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Democratic Education: Revised Edition

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A groundbreaking classic that lays out and defends a democratic theory of education Who should have the authority to shape the education of citizens in a democracy? This is the central question posed by Amy Gutmann in the first book-length study of the democratic theory of education. The author tackles a wide range of issues, from the democratic case against book banning to A groundbreaking classic that lays out and defends a democratic theory of education Who should have the authority to shape the education of citizens in a democracy? This is the central question posed by Amy Gutmann in the first book-length study of the democratic theory of education. The author tackles a wide range of issues, from the democratic case against book banning to the role of teachers' unions in education, as well as the vexed questions of public support for private schools and affirmative action in college admissions.


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A groundbreaking classic that lays out and defends a democratic theory of education Who should have the authority to shape the education of citizens in a democracy? This is the central question posed by Amy Gutmann in the first book-length study of the democratic theory of education. The author tackles a wide range of issues, from the democratic case against book banning to A groundbreaking classic that lays out and defends a democratic theory of education Who should have the authority to shape the education of citizens in a democracy? This is the central question posed by Amy Gutmann in the first book-length study of the democratic theory of education. The author tackles a wide range of issues, from the democratic case against book banning to the role of teachers' unions in education, as well as the vexed questions of public support for private schools and affirmative action in college admissions.

30 review for Democratic Education: Revised Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    I am glad I have read this book for now the pain is over!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Summer Kartchner Olsen

    I think this book gets some bad reviews because it is difficult to read. You don't have to agree with Gutmann or like her writing style to see that she is a great thinker. IMO, not every topic can be exciting, fun, etc. It is what it is. I think this book gets some bad reviews because it is difficult to read. You don't have to agree with Gutmann or like her writing style to see that she is a great thinker. IMO, not every topic can be exciting, fun, etc. It is what it is.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elke

    i've only read the intro and parts of chapter one so far but this is painful for me to read. every paragraph or point she is making is three times longer than it needs to be. urgh! EDIT: okay. after finishing the first two chapters, i will add another star to it's writing. she's making a good point about what education should REALLY look like in a democracy. however, she could still work on sentence length. just spit it out guttman! i will resist rating it until i am finished with the whole book. i've only read the intro and parts of chapter one so far but this is painful for me to read. every paragraph or point she is making is three times longer than it needs to be. urgh! EDIT: okay. after finishing the first two chapters, i will add another star to it's writing. she's making a good point about what education should REALLY look like in a democracy. however, she could still work on sentence length. just spit it out guttman! i will resist rating it until i am finished with the whole book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gloria

    A major book on the philosophy of public education. Reframes goals around the formation of citizen of a democracy rather than an economic player/producer. This new edition includes new prologue and epilogue by the author. Definitely not an easy read (written with an academic's worldview) but still I think it is clear enough in structure and careful in defining terms that it is an extremely valuable thing to read if at all confused, angry, or concerned about public education. A major book on the philosophy of public education. Reframes goals around the formation of citizen of a democracy rather than an economic player/producer. This new edition includes new prologue and epilogue by the author. Definitely not an easy read (written with an academic's worldview) but still I think it is clear enough in structure and careful in defining terms that it is an extremely valuable thing to read if at all confused, angry, or concerned about public education.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    First time I've been told that the goal of public school eduction is "to equip citizens to participate meaningfully in the democratic process." (democratic threshold) Government, therefore, supersedes parents' right to educate their children--that's the old-fashioned patriarchal concept of a single authority figure whose power is based in the Bible and "divine right of kings" heirarchy. The goal of everyone is to live the "good life." First time I've been told that the goal of public school eduction is "to equip citizens to participate meaningfully in the democratic process." (democratic threshold) Government, therefore, supersedes parents' right to educate their children--that's the old-fashioned patriarchal concept of a single authority figure whose power is based in the Bible and "divine right of kings" heirarchy. The goal of everyone is to live the "good life."

  6. 5 out of 5

    E

    For a 25-year-old book, the basics are still relevant, but the advent of massive nonresidential universities, voucher schemes for private K12 schooling, high-stakes standardized testing, and the neoliberal education reform movement make several of her points even more salient and debatable.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Micheal Hoffman

    The liberal values are so hard to find in this book that Amy Gutmann almost appears as a quasi-communitarian. Essentially, the democratic body decides what education should be even if this undermines values such as truth.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adam Gutschenritter

    My brain hurts. Gutman lays a lot of foundational ideas of what education should be set up like in a democratic society, while also exposing a variety of problems that pop up as different group vie for control.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sara Swanson

    Had to read it for school. Did NOT enjoy at all.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A seminal book in the philosophy of education that presents a compelling alternative to equality as the educational standard.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Read it a few summers ago for a class at BSU. I like the theory: that the purpose of education is NOT to create workers, but democratic participoants. Verbose, but worth the time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Guisela

    ?????? I did not enjoy this book

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Welborn

  15. 5 out of 5

    Davenportscouch

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Lovejoy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Abir Botes

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Hernández

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katherin

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tim Barczak

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jay

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alex Kardon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Chou

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  29. 5 out of 5

    Helette

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dave J

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