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Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes

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It's hard to overestimate the importance of the family, and that of fathers in particular. We've heard it said, "As the family goes, so goes the nation." But it can also be said that "as the father goes, so goes the family." Consequently, Voddie Baucham has set out to teach men how to faithfully shepherd their families. Derived from Baucham's monthly meetings with men in hi It's hard to overestimate the importance of the family, and that of fathers in particular. We've heard it said, "As the family goes, so goes the nation." But it can also be said that "as the father goes, so goes the family." Consequently, Voddie Baucham has set out to teach men how to faithfully shepherd their families. Derived from Baucham's monthly meetings with men in his church, Family Shepherds calls men to accountability for their God-given responsibilities in their homes. Baucham's clear style and practical approach will spur men to protect their marriage, raise kingdom-minded children, value the synergy between church and home, and navigate difficult family dynamics. Family Shepherds is a book for any husband or father looking to lead well, and it will serve as an excellent resource for churches looking to equip the men in their congregations.


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It's hard to overestimate the importance of the family, and that of fathers in particular. We've heard it said, "As the family goes, so goes the nation." But it can also be said that "as the father goes, so goes the family." Consequently, Voddie Baucham has set out to teach men how to faithfully shepherd their families. Derived from Baucham's monthly meetings with men in hi It's hard to overestimate the importance of the family, and that of fathers in particular. We've heard it said, "As the family goes, so goes the nation." But it can also be said that "as the father goes, so goes the family." Consequently, Voddie Baucham has set out to teach men how to faithfully shepherd their families. Derived from Baucham's monthly meetings with men in his church, Family Shepherds calls men to accountability for their God-given responsibilities in their homes. Baucham's clear style and practical approach will spur men to protect their marriage, raise kingdom-minded children, value the synergy between church and home, and navigate difficult family dynamics. Family Shepherds is a book for any husband or father looking to lead well, and it will serve as an excellent resource for churches looking to equip the men in their congregations.

30 review for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vini

    This was the first book that I listened to of Baucham Jr. He’s definitely a great author. Specifically, he discusses the importance of the male to understand his role as the head and to lead his family as the head in such a way as to glorify God. He hits many points in marriage and raising children and highlights the male role in these important areas of life. I would definitely recommend giving this book a listen.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Riding

    Family Shepherds is a book that instructs men on becoming wise, biblically sound leaders of their families. Yet much of the teaching in this book is applicable to the lives of many, especially when it comes to the foundations of our beliefs and how we should evaluate our lifestyle. If you want sound theology being applied to a modern lifestyle, this is an ideal book to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Evan Steele

    When I realized that there was a follow-up to "Family Driven Faith" it immediately shot up my want-to-read list, and while I don't think this book is as good as FDF, it was an encouraging and reinforcing reminder of the Christian father's role in the spiritual training in their home. I want to start with the negative, this book suffers most from a lack of focus. Bauchum does not seem to have a clear audience in mind. He bounces between speaking directly to the average Christian father and making When I realized that there was a follow-up to "Family Driven Faith" it immediately shot up my want-to-read list, and while I don't think this book is as good as FDF, it was an encouraging and reinforcing reminder of the Christian father's role in the spiritual training in their home. I want to start with the negative, this book suffers most from a lack of focus. Bauchum does not seem to have a clear audience in mind. He bounces between speaking directly to the average Christian father and making theological appeals to church leaders. I thought the book dragged in the unnecessary dive into Calvanism vs Pelagianism and the random asides about how the church should handle politics etc. These minor critics do not make it a bad book in any sense but it will keep me from buying several to hand out. Overall, this is a helpful and enjoyable reinforcement of the ideas in Family Driven Faith. I would still recommend everyone to read that book first, this was an enjoyable second act. I enjoy getting to spend time with Voddie. His bold challenges for Christian fathers to step up rather than rely on ministers and social workers are inspiring. I owe much of my current success to the path he helped map out for me. I would recommend this book to Christian fathers and church leaders looking for information about leading family men well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tim Zornes

    Baucham nails it. Fatherhood is a high calling and Voddie gives great encouragement, sufficient warnings, and biblical perspective on shepherding a family.

  5. 5 out of 5

    John

    Voddie leaves behind some of his traditional decisive language to call men to step up as heads of households. It was in typical Voddie style, challenging and convicting. The most helpful portions were the two chapters on formative and corrective discipline. Interestingly, he takes Michael Pearl and To Train up a Child, a pillar of the homeschool movement, to task. Voddie was admittedly a proponent of the book only a couple years ago but has soured on it after another close read. He calls Pearl a Voddie leaves behind some of his traditional decisive language to call men to step up as heads of households. It was in typical Voddie style, challenging and convicting. The most helpful portions were the two chapters on formative and corrective discipline. Interestingly, he takes Michael Pearl and To Train up a Child, a pillar of the homeschool movement, to task. Voddie was admittedly a proponent of the book only a couple years ago but has soured on it after another close read. He calls Pearl a behavioral Pelagian who misunderstands the Gospel and has effectively lead a generation of parents astray. Family Shepherds is by far the most Gospel saturated of his books. To his credit, he has clearly listened to the critiques of his views and takes great pains to clarify his ecclesiology and soteriology. In attempt to do so however, I found the book very disjointed and fragmented. It seemed to be almost an anthology of his views on marriage, biblical leadership, multigenerational discipleship vs. peer to peer, the Gospel, church membership, the Kingdom. I agree with all of what he says but each chapter could have been a book in itself. One has to wonder if Voddie, desperate to bridge the doctrinally-sound family integrated community with more mainstream evangelical leaders was simply extending an olive branch through this publication. He quotes many modern and Puritan leaders. It read almost like a vision of ministry rather than a cohesive and practical argument for a return to biblical male headship. I think Family Driven Faith was a much better book but if you're looking for a flyover of various issues facing the church today, this is a fruitful and easy read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben House

    Some men from my church met together for breakfast and a discussion about this book for three weeks. It was a great resource for that type of study. Along with the discussion, reading the book on my own was a great reminder of many Biblical truths and injunctions about the role of fathers. Although Pastor Baucham talks about how much of what he is saying is alien to many church-going men, my experience has been different. I have been a part of four churches since my college days. While none were Some men from my church met together for breakfast and a discussion about this book for three weeks. It was a great resource for that type of study. Along with the discussion, reading the book on my own was a great reminder of many Biblical truths and injunctions about the role of fathers. Although Pastor Baucham talks about how much of what he is saying is alien to many church-going men, my experience has been different. I have been a part of four churches since my college days. While none were perfect, all strove to emphasize the role of fathers in the family. But even though I have been well taught and mentored, I needed to be reminded of the lessons of this book. And even though my children are in their upper teens and twenties, I need to be called to account for my role as the family shepherd.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tim Brady

    Much of this was inspiring and thought provoking, but some also seemed out of place, too deep, or out dated. I couldn’t tell who he thought his audience was as he bounced between simple English and very deep and complex seminary level Christian-ese. The concept was clear, but I didn’t always agree with his conclusion or actions. I would recommend this book as a good conversation starter, but not necessarily a word for word book to live by.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Levi

    3.5 Faithful biblical insights and application. Some theological vernacular may frustrate the “typical” church member.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    It was mostly ok but felt like he could have made it better by not trying to cover as much basic christian doctrine. Also spent a whole chapter pushing a particular ministry philosophy related to husbands/fathers being the main disciplers in the church. On only level I sympathize with some of what he said there but he goes way beyond what I think is biblically warranted.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    I love Voddie so anything he puts out I pick up. This challenged me as a Father and made me evaluate how intentional I was at shepherding my family.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dustin Armstrong

    If you are a husband, father, church leader, or aspire to be any of these things, you need to read this book. This book is a drink of cold water for men trying to figure out how to navigate leading their family in a biblical and God honoring way.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hahn Bielfeldt

    Allow me to preface this review by stating that it is cursory and is by no means an in-depth, critical review of the book. Voddie has been (and continues to be) a herald of clear, Gospel truth applied in a multiplicity of areas (cultural apologetics, race & justice, pastoral ministry) and in this book, with family & parenting. I’ll list its particular strengths, weaknesses, and my overall impression after reading through it. STRENGTHS Voddie makes a strong case for the vital importance of the fat Allow me to preface this review by stating that it is cursory and is by no means an in-depth, critical review of the book. Voddie has been (and continues to be) a herald of clear, Gospel truth applied in a multiplicity of areas (cultural apologetics, race & justice, pastoral ministry) and in this book, with family & parenting. I’ll list its particular strengths, weaknesses, and my overall impression after reading through it. STRENGTHS Voddie makes a strong case for the vital importance of the father’s role as a family shepherd. So much of the health and vitality of a marriage and family depends upon a father who takes seriously his sober calling to lead and love his wife and shepherd his children. He makes a strong, compelling, biblical case for fathers to pursue what God has called them to be: family shepherds, leaders of their homes, and the primary disciple-makers of their children. With each chapter, one feels the weight and responsibility of fathering and the sober calling to be a family shepherd. This calling is for all fathers, all husbands, all dads; not for the ones who are really passionate about their faith, really involved in their church, and really read their Bible. The calling is for all fathers. Don’t expect your church or the youth pastor to disciple your children for you. Family shepherds who raise their children to love Lord are raising a generation whom God will use to change the world. For a father who is uncertain about his role as a husband and dad, this book is a must read. WEAKNESSES: I gave this book three stars for a number of reasons; some stylistic, and some theological. First, stylistic weaknesses. Despite how strong of a case this book is for the necessity of fathers to be family shepherds, it is severely lacking in tangible application points. Nearly every chapter, particularly the ones on formative and corrective discipline, I found myself wanting. The comment that I wrote most often in the margins was, “okay, so what does this look like?” As a new dad, I was eager to read of examples of what male headship or family catechism looked like. I was found wanting. Every chapter is a sort of mini-polemic for its topic and importance. As a reader who already affirms its importance and in theological alignment with most of the views, I wanted to read about what x looked like in a regular week. Voddie often makes the point that to shepherd is to both teach and to model. This book is a case of the former and severely lacking the latter. Voddie occasionally has a theological soapbox moment throughout the book. For example, he raises disagreement on age-segregated ministry, youth ministers, and childrens’ ministers, citing that such offices are not found in the pages of the New Testament. The modern advent of age-segregated ministry has led to parents taking a back seat concerning the discipleship and formation of their children. These “soapbox” moments are more confusing than helpful. The uncritical reader is left with the impression that youth groups are unbiblical at best and bad at worst, and these comments are better suited for a separate chapter or book. The overall style of argument is “if you neglect to pursue virtue x, consequence y will happen.” This style of argument creates the gravity of the sober calling to be a family shepherd. And yes, and amen, neglect to pursue the calling to love your wives and disciple your children does have serious consequences indeed. For a dad who is resigned or absent, such a sober warning is exactly what he needs to hear to stir him to action. However, I found that this style of argument consistent throughout the book creates a sort of fear-based approach to shepherding, rather than one of joy and delight compounded with sober responsibility. if I as a dad neglect x, y and z, there are severe implications and consequences on my family, so I better do them. True, but I don’t think this style of argument is compelling, as the world is full of the consequences of fathers not loving & discipling their children. What would have made this book more compelling is an argument for the joy, privilege, and fruits of being a family shepherd. I finished the book and wanted to ask Voddie, “what fruit have you seen God produce in your family as a result of being a family shepherd? What do you love the most? What has brought you the most joy, the best memories?” Second, theological weaknesses. His theological soapbox moments on age-segregated ministry reflect a church polity that views any constructed office beyond what is explicitly stated in the New Testament as unbiblical. Thus, youth pastors, children’s ministers, young adults pastors, etc are unbiblical church offices. What is meant by unbiblical? Wrong? Or beyond the bounds of the New Testament? Thus, by extension, are admin assistants, secretaries, librarians, facilities staff, etc also unbiblical? In the chapter on church membership, Voddie cites Eph. 4 in the context of a healthy ecclesiology. Listed are the various offices of apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, and teacher. Thus, by Voddie’s hermeneutic, churches ought not only to have the office of pastors/elder/overseer & deacon, but also apostle, prophet, evangelist, and teacher. Yet most churches do not affirm all of these as official church offices. Thus creates the need for these soapbox moments to be relegated to another book altogether. Baucham’s chapter on corrective discipline makes a polemic for corporal punishment (e.g. spanking) hinging on a literal interpretation of “the rod” from a number of verses chiefly from Proverbs. Yes, parents are biblically commanded to discipline their children, which includes spanking, however, Baucham’s brevity due to what is “clear” from the text is simplistic and somewhat problematic rather than helpful. For ex, by a literal interpretation, what type of rod ought to be used? Ought a father strike his child on the back as the text of Proverbs says, or on the buttocks, as is most commonly practiced? What does a father do if spanking is ineffective (it certainly was ineffective for me when I was a child!)? Baucham’s argument essentially is if you’re not spanking you’re doing it wrong. This ignores and dismisses the value of other forms of discipline that are equally, if not more effective than spanking. IMPRESSIONS: Voddie’s book tells me I need to be a family shepherd. I must be one. I am called by God to be one for my wife and my children. Yes, and amen. I agree wholeheartedly. Lord, make me into a shepherd for my family. This book lays in me a strong sense of duty, responsibility, and sobriety. Voddie says many things in this book that provoked my spirit to rise up within me and say, “Yes, Lord, I long to be like this, and I rise to the challenge!” However, it lays a very weak sense of the joy and delight in doing so. I would recommend this book to the man who is eager to learn more about what it means to be a husband, father, and church member because he knows very little about it. I would not recommend it to the one is motivated and zealous for these things who is looking for practical ways to work them out in his own marriage and family. Overall, this book is very good, and if it were more carefully and practically written, I would have given it a higher rating. Despite that, I think it should be a must-read for every Christian husband and father.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    It took me way too long to get around to reading this book. If you can only read one Voddie Baucham book, then read Family Driven Faith. If you’re looking for a second, this is probably the one (especially as a nice follow-up to the first). This book’s primary audience is fathers (and good for prospective fathers and mentors) and is an excellent tool to remind us of our role as our family’s shepherd. Baucham breaks the book into logical sections, from the Biblical view of the family, to the need It took me way too long to get around to reading this book. If you can only read one Voddie Baucham book, then read Family Driven Faith. If you’re looking for a second, this is probably the one (especially as a nice follow-up to the first). This book’s primary audience is fathers (and good for prospective fathers and mentors) and is an excellent tool to remind us of our role as our family’s shepherd. Baucham breaks the book into logical sections, from the Biblical view of the family, to the need to prioritize our marriage, to the training and discipline of our children. It’s quite practical and often convicting. This book won’t be without controversy. Today’s cultural climate (corporal punishment, for example), but Baucham’s intent is to be true to Scripture. My biggest critique is he references objections to some of his points and attempts to address them; however, in some cases (e.g., male headship—cultural/temporal injunction) he barely scratches the surface or only generally responds with little substance or support. While not the focus, if he’s going to specifically call out objections, he can spend more than a few sentences on it. In the grand scheme, this is minor; however, it did stand out to me as a deficiency.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt Lee

    Although this book is specifically addressed to men's role in the home, its firm foundation in, and explanation of, the Bible's prescription for marriage and the family means the book useful for wives and mothers in joining with their husbands in the task. Voddie opens with a much needed discourse on the necessity of equipping men as family shepherds, and the subsequent need of discipleship. The foundation is based on the 'three legged stool' of discipleship from Titus: 1. Godly, mature men and Although this book is specifically addressed to men's role in the home, its firm foundation in, and explanation of, the Bible's prescription for marriage and the family means the book useful for wives and mothers in joining with their husbands in the task. Voddie opens with a much needed discourse on the necessity of equipping men as family shepherds, and the subsequent need of discipleship. The foundation is based on the 'three legged stool' of discipleship from Titus: 1. Godly, mature men and women in the church 2. Godly, manly pastors and elders 3. Biblically functioning homes The main focus of the book is on the third of these, but I think Voddie does well to note that all three are needed for effective, Biblical discipleship. Moreover, the training and discipling of children does not happen outside of the paradigm of these three aspects of discipleship working together. Having established the basis and context in which family shepherds are to work, Voddie splits the actually day - to - day role of the family shepherd into three further sections. The first is on teaching, instruction, and evangelism in the home. He calls for fathers to proclaim the Gospel at home; discipling their wives; discipling their children. He advocates strongly not just for passive instruction, but active instruction - taking time aside to read the Scriptures and pray in acts of family worship. He also advocates strongly for the 'old fashioned' practice of catechesis and explains why it is beneficial - not just for the catechumen (student/child) but also the catechiser (teacher/parent). The second was on the primacy of marriage. Voddie makes a great point about marriage being the foundation of the family, and not the other way around. Staying together 'for the kids' is not a Biblical form of marriage, and does not help to raise good future husbands or wives ourselves. Moreover, a family shepherd's job isn't simply to 'not get divorced' but to actively disciple wife and children; hanging on until the children leave is not effective discipleship and does not epitomise the self - sacrificial love found in Christ's relationship with His bride. Included in this chapter is a discussion of male headship in the home, and Voddie (as expected by any already familiar with anything else he has ever written or spoken on!) categorically affirms it and helps Christians navigate the modern challenges to the notion. Helpfully, Voddie points to some areas where modern radical feminism has invaded our culture so much so as to make the idea of 'headship' repulsive to us on first reading. He is fantastically helpful on this issue. One odd phrase he uses in this section is about submission as a modelled for us by Christ. His point overall is good - Christ was (and is) equal to the Father, and in submitting to the Father (as He does in the garden of Gethsemane) it does not mean that Jesus is less than the Father. However, in explaining this, Voddie does say "there is headship in the Trinity" (p. 107). In the context of his point, the charitable reading to assume he is talking about the economic relationship of the Trinity, whereby the Son submits to the Father as mediator of the Covenant of Grace. However, since there were no clarifying statements, the stand-alone phrase may imply a headship in the onotological Trinity (or, indeed, other readers may assume this upon reading that section). I am not sure entirely on Dr. Baucham's position on the ESS/EFS debate, but this is a troublesome statement all the same. The third section is on the discipline of children. I found this the most helpful section of the book, as it contained the most amount of practical advice, as well as the theological and epistemological framework that family shepherds ought to have. Voddie makes a distinction between 'formative' and 'corrective' discipline. Although I am not sure I agree fully on his stance on smacking as a form of corporal punishment, his point that we ought to spend far more time on formative than corrective discipline was a sound one. The anthropological stance he takes here is what makes this section excellent. Voddie dispels the myth of the moral neutrality of children, and insists that we recognise them as sinners in their nature. As such, they need to be taught where their actions transgress God's Law and, as an implementation of grace, be given the chance to repent. This should be done mostly in private, and without embarrassment to the child, but also should take a lead from your own modelling of this principle: "The way you handle your own sin and failings in part of what you're to model before you children. They need to see you fall on the sword when you've blown it. They need to hear heartfelt, unsolicited repentance from you. They have as their ultimate model one who lived a perfect life - and you're not that one. You merely point them to *Him*" (p. 130) The final section is on lifestyle evaluation. The first chapter in this section on church membership is outstanding. The necessity and centrality of church membership, and the reasons that it is so important, are highlighted in a convincing manner. Voddie makes the excellent point that parents can worry about the fact that their children don't go to church when they grow up because they have never been taught why church membership matters! Voddie concludes by looking at how we are to honour God with our time and pursuits in leisure, the workplace, and finances. There is a final 'special concern' chapter at the end of the book at is very pastorally minded and addresses the issue of single mothers. Voddie outlines how family, and in places, the church community can help single mothers in the difficulties that come with single parenting. The book is well written and concise. Whilst this is a strength of the book, I felt that I would have benefited more from an expansion in some points, and some more practical advice on the implementation of an excellently argued worldview.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sims Jones

    Full Disclosure: I was a part of the Launch Team and received a free copy of the book in advance in exchange for an honest review. The opinion expressed below is my own. "...I am not writing this book to stop the divide. I am writing to clearly identify the two sides of the fault lne and to urge the reader to choose wisely." (Pg. 6) "I want this book to be a clarion call. I want to unmask the ideology of Critical Theory, Critical Race Theory, and Intersectionality in hopes that those who have im Full Disclosure: I was a part of the Launch Team and received a free copy of the book in advance in exchange for an honest review. The opinion expressed below is my own. "...I am not writing this book to stop the divide. I am writing to clearly identify the two sides of the fault lne and to urge the reader to choose wisely." (Pg. 6) "I want this book to be a clarion call. I want to unmask the ideology of Critical Theory, Critical Race Theory, and Intersectionality in hopes that those who have imbibed it can have the blinders removed from their eyes, and those who have bowed in the face of it can stand up, take courage, and 'contend for the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints'" (Pg. 230) These quotes from the beginning and ending of the book sum up the important task Voddie Baucham has taking up in Fault Lines: The Social Justice Movement and Evangelicalism's Looming Catastrophe. In 233 pages over 11 chapters, not including Appendices, Dr. Baucham clearly defines the nature of Critical Social Justice, shows how and why it is different than Biblical Justice, and offers a roadmap to guide pastors like myself who must address this issue. First he gets personal. In Chapter 1 Dr. Baucham tells his own story, describing the poverty and racism he expressed. He talks of growing up in a single parent home, but with a mother committed to his success. He lived through desegregation and busing. He was robbed at gunpoint and lived in a rough neighborhood. Voddie has seen injustice and the worst of society, yet ultimately prospered because of the favor of God and a caring mother. His life shows that society or "the system" is in fact not the final determiner of one's outcome. In Chapter 2 Dr. Baucham tells of how is came to Christ and sent many years in and Afrocentric Christianity. He worked in various group homes with kids whose upbringing matched his own. He speaks of being welcomed and promoted in the SBC until he made two errors: Supported a boycott of Disney over its pro-LGBT agenda (pg 30) and identifying as a Calvinist (pg 32). The response to Voddie proved he was anything but a token. What truly caught Voddie's attention was when the SBC apologized for racist history in 1995. This brought conviction to Dr. Baucham because he realized no black pastors were passionate about racial reconciliation. Finally his trip to Africa was life changing. Voddie wrote all of this to make the point that he has walked the walk, not just talked the talk. He has "lived experience". He is not blind to the reality of “racism” or the ways of this sinful world. Yet he understands, and seeks to help us understand, that the solution offered by Critical Social Justice does more harm than good. Let us get into the meat of the book. In Chapter 3 - Seeking True Justice - Voddie begins by making it clear that God hates both injustice and falsehoods and lies. Biblical Justice demands truth. Critical Social Justice entails both of the evils hated by God. To demonstrate this point, Voddie examines well known cases such as George Floyd and Michael Brown and Breonna Taylor among others, as well as cases with similar circumstances but with white victims. His point is that CSJ advocates don't care about all cases, just those that fit their narrative. He also shows the danger of univariate analysis to make arguments when more complex analysis is needed. CSJ also takes aim at objective truth and facts, condemning them as "white supremacy" and oppressive. CSJ like to ignore facts of consider such principles such as what is laid out in Proverbs 18:13,17 and Leviticus 19:15. He makes the important point that "People are ignoring these principles because the standard of justice upon which their pleas are built does not come from the God of the Scriptures" (Pg. 44). CSJ is antithetical to true justice. In Chapters 4 – 6: Voddie lays out the contours of this new religion, and make no mistake it is a new religion, for us to understand. CSJ has its own anthropology – BIPOC are oppressed and whites are oppressors, original sin or racism, law of antiracism, gospel of racial reconciliation, canon of scripture comprising CSJ literature, prophets like DiAngelo and Kendi and so forth. The new priesthood consists of minorities who are the sole meditators of truth based of skin color, “oppressed” status, and “lived experiences”. He introduces and / or reintroduces the term he coined a few years ago, “Ethnic Gnosticism”. He points out the racist notation of the sole black perspective and how this must be maintained at all cost. In Chapters 7 – 9: He details the damage CRT can do / has done. He shows how it ignores the greatest evil of our time, abortion. He knocks down the myth of the single-issue voter and how the setting aside of the abortion issue to support candidates how condone evil is the natural consequence of CRT/I. He makes the important point that there is a lack of clarity and charity at both sides and reviews the Dallas Statement on Social Justice and the story the SBC resolution 9 of CRT/I, specifically how it was watered down. In Chapters 10 – 11: He provides guidance for restoration and repairing the damage CRT/I CSJ has done. He shows how CSJ is opposed to Christianity and how BLM, both the organization and the phrase, at based on lies. He closes with encouragement that the gates of hell will not prevail against the church of Christ. I was pleased to be a part of the Launch Team. Dr Baucham writes in an irenic, pastoral style with a lost for those who have been taking in by this false gospel. He is careful to cite primary sources, not press the data beyond where it can go, and provides the best introduction for those seeking to understand this ideology and / or are confused by its redefinition of gospel terms. I heartily commend this book to all and will use this material in any sermon / teaching I do one CRT/I CSJ with my congregation. God bless All. Pastor Sims Jones For His Glory and Holiness Ministries McAllen, TX.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Leandro Dutra

    A very good call for fathers (and single mothers) to shepherd their families. Which incidentally would make churches more like communities and less like clubs or enterprises. Deeply felt, well founded in both Scripture and the history of the Church, pointing to precious other resources. A minor grip: it consistently uses ‘principle’ (which would mean fundament) where it meant ‘principal’ (meaning proeminent). Together with colloquialisms such as using ‘impact’ everywhere where ‘change’, ‘effect’ A very good call for fathers (and single mothers) to shepherd their families. Which incidentally would make churches more like communities and less like clubs or enterprises. Deeply felt, well founded in both Scripture and the history of the Church, pointing to precious other resources. A minor grip: it consistently uses ‘principle’ (which would mean fundament) where it meant ‘principal’ (meaning proeminent). Together with colloquialisms such as using ‘impact’ everywhere where ‘change’, ‘effect’ or ‘impression’ would be better, it detracts from otherwise a very well edited and printed work.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Max

    I read Family Shepherds because I wanted to help in leading and caring for my family of now 6. I felt like I needed clear cut direction with scriptural support. This book did exactly that. The chapters were short, to the point, and clearly laid out the call on fathers to shepherd their families and how they should go about doing that.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael T Moos

    Use of time, disciplining children, family worship, teaching your household Scripture and catechism, what a biblical husband should be, being a single mother family shepherd, church membership...You will find more major areas addressed in this book on what a biblical family shepherd should look like.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Where are the Shepherds of the Family? A Book Review of Family Shepherds Since May of 2011 I have had the privilege of reviewing 14 books on various topics and of different genre, and from various publishers. I am honored to have this opportunity, and humbled that my opinion is of value to you who have read my various book reviews. I owe a special thanks to my friend and Christian Brother, Dave Jenkins, who was willing to contact Crossway and let them know that I would be honored to review for th Where are the Shepherds of the Family? A Book Review of Family Shepherds Since May of 2011 I have had the privilege of reviewing 14 books on various topics and of different genre, and from various publishers. I am honored to have this opportunity, and humbled that my opinion is of value to you who have read my various book reviews. I owe a special thanks to my friend and Christian Brother, Dave Jenkins, who was willing to contact Crossway and let them know that I would be honored to review for them as well. Thank you Brother. Dave and I have a lot of similar interests in books, and the book I’m writing on today is no different. I have just finished reading Family Shepherds by Dr. Voddie Baucham Jr. Dr. Baucham is a pastor at a Church here in my area. He serves as the preaching pastor at Grace Family Baptist Church out of Spring, TX. It is possible I have met Dr. Baucham as he is a shopper at a Christian retail location where I work. I don’t recall if I have or not, but it is exciting that there is a chance if I haven’t I someday may. I usually select books that interest me to review for the various publishers. I figure if I am going to take the time to read a book then it should be something that can give me some practical guidance for where I am at in my life. Family Shepherds falls well within this category. As a husband and father of five I am always trying to see the best way to serve and to lead my family in the path of righteousness and to deepen their love for our LORD and Savior Jesus Christ. Deuteronomy 6:4-9 is a passage that every father/family shepherd should know, for in it we see the very foundation of why we should be the family shepherd. Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all you soul and with all your might. And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. You shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes. You shall write them on the doorposts of you house and on your gates. (Englsih Standard Version 2001) One of the key words in this passage is the word “command”. God did not ask us to teach our children, He commanded that we do so. It is with this premise that Dr. Baucham begins to write Family Shepherds. In Family Shepherds Dr. Baucham breaks the roles of the Family Shepherd into four key areas. These four key areas break down like this; first, family discipleship and evangelism; second, marriage enrichment; third, the training and discipline of children; and finally, the need for lifestyle evaluation. Since my job is to get you interested in the book we are only going to take a look at a couple of these areas momentarily, and then you’ll have to read the rest. I write out this key passage from Deuteronomy not just to challenge you, but to challenge myself. This is how I felt as I began to read this newest book from Voddie. How am I doing in discipleship and evangelism? Is my marriage stronger now than it was ten years ago? Am I training my children as I ought, teaching them the need of salvation for the deliverance of their sin, or am I teaching behavioral/morality changes without the necessary authority and need of Christ as LORD of their lives? Dr. Baucham quotes Charles Hodge, a well known theologian in the mid-nineteenth century (Baucham, Voddie 2011) who said: “The character of the Church and of the state depends on the character of the family. If religion dies out in the family, it cannot elsewhere be maintained.” (Hodge 1871) If fathers are not doing the job God entrusted them with, then we are only leading to our own demise. In his section on Family Discipleship and Evangelism Dr. Baucham discusses the benefit and purpose of having a family catechism. The idea of a catechism has been part of the Church for probably centuries, and was used by Catholic and Protestant Theologians alike. To be honest when I first saw this chapter on catechism I was about ready to skip it. However, I decided to read it because I was curious about what Dr. Baucham’s thoughts where on this idea. First, for those who maybe aren’t familiar with the term catechism let me first use Dr. Baucham’s explanation. “It is simply a pedagogical method employing questions and answers to teach a set body of knowledge. Ultimately, it is a means of teaching Christian doctrine in a concise, repetitive manner. (Baucham, Voddie 2011) Although a very foreign concept in today’s modern day Protestants the catechism was used by great Protestant theologians such as Martin Luther and Jonathan Edwards. I am blessed to have in my possession a copy of Luther’s small catechism that belonged to my father. My wife and I are in discussion in to implementing a catechism in our house thanks to this section of Family Shepherds. Another powerful section of Family Shepherds is the section on the training and discipline of children. This is a very hotly contested area especially in light of the post-modern day view of “love and tolerance”. So often we hear people say we shouldn’t judge, we need to let our children make their own decisions, so forth and so forth. To the secular world the very idea of a “family shepherd” is counter-intuitive, yet as we see crime rates grow, never has something been more important than the role of fathers raising their children. In Christianity especially there are two authors who have addressed the specific topic of discipline and training of children; Michael Pearl and his book To Train a Child and Tedd Tripp and his book Shepherding a Child’s Heart. Again I own a copy of both of these books so when I came to chapter 10 I came to it with an understanding of both of the trains of thought represented by these two authors. Between these two authors there is a major difference that I noticed as did Voddie. First Michael Pearl has the philosophy that “training doesn’t necessarily require that the trainee has reason; even mice and rats can be trained to respond to stimuli.” (Pearl 1994) However, Tedd Tripp starts off his book this way, “The Scripture teaches that the heart is the control center for life.” (Tripp 1995) One doesn’t have to look very far to spot the vast difference between these two authors. Michael Pearl believes you can teach behavior through stimuli while Tedd Tripp points to the fact that the heart is the control center of a person’s life which means to train them up you must address the heart. In Family Shepherds Dr. Baucham says this, “We must have a grasp on our children’s greatest need if we ever hope to see it met.” (Baucham, Voddie 2011) I would be lying to say that this did not strike me right between the eyes. So often when I train or discipline my children, I’m not focusing on the control center of their lives, their hearts, I’m focusing on what makes me happy. If we as fathers are only focusing on behavior or morals, then we do not love our children as Christ loved us. If we are focusing on behavior or morals then we are not training up our children to love the LORD with all of their heart and all their soul and all their might. Jeremiah 17:9 tells us that “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it?” (Englsih Standard Version 2001) Matthew 12:34 says, “You brood of vipers! How can you speak good, when you are evil? For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks.” (Englsih Standard Version 2001) If we as fathers do not address the heart of our children, and strive to lead them to saving faith in Jesus Christ, then we are shepherds who have failed. Dr. Baucham quotes the great Puritan preacher Jonathan Edwards (Baucham, Voddie 2011) who said, “How few are there who are thorough in maintaining order and government in their families! How is family-government in a great measure vanished! And how many are as likely to bring a curse upon their families, as Eli.” (Edwards 1835) Dr. Baucham is a huge proponent of the age-integrated congregation. What this means is that his Church does not practice such things as nursery, children’s church, youth group, or even Men or Women’s Bible studies, although they do have a monthly Men’s meeting. I do not agree with Dr. Baucham on this of course, and in fact want to point out what I see as a slight contradiction in his book. First, he says this: Virtually all the debate over the discipleship of young people begins with the assumption that church structures and programs such as the nursery, children’s church, Sunday school, and youth group are foundational discipleship tools and whatever happens must take place within that framework. (Baucham, Voddie 2011) I disagree with this assumption, and would in fact argue that these programs and church structures are helpful, and can serve as a supplemental, not a foundational discipleship tool. More so I believe that Dr. Baucham contradicts himself only three pages later when he says, “We do not rely either on the pulpit or on the home. Both institutions are charged to play their role.” (Baucham, Voddie 2011) This being said however, I do find this to be a book that every Church leader, father, mother, and Church staff should read. I agree with the premise that discipleship ultimately rests in the home. As one looks at the direction society is taking there is no doubt in my mind that it is time for the father to be his family’s shepherd. From where I stand, even though I may not agree with everything that Dr. Voddie Baucham believes I still see this book as a must read, and gladly rate it 5 out of 5. I’m honored to have added this book to my library and look forward to reading through it again and again as Dr. Baucham helps teach me and all men how to be Family Shepherds. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Crossway as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” Works Cited Baucham, Voddie. Family Shepherds. Wheaton: Crossway, 2011. Edwards, Jonathan. "Christian Cautions: or, The Necessity of Self-Examination." In The Works of Jonathan Edwards, 1:183. New York: Daniel Appleton and Co., 1835. Englsih Standard Version. Crossway Bibles, 2001. Hodge, Charles. Systematic Theology. Vol. 3. New York: C. Scribner, 1871. Pearl, Michael. To Train Up a Child. Pleasantville: NGJ Ministries, 1994. Tripp, Tedd. Shepherding a Child's Heart. Wapwallopen: Shpherd Press, 1995.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brian Cain

    A clear understanding of Biblical principles and great advice for new and old husbands & fathers.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Thouron

    I am in step with Baucham with his call to action on family religion. I especially thought his chapter on formative discipline and his chapter on family religion were persuasive and galvanizing. I saw his family dysfunction example as spot-on, especially for what I see in the evangelical church (of which I am a part). The reason for 2 stars: On page 105 Baucham says "However, Paul's statement is at the end of a paragraph (Eph 5:15-21). Thus, 5:21 is an introductory statement that explains submissi I am in step with Baucham with his call to action on family religion. I especially thought his chapter on formative discipline and his chapter on family religion were persuasive and galvanizing. I saw his family dysfunction example as spot-on, especially for what I see in the evangelical church (of which I am a part). The reason for 2 stars: On page 105 Baucham says "However, Paul's statement is at the end of a paragraph (Eph 5:15-21). Thus, 5:21 is an introductory statement that explains submission of believers in three contexts--wives to husbands..., children to parents..., and slaves to masters." Baucham is a gifted pastor, extremely intelligent, and intentional with his words. I find it quite unreasonable that Baucham is not aware that paragraphs, punctation and word spacings are not part of the original text. I also find it quite unreasonable--and even disingenuous--to neglect that chapter breaks are modern, and that section titles are an interpretation by modern translators. Furthermore, Baucham chooses passages from Bible translations because they reinforce his preconceived ideas: for example, his discussion on page 140 called "Family Shepherds Must See Spanking As Literal" and page 142 where "Family Shepherds Must See Spanking as Necessary." Choosing a Bible translation solely because it supports your existing interpretation is dangerous. The translation here is the ESV; it actually makes me question the veracity of the ESV translation if unique (called "novel" translations by Baucham) interpretations in the translation are vehemently supported by those who agree with the translation, despite their novelty. Because of this open bias, it is difficult to trust Baucham's honesty when teaching about already controversial topics such as marriage-- especially his refutation of egalitarianism--and child rearing (specifically his section on "corrective discipline"). Why I almost gave 1 star: 1) On page 34 (and in a couple other areas), Baucham seems to be advocating that women & girls should primarily learn about Jesus at home, instead of wherever men & boys learn about Jesus. (He draws a clear distinction based on sex.) 2) On page 85, in the section titled "Active Sanctification" Baucham says A) "By Active Sancitification, I mean those things God directs us to do...with a view towards sanctification of our spouse...", B) "The husband is to work actively..towards his wife's sanctification", and C) "..the groom must actively seek the sanctification of his bride." I am a mere laymen, but is this not heretical? It is the Spirit's job to sanctify, not a spouse's. Is not sanctification the ongoing work of the Spirit of God within a Christian, causing them to be evermore Christlike? The lack of clarifying statements by Baucham on this topic is worrisome. 3) On page 30 Baucham completely abrogates the hard work and dedication to the kingdom of Pricilla! Even though she is out with Aquila preaching and training (Acts 18:26--the student is Apollos), Baucham draws a conclusion the Bible does not even imply, and asserts that women really shouldn't be doing that sort of thing. How astonishing of a statement he makes here. It really makes me boil. :) Thanks all! Don't forget to read your Bible and pray more than you read secondary lit!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Boling

    As a husband and a relatively new father of 13 year old adopted daughter, I am always on the lookout for helpful resources that direct the reader to solid biblical truth on how to lead a family by the grace of God. There are certainly many books on the market that provide 10 ways to accomplish this aspect or 5 ways to better do that; however, few tackle in a comprehensive yet accessible manner how husbands and fathers are to best fulfill their calling to shepherd their families as Scripture outl As a husband and a relatively new father of 13 year old adopted daughter, I am always on the lookout for helpful resources that direct the reader to solid biblical truth on how to lead a family by the grace of God. There are certainly many books on the market that provide 10 ways to accomplish this aspect or 5 ways to better do that; however, few tackle in a comprehensive yet accessible manner how husbands and fathers are to best fulfill their calling to shepherd their families as Scripture outlines. Voddie Baucham, in his book Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes provides a marvelously helpful guide on what it means to be a leader in the manner that God desires. Baucham divides this book into five sections each addressing a separate yet intimately related aspect of family shepherding. For those who may not be familiar with what the concept of a family shepherd looks like, Baucham rightly notes this duty if you will involves the need for fathers to “take the helm and begin to lead and disciple their wives and children. This taking of the family helm is rooted in God’s own role as our Heavenly Father. Baucham aptly comments that as men, “We’re the governors and guides of our families, and the way we lead has far-reaching implications.” In each of the sections of this book, Baucham remains firmly fixed on outlining the why, what, and how of what it means for fathers and husbands to lead. Part one deals with the necessity that exists for men to be equipped with the tools to lead with a focus given by Baucham throughout on the biblical view of the family. While many pay lip service to the reality that parents, in particular fathers have been given the god ordained role of raising and discipling their children, many leave that responsibility to church programs such as youth group or Sunday School. To demonstrate what the biblical model looks like, Baucham takes the reader on a journey through Scripture, noting along the way the methodology and importance given to family discipleship. After building that foundation, he then provides a three-pronged approach to implementing biblical discipleship in the home. Parenting is after all more than schoolwork or ensuring your children do not embarrass you with their behavior out in public. Baucham correctly reminds us that we are raising the next generation of believers and the focus should be on raising a godly generation of men and women who are godly and mature. In part two, Baucham explores family discipleship and evangelism within the home. We often think of evangelism as an external activity, something along the lines of going to where the heathen are and passing out some tracts in order to help people get “saved”, something far too often viewed as a singular event. Baucham avers “we must not make the mistake of reducing the gospel to introductory status. The gospel is all-encompassing.” Since the gospel produces faith, repentance, and obedience, proclaiming the gospel at all times in our homes is something the family shepherd must be about doing at all times. This is in accordance with the mandate provided in Deuteronomy 6. Baucham suggests a way to instill biblical knowledge in the home is through the lost practice of catechism. Those not familiar with that term or who might associate it as some sort of Catholic Church tradition are reminded by Baucham that at its core, “Catechism is simply a pedagogical method employing questions and answers to teach a set body of knowledge.” Essentially it involves sitting down with your family, reading Scripture and then discussing what you have read. Combined with family worship, something Baucham also encourages in this book, the reader will have a solid methodology by which to engage in sharing the gospel in their home. A strong and biblically rooted marriage is another vital element in the home and Baucham tackles that subject in part three. Husbands are commanded to love their wives as Christ loved the church, a tall and sometimes heady goal yet something we should all strive towards. In fact, Baucham states “leading a wife is the foundation upon which a man’s shepherding ministry in the home is built. Engaging this foundation, Baucham discusses the fact that marriage is for procreation, sanctification, and finally a picture of our own relationship as believers with Christ. Furthermore, he notes what it means to live in the covenant of marriage. I appreciated his comments on rooting a marriage properly in the covenant of marriage rather than in our children. Many friends of mine who are now empty nesters are having a hard time adjusting to their children leaving home. Their lives were so focused on their children that once their children departed, they have issues relating to one another. The family shepherd must train up a child in the way they should so when they are old they will not depart from that foundation. This necessarily involves training and discipline, two topics Baucham engages in part four. Anyone with children or who have ever been around children know that even the loveliest and well behaved child is a sinner. We live in a fallen world and family shepherds must help their children understand their need for the grace of God provided through the cross. Moreover, Baucham reminds the reader that “We’re not merely managing our children’s behavior; we’re actually instructing them in righteousness.” This will require jettisoning the popular approach of being your child’s buddy. Family shepherds must deal with sinful behavior, remind and teach them of what God expects and why, and call them to a place of repentance. Perhaps most important is the need for family shepherds to live and walk their talk and foremost to pray for your children. This restraining of sin will inevitably require corrective discipline. This tool is noted by Baucham as something that is not something that will bring about salvation but rather “it’s a tool God has given us, and he expects us to employ it in the monumental task of bringing up our children “in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.” The final section of this book provides a lifestyle evaluation for family shepherds, specifically the opportunity to assess our lives and to effect any needed changes. Baucham encourages husbands to be actively involved in a local church community. Church attendance is more than something to check off the weekly things to do list. It is a place where we can be edified, where we can connect with other family shepherds to encourage one another and to be encouraged. Baucham also addresses how family shepherds make use of their time. One thing I appreciated that Baucham addressed is the need for Sabbath rest, giving God a day He commands we give Him. The Sabbath often gets a bad name these days as some associate the Sabbath day with those who overreach on the works side of the issue. Baucham rightly reminds the reader that taking a day of rest involves what it was intended to be when God commanded Israel to observe this day, namely spending time with family and fellow believers in devoting a day to God and to serving Him, whether that is at home or at church. This serves to set the example for our children on the need to constantly focus on the things of God. Family Shepherds is a book I highly recommend for all husbands and fathers to read. Baucham provides a number of important concepts that are biblically rooted and practical and if implemented will go a long way to helping family shepherds fulfill their God given mandate to lead their families in the things of God. I received this book for free from Crossway Books for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mwansa

    I struggled with this book. One line that is found in chapter after chapter is something akin to 'without getting into details' or 'there is not enough time to cover everything' and it really shows. It is informative but leaves one with the feeling of an incomplete meal. The good is the book lays out the need for men to step up to the call that God has given them of family shepherds and gives general insight into what this means. It lays out principle, theory and practice based on the biblical f I struggled with this book. One line that is found in chapter after chapter is something akin to 'without getting into details' or 'there is not enough time to cover everything' and it really shows. It is informative but leaves one with the feeling of an incomplete meal. The good is the book lays out the need for men to step up to the call that God has given them of family shepherds and gives general insight into what this means. It lays out principle, theory and practice based on the biblical foundation as well as a couple of steps that can be applied with immediate effect. The bad is that the most gripping lines are the ones he quotes from other books, particularly the puritans but also others like Paul David Tripp. The ugly. There is no ugly. It is a good book. You should read it. If it leaves you wanting more, read your bible and the other books it recommends to find more

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Funke

    3.5/5. This is a good and very important book. Baucham’s main argument is strong and the book is fairly easy to read. For some who are unfamiliar with the topic this could be very significant and life-changing. However, the book would benefit from being trimmed down (some parts are rambly/scattered; it’s OK to assume some things), and Baucham does appeal to a lot of authorities (largely theologians in the Reformed tradition, which I’m happy with, of course, but the balance could be better). Ther 3.5/5. This is a good and very important book. Baucham’s main argument is strong and the book is fairly easy to read. For some who are unfamiliar with the topic this could be very significant and life-changing. However, the book would benefit from being trimmed down (some parts are rambly/scattered; it’s OK to assume some things), and Baucham does appeal to a lot of authorities (largely theologians in the Reformed tradition, which I’m happy with, of course, but the balance could be better). There’s also a weird flex about the two great commandments (to love God and neighbour), which seems strange given the important place they have in the sort of documents that Baucham recommends (Reformed confessions and catechisms).

  25. 4 out of 5

    Thaddeus

    This is a great, short introductory book outlining the role of men as family shepherds in their homes as husbands and fathers! Voddie clearly lays out the biblical mandate to men and outlines the beauty of God's design for men to walk in. It's easy to read and Voddie is an engaging writer with practical advice and illustrations. I read it together with my wife and I'd highly recommend it to any men, either single or married with or without kids, this book is a great resource to encourage and equ This is a great, short introductory book outlining the role of men as family shepherds in their homes as husbands and fathers! Voddie clearly lays out the biblical mandate to men and outlines the beauty of God's design for men to walk in. It's easy to read and Voddie is an engaging writer with practical advice and illustrations. I read it together with my wife and I'd highly recommend it to any men, either single or married with or without kids, this book is a great resource to encourage and equip men. Check it out!

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Rimmer

    Read and re-read with others. Great food for the husband and father. Enjoyed the emphasis placed on integrity versus compartmentalization. Simplified and integrated a lot of impulses that before seemed to be in conflict, showing how they should all flow out of the same center. Would recommend to anyone who wants to serve their family as Christ would have them do.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Convicting book about taking leadership from a father's perspective to the next level. Every Christian father/husband should read this book, and implement some of the many practical suggestions he makes about taking a stronger role in leading our families like Christ leads the church. Loved every minute of it. Convicting book about taking leadership from a father's perspective to the next level. Every Christian father/husband should read this book, and implement some of the many practical suggestions he makes about taking a stronger role in leading our families like Christ leads the church. Loved every minute of it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    There's a lot of good to be gleaned here. There were chapters marked by unconvincing assertions, and chapters that seemed far too thin of an attempt to deal with issues. "Shortcomings" noted, men would do better to read this book and shepherd their families than critique less than perfect encouragements do as much. There's a lot of good to be gleaned here. There were chapters marked by unconvincing assertions, and chapters that seemed far too thin of an attempt to deal with issues. "Shortcomings" noted, men would do better to read this book and shepherd their families than critique less than perfect encouragements do as much.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Baucham provides great insight into leading your family in all aspects of life. I like how he cares most about the truth and providing the most value to the reader regardless of what society wants to hear. It's important to continue to learn throughout life so that you can impart the knowledge and understanding and wisdom to your children as they grow and continue asking questions. Baucham provides great insight into leading your family in all aspects of life. I like how he cares most about the truth and providing the most value to the reader regardless of what society wants to hear. It's important to continue to learn throughout life so that you can impart the knowledge and understanding and wisdom to your children as they grow and continue asking questions.

  30. 5 out of 5

    James Lynch

    Phenomenal. Biblical. Excellent incorporation of church history. Fearless. Pastoral. Highly recommend to all Christians, especially husbands and fathers. One of the best books on the family I have ever encountered.

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