phillips Lovecraft (1890-1937) was an American writer of supernatural horror fiction. Though his works remained largely unknown and did not furnish him with a decent living, Lovecraft is today considered to be among the most significant writers of supernatural horror fiction of the twentieth century. Other notable works by this author include: "At The Mountains of Madness", "The Rats in the Walls", and "The Shadow Over Innsmouth". Read & Co. is publishing this classic novella now in a new edition with a dedication by George Henry Weiss.


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First published in 1937 in "Weird Tales", "The Thing on the Doorstep" is a horror short story by American author H. P. Lovecraft. The story revolves around the narrator Daniel Upton recounting the circumstances under which he was forced to kill his friend Edward Derby, who had dabbled too much in the dark arts and given up his body to an evil supernatural force with malign First published in 1937 in "Weird Tales", "The Thing on the Doorstep" is a horror short story by American author H. P. Lovecraft. The story revolves around the narrator Daniel Upton recounting the circumstances under which he was forced to kill his friend Edward Derby, who had dabbled too much in the dark arts and given up his body to an evil supernatural force with malign intentions. Part of our "Fantasy and Horror Classics" imprint, "The Thing on the Doorstep" constitutes a must-read for horror lovers and fans of Lovecraft's chilling work. Howard Phillips Lovecraft (1890-1937) was an American writer of supernatural horror fiction. Though his works remained largely unknown and did not furnish him with a decent living, Lovecraft is today considered to be among the most significant writers of supernatural horror fiction of the twentieth century. Other notable works by this author include: "At The Mountains of Madness", "The Rats in the Walls", and "The Shadow Over Innsmouth". Read & Co. is publishing this classic novella now in a new edition with a dedication by George Henry Weiss.

30 review for The Thing on the Doorstep (Fantasy and Horror Classics): With a Dedication by George Henry Weiss

  1. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Russell

    "I do not know—but others have strange things to tell of Edward and Asenath Derby, and even the stolid police are at their wits’ ends to account for that last terrible visit." - H.P. Lovecraft, The Thing on the Doorstep I must say I am particularly drawn to this harrowing H.P. Lovecraft tale of terror first published in 1937 since the author probes deeply into the various psychological and magical dimensions of consciousness, personal identity and personality via the story’s major theme: mind-tra "I do not know—but others have strange things to tell of Edward and Asenath Derby, and even the stolid police are at their wits’ ends to account for that last terrible visit." - H.P. Lovecraft, The Thing on the Doorstep I must say I am particularly drawn to this harrowing H.P. Lovecraft tale of terror first published in 1937 since the author probes deeply into the various psychological and magical dimensions of consciousness, personal identity and personality via the story’s major theme: mind-transference. Also, how the narrator, Daniel Upton, along with his friend Edward Derby plunge head first down dark pits of horror leading to the final climactic scene when Upton encounters the thing on the doorstep. But, and here’s the key point, both men's long downward spiral spanning many years is taken in numerous small steps throughout the tale’s twenty-five pages, each step occurring within a deftly created atmosphere and articulated in the author's vivid, singular language. To provide a sampling of these many haunting, Lovecraftian steps, here are my comments conjoined with a number of direct quotes, a baker’s dozen, taken from the beginning chapters: “An only child, he had organic weaknesses which startled his doting parents and caused them to keep him closely chained to their side. He was never allowed out without his nurse, and seldom had a chance to play unconstrainedly with other children. All this doubtless fostered a strange, secretive inner life in the boy, with imagination as his one avenue of freedom” ---- Edward Derby sounds like Lovercraft himself, an only child, sickly, living in seclusion, left alone with his vivid imagination. An entire mythology of the disturbed loaner has developed in the United States over the years, a mythology fueled by the media: when there’s a violent crime its usually committed by a loner. “About that time I had leanings toward art of a somewhat grotesque cast, and I found in this younger child a rare kindred spirit.” ---- Likewise, the narrator, Daniel Upton, has much in common with young Edward Derby revolving around the arts and literature, particularly those works and writings pertaining to the bizarre and fantastic. “As he grew to years of manhood he retained a deceptive aspect of boyishness.” ---- An indication of how, according to Upton, Edward Derby’s life is counter to the natural transformation a boy undergoes to become a man. “What he did do was to become an almost fanatical devotee of subterranean magical lore.” ---- The plot thicken: Edward Derby the artistically inclined loner hasn't become a real man and in his protracted immature boyhood turns to the black arts. “He was thirty-four, and for months he was incapacitated by some odd psychological malady” ---- With his physical illness in youth, his being a loner and follower of black magic, some would predict it follows logically Derby would develop serious mental issues, perhaps the lingering residue of how in past ages Edward would be labeled an alchemist and even a heretic, someone who must be destroyed. “Edward was thirty-eight when he met Asenath Waite. She was, I judge, about twenty-three at the time. She was dark, smallish, and very good-looking except for overprotuberant eyes. ---- Why not? After all, Asenath is an attractive young lady. “The old man was known to have been a prodigious magical student in his day, and legend averred that he could raise or quell storms at sea according to his whim. ---- Now that sounds serious in that not only is Asenath’s father acquainted with the dark arts but proficient in them; in other words, he is not only a student but a accomplished sorcerer. “Most unusual, though, were the well-attested cases of her influence over other persons. She was, beyond question, a genuine hypnotist. By gazing peculiarly at a fellow-student she would often give the latter a distinct feeling of exchanged personality” ---- Similar to her father, it appears Asenath is also something of a sorceress. And a sorceress with power! Time to watch out. “Her crowning rage, however, was that she was not a man; since she believed a male brain had certain unique and far-reaching cosmic powers. Given a man’s brain, she declared, she could not only equal but surpass her father in mastery of unknown forces.” –--- Here’s one tale where H.P. Lovecraft includes a woman and develops her character. And Asenath seeks far-reaching cosmic powers - by becoming a man! The men in her life could be in for some exciting times. From this point forward we are well to ask if both Edward Derby and Daniel Upton are more than a little naïve and trusting. “When Edward called on me after the honeymoon I thought he looked slightly changed.” ---- Could this change be more than one simply involving personality? Or, is Daniel Upton witnessing the first step in a shift in personal identity for Edward Derby as a result of Asenath using her powers to put herself in a man’s body? He was progressing fast in esoteric lore now that he had Asenath’s guidance. Some of the experiments she proposed were very daring and radical—he did not feel at liberty to describe them—but he had confidence in her powers and intentions."---- Confidence in her intentions! It would be bad news indeed if Edward Derby thought his wife Asenath had evil intentions. But, again, is this confidence the result of a shift in personality or a more drastic change, a shift in his personal identity? Why doesn’t Daniel Upton pick up on this possibility? “It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to shew by this statement that I am not his murderer. At first I shall be called a madman—madder than the man I shot in his cell at the Arkham Sanitarium.” ---- The tale’s first lines. What if the majority of Daniel Upton’s statements about Asenath and Edward Derby are mere plays of fantasy? What if Daniel was so resentful of losing his friend to marriage that he concocted the whole tale as a projection of his deranged mind in an attempt to justify his murder of Derby and imprisonment of Asenath? “Even now I ask myself whether I was misled—or whether I am not mad after all.” ---- Is Daniel Upton finally admitting to himself the possibility of his own madness, how his imagination ran wild? I will leave you to wrestle with these question as mind-transference takes on spookier, decidedly more powerful dimensions in the second half of Lovecraft’s story. Available online via this link: http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/t...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Daniel Upton's friend Edward seems to be completely changed after his marriage to a younger woman. Asenath lives in Innsmouth (!) and seems to be into dark magic. Her father recently died. What influence does she have over Edward? What about the strange cosmic evils Edward is talking about? And what about his body? A very uncanny Cthulhu story of Lovecraft. Highly recommended! Daniel Upton's friend Edward seems to be completely changed after his marriage to a younger woman. Asenath lives in Innsmouth (!) and seems to be into dark magic. Her father recently died. What influence does she have over Edward? What about the strange cosmic evils Edward is talking about? And what about his body? A very uncanny Cthulhu story of Lovecraft. Highly recommended!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Knock, knock! You're doomed! TRULY SCARY TALE Daniel Upton and Edward Derby were best friends. However, Upton has to kill Derby to save him. Yes, you read right... ...this seems to sound weird but in this creepy tale, it’s explained the unusual predicament in which poor Derby is involved... ...and how death maybe is his only escape from it,... ...but even Upton maybe will be cursed too. Friendship is a heavy burden... ...in Lovecraft Country. Knock, knock! You're doomed! TRULY SCARY TALE Daniel Upton and Edward Derby were best friends. However, Upton has to kill Derby to save him. Yes, you read right... ...this seems to sound weird but in this creepy tale, it’s explained the unusual predicament in which poor Derby is involved... ...and how death maybe is his only escape from it,... ...but even Upton maybe will be cursed too. Friendship is a heavy burden... ...in Lovecraft Country.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    H.P. was dissatisfied with “The Thing on the Doorstep” and hesitated to submit it; although it was written in August of 1933, it was not published until more than three years later, in Weird Tales (January 1937). I do not share his hesitancy and dissatisfaction, for not only do I think that it is one of the most enjoyable and best constructed of his medium length tales, notable for its visceral shudders as well as for its cosmic terrors, but I also believe it contains glimpses of autobiography t H.P. was dissatisfied with “The Thing on the Doorstep” and hesitated to submit it; although it was written in August of 1933, it was not published until more than three years later, in Weird Tales (January 1937). I do not share his hesitancy and dissatisfaction, for not only do I think that it is one of the most enjoyable and best constructed of his medium length tales, notable for its visceral shudders as well as for its cosmic terrors, but I also believe it contains glimpses of autobiography that hint at the emotional dynamics of Lovecraft’s abortive marriage. Concerning Lovecraft’s marriage to Sonia Greene, I think this much is clear: Greene was the dominant force. Forty years old at the time of their marriage (seven years older than Lovecraft) the widow Greene—who had earlier dated Aleister Crowley—was the mother of an estranged daughter of nineteen and the breadwinner of the Lovecraft family. They resided in New York City throughout the active period of their marriage, and toward the end she traveled around the country for her Cleveland employer, sending H.P. a small check to keep body and soul together. Meanwhile, Lovecraft eked out an existence, in near poverty, in his Red Hook New Jersey flat. I can’t help but thinking of all this when I read, in “The Thing on the Doorstep,” how Asenath Derby, psychologically stronger than her author/ esthete husband Edward, gains more and more power over him, and how she takes frequent trips, leaving him a virtual prisoner in their Arkham home. Later, she is rumored to have packed her bags and moved to New York City. But by this time the reader knows the truth is far more complicated--and much more ghastly--than this. Who else but H.P. Lovecraft could turn a failed marriage into an effective tale of supernatural horror? And what could be more ghastly—or more disgusting—than that vilest of all visitors, The Thing on the Doorstep?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Zain

    Now This is Lovecraft! Dan has known Edward Derby since they were children. They lived in Arkham, of course. And though Edward grew up as a shy and insular boy, he had a precocious desire for knowledge. Except for Dan, Edward didn’t have many friends, until the day he met Asenath Waite, from the infamous Waite clan of Innsmouth. The things he thought he knew about the occult and unspeakable activity was nothing compared to the amount of depravity that she knew. And her reputation preceded her. Dan Now This is Lovecraft! Dan has known Edward Derby since they were children. They lived in Arkham, of course. And though Edward grew up as a shy and insular boy, he had a precocious desire for knowledge. Except for Dan, Edward didn’t have many friends, until the day he met Asenath Waite, from the infamous Waite clan of Innsmouth. The things he thought he knew about the occult and unspeakable activity was nothing compared to the amount of depravity that she knew. And her reputation preceded her. Dan and Edward’s father could sense she was trouble, but Asenath already had a hold over him. And their union would lead to the end of Edward’s sanity…as well as Dan’s.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    More occult than cosmic terror, The Thing on the Doorstep presents a slow buildup, with well paced reveals, to what may be the most terrifying ending I can recall in a Lovecraft story. Now that's saying something :) More occult than cosmic terror, The Thing on the Doorstep presents a slow buildup, with well paced reveals, to what may be the most terrifying ending I can recall in a Lovecraft story. Now that's saying something :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    One of the more pure-fantasy Lovecraft stories, with magic spells out of ancient books, no aliens or other dangers from space or alternate dimensions. Also one of his few active female (view spoiler)[or is she? (hide spoiler)] characters, along with an interesting but largely undeveloped set of themes about gender and sexuality. ["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]> One of the more pure-fantasy Lovecraft stories, with magic spells out of ancient books, no aliens or other dangers from space or alternate dimensions. Also one of his few active female (view spoiler)[or is she? (hide spoiler)] characters, along with an interesting but largely undeveloped set of themes about gender and sexuality.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    “There are horrors beyond life’s edge that we do not suspect, and once in a while man’s evil prying calls them just within our range.” Daniel Upton wants to tell you his story. He wants to explain his innocence. He shot his best friend, Edward Derby, six times and he claims justified reasoning. He tells of a love story, of Edward meeting and falling in love with Asenath Waite. The girl has been known to read things she shouldn’t read, to know and do things people shouldn’t. Girls in class look a “There are horrors beyond life’s edge that we do not suspect, and once in a while man’s evil prying calls them just within our range.” Daniel Upton wants to tell you his story. He wants to explain his innocence. He shot his best friend, Edward Derby, six times and he claims justified reasoning. He tells of a love story, of Edward meeting and falling in love with Asenath Waite. The girl has been known to read things she shouldn’t read, to know and do things people shouldn’t. Girls in class look at her and have the strange sensation they are looking at themselves through her eyes. They feel they are somehow trading bodies with her. Asenath needs a man. She needs the “perfection” of a man’s brain and the male ability to link to other worlds and dimensions. She prefers a man of a weaker will. Well, she doesn’t need a man as much as, say, the man’s body. She needs a new “home” so she can go places she shouldn’t. The mysteries unravel with this short read, takes about an hour and a half or so. This story replaces all other Lovecraft stories I’ve yet read in terror. I remember the nightmarish horror I felt as a child watching one of the Freddy Kreuger movies. We laughed through them but some scenes got to me. I remember kids singing (one-two) and a woman trying to run through coagulated blood (three-four). This story brings those kinds of feelings to me. I’m not saying everyone may feel this way. I’m sensitive to movies because I don’t watch many. I recently watched Pulp Fiction and became so disturbed I got sick (the dude in the box in black leather set me over the edge). If you like horror, this is it. Good luck. Don’t look in her eyes. Stay strong-willed. You might end up somewhere you don’t want to be. I looked on the net for more on this story and found this trailer. It sounds true to the story. The full movie also can be found online, free, but I haven’t yet seen it. Here you go: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKv5q...

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    Story- 4/5 Narration- 3.5/5

  10. 5 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    'It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to shew by this statement that I am not his murderer.' That's a promising beginning. The narrator Daniel Upton is perfectly aware how his explanation might sound. He even asks himself whether he was misled but, considering that others too have their own experiences of his friend Edward Derby and his wife Asenath, that's highly unlikely. One expects a lot from a story as soon as it is revealed that the wif 'It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to shew by this statement that I am not his murderer.' That's a promising beginning. The narrator Daniel Upton is perfectly aware how his explanation might sound. He even asks himself whether he was misled but, considering that others too have their own experiences of his friend Edward Derby and his wife Asenath, that's highly unlikely. One expects a lot from a story as soon as it is revealed that the wife is from Innsmouth. Lovecraft's lovers know what that means. There are two more prominent themes in The Thing on the Doorstep: mind-switching and gender. Save for the occasional mention the story lacks the expected deities and cosmic horror you expect to find in a story that is a part of the Cthulhu Mythos universe. It would have been an awesome story.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Read online here Description: Daniel Upton, the story's narrator, begins by telling that he has killed his best friend, Edward Derby, and that he hopes his account will prove that he is not a murderer ... Opening: It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer. At first I shall be called a madman - madder than the man I shot in his cell at the Arkham Sanitarium. Later some of my readers will weigh each Read online here Description: Daniel Upton, the story's narrator, begins by telling that he has killed his best friend, Edward Derby, and that he hopes his account will prove that he is not a murderer ... Opening: It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer. At first I shall be called a madman - madder than the man I shot in his cell at the Arkham Sanitarium. Later some of my readers will weigh each statement, correlate it with the known facts, and ask themselves how I could have believed otherwise than I did after facing the evidence of that horror - that thing on the doorstep. A month of Halloween 2015 reads: #1: 3* Nobody True by James Herbert: fraudio #2: 4* The Horror Stories of Robert E. Howard: fraudio #3: 1* Brain Child by John Saul: fraudio #4: 3* Domain (Rats #3) by James Herbert: fraudio #5: 3* The Mourning Vessels by Peter Luther: paperback #6: 2* The Doom of the Great City: ebook short-story #7: 5* Long After Midnight by Ray Bradbury: fraudio #8: 5* The Dead Zone by Stephen King: fraudio #9: CR The Chalice: hardback #10: WL Seven Gothic Tales #11: CR Tales of Men and Ghosts: gutenberg #12: 2* Shattered by Dean Koontz: fraudio #13: 5* The Dunwich Horror: e-book: gutenberg #14: TR Death At Intervals: paperback #15: 3* Alone: gutenberg #16: CR The Shunned House: gutenberg #17: 4* The Thing on the Doorstep #18: 2* Shadows by Saul: fraudio #19: CR Precious Cargo: paperback #20: 2* The Magicians of the Golden Dawn: ebook #21: 2* The Book of Black Magic #22: 4* Beyond the Wall of Sleep

  12. 5 out of 5

    Дарья

    The best H.P. Lovecraft short story I have read so far; I cannot even begin to describe how remarkable this was. This is one of those stories that will captivate you and remain with you to ponder upon days after you have read it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy (Other Amy)

    Some people know things about the universe that nobody ought to know, and can do things that nobody ought to be able to do. I’ve been in it up to my neck, but that’s the end. Today I’d burn that damned Necronomicon and all the rest if I were librarian at Miskatonic. This is a thing I've been thinking myself for a while. I'm no book burner, but, were we living in Arkham, the biggest hero would be the one who burned down the damned library. Sure, they have other copies of the Necronomicon, but that Some people know things about the universe that nobody ought to know, and can do things that nobody ought to be able to do. I’ve been in it up to my neck, but that’s the end. Today I’d burn that damned Necronomicon and all the rest if I were librarian at Miskatonic. This is a thing I've been thinking myself for a while. I'm no book burner, but, were we living in Arkham, the biggest hero would be the one who burned down the damned library. Sure, they have other copies of the Necronomicon, but that copy at Arkham seems to be the one that is most convenient to all the necromancers and wizards and hell spawn. Just saying. Anyway, this was a fun read. Even though it left me with a quote from As Good As It Gets knocking around in my head: "How do you write women so well?" "I think of a man, and I take away reason and accountability." Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Howard Philips Lovecraft.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    A re-read. "It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer." Is that a great first line, or what? A frightening tale of stolen identity and ancient, immortal horrors. The narrator, Dan, was friends with Edward Derby since childhood. However, he saw Edward grow up into an unassertive, weak-willed man, who eventually merely transferred his dependence on his parents onto his new wife, Asenath... an Innsmou A re-read. "It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer." Is that a great first line, or what? A frightening tale of stolen identity and ancient, immortal horrors. The narrator, Dan, was friends with Edward Derby since childhood. However, he saw Edward grow up into an unassertive, weak-willed man, who eventually merely transferred his dependence on his parents onto his new wife, Asenath... an Innsmouth woman with strangely protuberant eyes. Of course we know that anyone from Innsmouth is bound to be bad news, but in this case, the horror runs even deeper than one might guess. This story is full of all of the favorite Lovecraftian motifs... and would be nearly perfect, except for the fact that the narrative depends on the aggravating plot point that (view spoiler)[Asenath's body is unsatisfactory to the ancient spirit that had possessed it because the female brain is inferior. Of course, it's also pointed out, as a secondary negative factor, that she's also not fully human, but the female thing just seems to be unacceptable. (hide spoiler)] And that concept is more than a bit unacceptable to me. It's a shame, because this story is near-perfect in ever other respect. (Full disclosure: there are New England Asenaths in my family tree - don't dis them!) ;-)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Wow, that was quite the mind-blowing trip. It starts off with the narrator claiming that he visited his best friend in an asylum and put six bullets in his head, immediately following up with the statement that he’s not a murderer. It doesn’t take long for the readers to figure out that there’s something horribly wrong here. The narrator’s best friend was a relatively down-to-earth chap until he met his wife from Innsmouth (a very bad place if you’ve read The Shadow over Innsmouth) and begins to Wow, that was quite the mind-blowing trip. It starts off with the narrator claiming that he visited his best friend in an asylum and put six bullets in his head, immediately following up with the statement that he’s not a murderer. It doesn’t take long for the readers to figure out that there’s something horribly wrong here. The narrator’s best friend was a relatively down-to-earth chap until he met his wife from Innsmouth (a very bad place if you’ve read The Shadow over Innsmouth) and begins to develop a taste for the dark arts. He gets his hands on the Necronomicon and his wife leads him down a very dark path which leads to possession, soul switching, demon summoning and all kinds of other wacky supernatural events. It turns out that the person in the asylum that the narrator killed wasn’t really his friend, but a monster using his body in hopes of bringing calamity to the world. The narrator is left with quite a few mental scars, but he potentially saved the world at the end of the day. A trippy and fascinating horror tale. *** If you're looking for some dark ambient music for reading horror, dark fantasy and other books like this one, then be sure to check out my YouTube Channel called Nightmarish Compositions: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    Howard Phillips Lovecraft was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction.. Also: "Lovecraftian", the word does not appear in the Oxford English Dictionary, but there can be few readers who are unaware of its meaning. "Lovecraftian" implies a very specific type of supernatural tale - of ancient horrors imagined in the darkest regions of one's subconscious, or glimpsed out of the corner of one's eye.. These are excerpts from the introduction of his works, but they are so accurate which Howard Phillips Lovecraft was an American author of fantasy, horror and science fiction.. Also: "Lovecraftian", the word does not appear in the Oxford English Dictionary, but there can be few readers who are unaware of its meaning. "Lovecraftian" implies a very specific type of supernatural tale - of ancient horrors imagined in the darkest regions of one's subconscious, or glimpsed out of the corner of one's eye.. These are excerpts from the introduction of his works, but they are so accurate which is the reason I had to share them with my friends!! Yes, I love Lovecrafttian novels and short stories, because of the world they create and also how the tension increases more and more.. His characters are mostly suffering from mental disease of any kind.. Or they have commited an atrocious crime which they try to explain.. "The Thing on the Doorsteps" is no exception to this, as you can see for yourself: "..It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer.." A quick and scary read.. I do recommend it to all lovers of fantasy and horror tales.. Dean;)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    Read this story and you have a better appreciation for Alan Moore's comic Providence. Read this story and you have a better appreciation for Alan Moore's comic Providence.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    At long last, I finally understand the Edward Derby references! MY GRADE: B to B plus.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zuky the BookBum

    Wow. I wasn't sure what to I was going to think of this, as several state it's not his best of stories, but as I'm a new reader of Lovecraft, I have nothing to compare this to, so I enjoyed it hugely! The opening line of this story, It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer," is enough to completely suck you in to the story. You'll find yourself getting lost in this piece of fiction, coming o Wow. I wasn't sure what to I was going to think of this, as several state it's not his best of stories, but as I'm a new reader of Lovecraft, I have nothing to compare this to, so I enjoyed it hugely! The opening line of this story, It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer," is enough to completely suck you in to the story. You'll find yourself getting lost in this piece of fiction, coming out the other side of it dazed, horrified and delighted. This story has some of the best tension building, leaving you to decide what is happening to the ever changing Edward and his mysterious wife Asenath. The hints to black magic and the occult make this story really ominous, dark and brooding. This is really a terrific horror story. If this isn't one of his best, I'm excited to see what his other stories bring!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Even though you get an idea of what is going to happen at the beginning, this story is still profoundly frightening. Lovecraft is not for the faint of heart, or those with a tenuous grip on reality. However, I highly recommend him for those who like to get that chill down their spine that only a convincing horror story can deliver. Being that I love most things horrifying, I don't know how I made it 25 years without reading any of his work, but I'm glad that I'm starting now. Even though you get an idea of what is going to happen at the beginning, this story is still profoundly frightening. Lovecraft is not for the faint of heart, or those with a tenuous grip on reality. However, I highly recommend him for those who like to get that chill down their spine that only a convincing horror story can deliver. Being that I love most things horrifying, I don't know how I made it 25 years without reading any of his work, but I'm glad that I'm starting now.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ramakrishna

    This would have been a good story had it not been sexist af. Sheesh.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael Gardner

    Lovecraft writes a cautionary tale about why it is unwise to marry a cosmic alien fish woman from Innsmouth. I'm cancelling my subscription to InnsmouthBrides.com. Lovecraft writes a cautionary tale about why it is unwise to marry a cosmic alien fish woman from Innsmouth. I'm cancelling my subscription to InnsmouthBrides.com.

  23. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Lovecraft's stories could be classic - the Cthulhu ones, for example - but his collection was a mix of hit-and-misses. This story however, is definitely one of the hits. It conveys a nice sense of horror with what happened with the real Asenath Waite, and the ultimate fate of the narrator's friend. There's a movie of this, but I haven't seen it, so I can't compare the two, but the written story is bloody fantastic on its own and in my opinion, one of Lovecraft's best. Lovecraft's stories could be classic - the Cthulhu ones, for example - but his collection was a mix of hit-and-misses. This story however, is definitely one of the hits. It conveys a nice sense of horror with what happened with the real Asenath Waite, and the ultimate fate of the narrator's friend. There's a movie of this, but I haven't seen it, so I can't compare the two, but the written story is bloody fantastic on its own and in my opinion, one of Lovecraft's best.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Julie Rylie

    Loved it! About a guy that was always interested in esoteric/ supernatural phenomena that meets an odd girl and they both get married. Turns out she isn't who he thought she was and she stars trying to take the life/ body out of him slowly. There are references to Innsmouth and the smell of fish from locals. Loved it! About a guy that was always interested in esoteric/ supernatural phenomena that meets an odd girl and they both get married. Turns out she isn't who he thought she was and she stars trying to take the life/ body out of him slowly. There are references to Innsmouth and the smell of fish from locals.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jen (LOHF/Book Den)

    I've probably read more things derived from Lovecraft than actual Lovecraft tales, but I've been making an effort to read Lovecraft more the last few years. I was a little leery heading into reading The Thing on the Doorstep simply because it is part of the Cthulhu mythos. While I have enjoyed many of the derivative works, I haven't had success with the original Cthulhu stories. I'm much more drawn to stories like The Shunned House and The Horror at Red Hook. I love hauntings and atmosphere and l I've probably read more things derived from Lovecraft than actual Lovecraft tales, but I've been making an effort to read Lovecraft more the last few years. I was a little leery heading into reading The Thing on the Doorstep simply because it is part of the Cthulhu mythos. While I have enjoyed many of the derivative works, I haven't had success with the original Cthulhu stories. I'm much more drawn to stories like The Shunned House and The Horror at Red Hook. I love hauntings and atmosphere and let's not forget the phosphorescence. I have a whole new love for Lovecraft after reading The Thing on the Doorstep, though. The Thing on the Doorstep was not an easy story to get into. Lovecraft's writing is probably why I have abandoned many Lovecraft stories over the years. It took me three tries of picking up The Thing on the Doorstep and starting over from the beginning to finally connect with it. I had to slow down and keep rereading to grasp what Lovecraft was saying through his complex and excessive writing style. Once the story got underway, though, his writing was much more accessible. I say that as a warning to stick with it and not a warning to stay away from it. In the end, I absolutely loved The Thing on the Doorstep. I don't want to give any spoilers so I will just give you the opening sentence: "It is true that I have sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show by this statement that I am not his murderer." It's only 40 pages long so I'm not going to divulge what is happening. There was so much I loved about The Thing on the Doorstep - the characters, the atmosphere, the suspense. I really enjoyed the storytelling despite the bloated writing. I'm in the mood to spend my October reading short horror so you will probably hear more about Lovecraft before the month has ended. I'm looking forward to revisiting and persevering through some of the Lovecraft tales that didn't work for me in the past. As for The Thing on the Doorstep, it is currently my favorite Lovecraft tale. 4.5 stars

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chakib Bahbaz

    Aseneth, is there such a thing ? My hair bristles every time i read this. “Dan—for God’s sake! The pit of the shoggoths! Down the six thousand steps . . . the abomination of abominations . . . I never would let her take me, and then I found myself there. . . . Iä! Shub-Niggurath! . . . The shape rose up from the altar, and there were 500 that howled. . . . The Hooded Thing bleated ‘Kamog! Kamog!’—that was old Ephraim’s secret name in the coven. . . . I was there, where she promised she wouldn’t t Aseneth, is there such a thing ? My hair bristles every time i read this. “Dan—for God’s sake! The pit of the shoggoths! Down the six thousand steps . . . the abomination of abominations . . . I never would let her take me, and then I found myself there. . . . Iä! Shub-Niggurath! . . . The shape rose up from the altar, and there were 500 that howled. . . . The Hooded Thing bleated ‘Kamog! Kamog!’—that was old Ephraim’s secret name in the coven. . . . I was there, where she promised she wouldn’t take me. . . . A minute before I was locked in the library, and then I was there where she had gone with my body—in the place of utter blasphemy, the unholy pit where the black realm begins and the watcher guards the gate. . . . I saw a shoggoth—it changed shape. . . . I can’t stand it. . . . I won’t stand it. . . . I’ll kill her if she ever sends me there again. . . . I’ll kill that entity . . . her, him, it . . . I’ll kill it! I’ll kill it with my own hands!” I'm sinking in Lovecraftian lit.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Noc

    Thrilling. Chilling. Killing. If there is a word that ends with -illing this story has them in spades. It's beautifully set up and executed and I rank it higher than some of his more famous works. Thrilling. Chilling. Killing. If there is a word that ends with -illing this story has them in spades. It's beautifully set up and executed and I rank it higher than some of his more famous works.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Working Man Reads

    I cannot pretend that this was not one of the better classic horror stories I have read. It honestly grabs your attention and holds it for the entire time. You follow Daniel who is the stories narrator, And his friend Edward Derby. Edward meets a young lady who had a father who was involved in cult activities. The young woman had abilities and almost came off as a psychic with witch like powers. Edward and the woman named Asenath develop a relationship. quickly Edward is pulled into researching I cannot pretend that this was not one of the better classic horror stories I have read. It honestly grabs your attention and holds it for the entire time. You follow Daniel who is the stories narrator, And his friend Edward Derby. Edward meets a young lady who had a father who was involved in cult activities. The young woman had abilities and almost came off as a psychic with witch like powers. Edward and the woman named Asenath develop a relationship. quickly Edward is pulled into researching and learning about dark arts. You eventually find out that Asenath's intentions are not entirely pure, and Edward begins to loose his mind. For plot I give the story 5 stars Enjoyed the cosmic horror elements and the cult storyline. Writing 4 stars this one by Lovecraft was more palatable and easy to read. Enjoyed the character work and the overall storyline was kind of terrifying. The opening line was absolutely amazing. "it is true that I sent six bullets through the head of my best friend, and yet I hope to show in this statement that I am not his murderer." Horror 4 stars feel that the horror in this story best represents why love crafts work lives on. It honestly was a great Horror Story. Fun 4 stars was a quick read and definitely worth picking up Overall this was a good Lovecraft story 👍

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    Part of the Complete Works of H.P. Lovecraft , which can be found formatted for Nook and Kindle on CthulhuChick.com. Synopsis: The Thing on the Doorstep is a short story written by H.P. Lovecraft, part of the Cthulhu Mythos universe of horror fiction. It was written in August 1933, and first published in the January 1937 issue of Weird Tales. Daniel Upton, the story's narrator, begins by telling that he has killed his best friend, Edward Derby, and that he hopes his account will prove that he i Part of the Complete Works of H.P. Lovecraft , which can be found formatted for Nook and Kindle on CthulhuChick.com. Synopsis: The Thing on the Doorstep is a short story written by H.P. Lovecraft, part of the Cthulhu Mythos universe of horror fiction. It was written in August 1933, and first published in the January 1937 issue of Weird Tales. Daniel Upton, the story's narrator, begins by telling that he has killed his best friend, Edward Derby, and that he hopes his account will prove that he is not a murderer... My Thoughts: Another cautionary tale about the dangers of meddling with things beyond your ability to comprehend, about the dangers of those "from outside", and another in the Innsmouth cycle of stories. Wonderfully creepy! You can't go wrong with this great story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Iulian

    Terrific writing and atmosphere, as in Lovecraft's usual trademarks. As I am a fan of horror films in general - though haven't read many horror stories - I looked up if someone did adapt this eerie and tremble inducing short tale. There is indeed a quite recent adaptation from 2014 and the overall score of 3,7 out of 10 on Imdb doesn't necessarily hold me up in seeing it, near future-wise. I consider that as being called "diversity", in seeing both great films and utterly garbage ones ha ha. Mos Terrific writing and atmosphere, as in Lovecraft's usual trademarks. As I am a fan of horror films in general - though haven't read many horror stories - I looked up if someone did adapt this eerie and tremble inducing short tale. There is indeed a quite recent adaptation from 2014 and the overall score of 3,7 out of 10 on Imdb doesn't necessarily hold me up in seeing it, near future-wise. I consider that as being called "diversity", in seeing both great films and utterly garbage ones ha ha. Mostly curious if the film would capture that ever present feeling of dread and unease from the book...and how the characters' dynamics are portrayed, we shall see.

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