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Das große Mittelerde Lexikon: Ein alphabetischer Führer zur Fantasy-Welt von J.R.R. Tolkien

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Das Standardwerk zur Welt des Herrn der Ringe, des Hobbit und des Silmarillion. Mit genauen Worterklärungen aller Namen und Bezeichnungen. Sachkundig bearbeitet und auf den neuesten Stand gebracht von einem führenden Tolkien-Experten Deutschlands, unter Verwendung von Tolkiens bislang nicht auf Deutsch erschienen Manuskripten und Studien zu Mittelerde. Mit ausführlichen Text Das Standardwerk zur Welt des Herrn der Ringe, des Hobbit und des Silmarillion. Mit genauen Worterklärungen aller Namen und Bezeichnungen. Sachkundig bearbeitet und auf den neuesten Stand gebracht von einem führenden Tolkien-Experten Deutschlands, unter Verwendung von Tolkiens bislang nicht auf Deutsch erschienen Manuskripten und Studien zu Mittelerde. Mit ausführlichen Textverweisen auf die deutschen Ausgaben von Tolkiens Werken.


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Das Standardwerk zur Welt des Herrn der Ringe, des Hobbit und des Silmarillion. Mit genauen Worterklärungen aller Namen und Bezeichnungen. Sachkundig bearbeitet und auf den neuesten Stand gebracht von einem führenden Tolkien-Experten Deutschlands, unter Verwendung von Tolkiens bislang nicht auf Deutsch erschienen Manuskripten und Studien zu Mittelerde. Mit ausführlichen Text Das Standardwerk zur Welt des Herrn der Ringe, des Hobbit und des Silmarillion. Mit genauen Worterklärungen aller Namen und Bezeichnungen. Sachkundig bearbeitet und auf den neuesten Stand gebracht von einem führenden Tolkien-Experten Deutschlands, unter Verwendung von Tolkiens bislang nicht auf Deutsch erschienen Manuskripten und Studien zu Mittelerde. Mit ausführlichen Textverweisen auf die deutschen Ausgaben von Tolkiens Werken.

30 review for Das große Mittelerde Lexikon: Ein alphabetischer Führer zur Fantasy-Welt von J.R.R. Tolkien

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    An oh-so very helpful reference book for those who want to become a Middle Earth historian or perhaps an etymologist focusing on the Undying Lands......maybe a specialist in Numenor studies? Robert Foster's The Complete Guide to Middle Earth: From The Hobbit to the Silmarillion will give you just that, a comprehensive compilation of the people, places, events, etc as created by J.R.R. Tolkien. This is very helpful for the reader who can't retain every single detail Tolkien packed into his books. An oh-so very helpful reference book for those who want to become a Middle Earth historian or perhaps an etymologist focusing on the Undying Lands......maybe a specialist in Numenor studies? Robert Foster's The Complete Guide to Middle Earth: From The Hobbit to the Silmarillion will give you just that, a comprehensive compilation of the people, places, events, etc as created by J.R.R. Tolkien. This is very helpful for the reader who can't retain every single detail Tolkien packed into his books. I think there's only a few people on Earth who can, a small tribe of large-brained semi-humans inhabiting Oxford. Though encyclopedic in nature, The Complete Guide reads more like a dictionary (which means you don't actually read it) with its alphabetical listing and relatively short entries. Short though they may be, generally they don't omit information. After all, in many cases there wasn't a lot of information to go on, so why skip any of it? Example: PERIANNATH (S: 'halflings') Hobbits (q.v.). (III 510; R 67) On the other hand, Tolkien being the incredible world-builder that he was, relatively speaking there is copious amounts of info on fairly unimportant characters: MIRABELLA BRANDYBUCK (TA 2860-2960) Hobbit of the Shire, youngest daughter of Gerontius Took. She married Gorbadoc Brandybuck and had seven children by him. (III 475, 476) Mirabella doesn't even appear in The Lord of the Rings! She's only a bleedin' footnote! Ah, but I love it. Sometimes these entries of bit players provide enough detail to allow one to imagine up a mini story in their mind. Generally, the entries are fuller and quite helpful, at least wherever they can be, and seldom do they exhaust a word when they shouldn't. For instance, a page or two on Frodo is good, but his whole story replete with every detail would take up books' worth of pages...three books to be precise. Occasionally entries will send you on an endless quest for the answer. For instance, "Ngoldo" essentially tells you to see "Noldo," which points you to "Tengwa," and "Tengwa" isn't in the book! However, there is something called "Tengwar," which apparently is a writing system. So in the end you'll get there, and this little annoyance isn't the book's fault. Blame it on the boss of nova, Tolkien, that generative blast that had a great hand in creating today's fantasy world as we know it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brian Greenlee

    I know it might seem strange but my wife and I used this as a "baby name book". all three of our kids can be found in this book. My original copy is falling apart at the seams, but I won't be getting rid of it any time soon. I know it might seem strange but my wife and I used this as a "baby name book". all three of our kids can be found in this book. My original copy is falling apart at the seams, but I won't be getting rid of it any time soon.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Very nice reference book for Tolkien's work. Great pics and write ups for just about everything you might want to know. Very recommended Very nice reference book for Tolkien's work. Great pics and write ups for just about everything you might want to know. Very recommended

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Lynds

    I keep this around any time I am reading something set in Middle Earth, which is much of the time. My dog-eared paperback copy is filled with notes, scribbled maps and bookmarks. Even avid readers of Tolkien's work sometimes have a hard time keeping track of the names, dates and places. Included are short descriptions of all the who's, the what's, the where's and the when's. This guide is a perfect reading companion. I keep this around any time I am reading something set in Middle Earth, which is much of the time. My dog-eared paperback copy is filled with notes, scribbled maps and bookmarks. Even avid readers of Tolkien's work sometimes have a hard time keeping track of the names, dates and places. Included are short descriptions of all the who's, the what's, the where's and the when's. This guide is a perfect reading companion.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Linda ~ they got the mustard out! ~

    This is not a book you read, but is instead an invaluable resource for Middle-earth fans. This is a comprehensive guide to all things Middle-earth, by someone who actually knows the world and history of it. Sadly, that can't be said for everyone trying to cash in on the Tolkien name these days, so this older resource is definitely the go-to for anyone wanting a quick, easy guide to basic info on names, words, places, events, people and beasts, and tells you where in the texts the information is This is not a book you read, but is instead an invaluable resource for Middle-earth fans. This is a comprehensive guide to all things Middle-earth, by someone who actually knows the world and history of it. Sadly, that can't be said for everyone trying to cash in on the Tolkien name these days, so this older resource is definitely the go-to for anyone wanting a quick, easy guide to basic info on names, words, places, events, people and beasts, and tells you where in the texts the information is from.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kacey

    I absolutely adore this book. It's fantastic to have around whenever anyone happens to ask me something about Lord of the Rings that I don't actually know. I love having it on hand as reference material. Speaking as someone who has had great difficulty when trying to read The Silmarillion, it really helps explain how events which took place outside of The Lord of the Rings came to pass. I've checked this book out of my local library so many times, and I was thrilled when I finally got my own pers I absolutely adore this book. It's fantastic to have around whenever anyone happens to ask me something about Lord of the Rings that I don't actually know. I love having it on hand as reference material. Speaking as someone who has had great difficulty when trying to read The Silmarillion, it really helps explain how events which took place outside of The Lord of the Rings came to pass. I've checked this book out of my local library so many times, and I was thrilled when I finally got my own personal copy. The pictures interspersed among the entries are gorgeous and always worth some attention. Love this book and would recommend to any fan of Lord of the Rings. Anyone who is not so big on Middle Earth and the lore around it probably wouldn't enjoy this book quite so much.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    Of course this isn’t the kind of book you read cover to cover, but was it a great guide or companion to have by your side while reading Tolkien, absolutely!! Well done, very basic alphabetical order so easy to consult and search in it. Look to me like it’s very complete. If you want to deep-dive into Tolkien universe and want a useful reference book to help you go into it, I would recommend this one!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    This, to me, is the definitive companion or reference guide to Tolkien's books, in addition to any indexes or appendices found at the back of the actual books themselves. You get an A-Z encyclopedic concordance from pretty much anything in The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, the Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. The artwork, while not needed, is fantastic work by Ted Nasmith. [also: it matches the illustrated hardbacks of The Hobbit by Alan Lee, The Lord of the Rings by Alan Lee, and The Silmari This, to me, is the definitive companion or reference guide to Tolkien's books, in addition to any indexes or appendices found at the back of the actual books themselves. You get an A-Z encyclopedic concordance from pretty much anything in The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, the Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales. The artwork, while not needed, is fantastic work by Ted Nasmith. [also: it matches the illustrated hardbacks of The Hobbit by Alan Lee, The Lord of the Rings by Alan Lee, and The Silmarillon by Ted Nasmith; (illustrations, size dimensions, the glossy paper...) all published by Harper Collins; quite well. Of course it is attractive in its own right, but saying it 'fits' really well with some other exisitng editions of Tolkien's books. Despite me writing a review, I did not 'read' all of this title, as it reference. Nevertheless, after randomly flipping through it (and looking up a few things here and there) I discovered that this book is incredibly handy and comprehensive. I agree with Christopher Tolkien's statement on the inside dustjacket flap: ""Mr Robert Foster's Complete Guide to Middle-earth supplies, as I have found through frequent use, an admirable work of reference." Aside from the various Tolkien books I recommend, I insist that this be the only 'extra' or 'reference' one needs to complement The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, The Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ettore Pasquini

    The structure is that of a dictionary, with entries for every single name, name variation, place, character, deity, war, sword, etc. There was never a time where I searched for something and I didn't find it here. It was useful while reading the Silmarillion and made it a whole lot more fun. I won't read Tolkien stuff without it. There are also full genealogy trees for all the main dynasties: Elrond / Elros, Isildur / Aragorn, Hurin / Boromir / Faramir, et al. Very handy to understand who’s who. The structure is that of a dictionary, with entries for every single name, name variation, place, character, deity, war, sword, etc. There was never a time where I searched for something and I didn't find it here. It was useful while reading the Silmarillion and made it a whole lot more fun. I won't read Tolkien stuff without it. There are also full genealogy trees for all the main dynasties: Elrond / Elros, Isildur / Aragorn, Hurin / Boromir / Faramir, et al. Very handy to understand who’s who. The only reason for not getting this book is that there's an illustrated guide, which might be nicer; however it's also bigger and less practical, and I wonder if it is as complete as this book, considering it’s half as many pages.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Athelstan

    This book is an exhaustive guide to everything in Tolkein's Lord of the Rings realm. I have found it indispensable over the years. I will remember something from the books and will consult this guide to be sure my recollection is correct. If you are new to the LOTR world, you will find this book to be very handy. There are spoilers throughout, obviously. I applaud Robert Foster's effort in compiling this information in one nifty volume. This book is an exhaustive guide to everything in Tolkein's Lord of the Rings realm. I have found it indispensable over the years. I will remember something from the books and will consult this guide to be sure my recollection is correct. If you are new to the LOTR world, you will find this book to be very handy. There are spoilers throughout, obviously. I applaud Robert Foster's effort in compiling this information in one nifty volume.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I used this as a reference book while reading the Silmarillion and found it, along with Karen Wyn Fonstad’s “The Atlas of Middle Earth”, to be an invaluable guide. At first I was using the index at the back of the Silmarillion to remind me of names/places (and all the variations thereof because Tolkien had to name everything in at least 2-3 different languages) but the further you get into the book, the harder it becomes to jog your memory of what came before (especially since a lot of the Noldo I used this as a reference book while reading the Silmarillion and found it, along with Karen Wyn Fonstad’s “The Atlas of Middle Earth”, to be an invaluable guide. At first I was using the index at the back of the Silmarillion to remind me of names/places (and all the variations thereof because Tolkien had to name everything in at least 2-3 different languages) but the further you get into the book, the harder it becomes to jog your memory of what came before (especially since a lot of the Noldor elves in middle earth have names that sound super similar and I can never keep straight without the genealogy tables in front of me). The Silmarillion only has very basic definitions in its index so when you are on page 200 of the Silmarillion and it refers back to some prophecy earlier in the book (where 10 pages in that book can span 500 years or more) you have to remember who said it and then look up all the mentions for that person in the index to try and find what page 200 is referring back to. In contrast, Robert Foster’s book has longer summaries so you can just read it all in there pretty easily and continue on with the bigger story. Also much easier to pick up if you just want to look up any random word/place/person within the tolkienverse.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael Reilly

    Impressive in both the depth of its content and its overall presentation, Robert Foster’s ‘definitive companion’ is a fine reference to the names, places and events of Tolkien’s world and published works. As an encyclopedia, it is as exhaustive as I would wish, however, its appeal and value is greatly enhanced by the inclusion of Ted Nasmith’s detailed art. The majority of his paintings are quite magnificent, with exceptional detail, realism and mood, capturing key landscapes and locations in co Impressive in both the depth of its content and its overall presentation, Robert Foster’s ‘definitive companion’ is a fine reference to the names, places and events of Tolkien’s world and published works. As an encyclopedia, it is as exhaustive as I would wish, however, its appeal and value is greatly enhanced by the inclusion of Ted Nasmith’s detailed art. The majority of his paintings are quite magnificent, with exceptional detail, realism and mood, capturing key landscapes and locations in compositions that held my attention for some time. Dramatic and often spectacular, these illustrations give life to the many descriptions, supporting the factual information with artistic vision. The book is well worth the price just for the art.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Stars: 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟/5 A great reference book for anyone interested in Tolkien. This little volume (I say of a 569 page book) claims to list and define almost everything that good ol' JRR mentioned in his books. At least, as of when it was originally published in 1971. It's a wonderful little oddity I picked up at the local record shop for about fifty cents and now it's going to sit in pride of place next to my copies of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. Stars: 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟/5 A great reference book for anyone interested in Tolkien. This little volume (I say of a 569 page book) claims to list and define almost everything that good ol' JRR mentioned in his books. At least, as of when it was originally published in 1971. It's a wonderful little oddity I picked up at the local record shop for about fifty cents and now it's going to sit in pride of place next to my copies of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff F

    Only the True Believers own this book. Welcome.

  15. 4 out of 5

    George Noland II

    An encyclopedia of persons, places and things in Tolkien’s Middle-earth. Excellent resource.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Scifimoth

    The essential companion to any re-reading of LOTR.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Was hoping for more details

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jared T

    Great reference if you need to check about places, things, etc.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Encyclopedic reference of Middle-Earth with alphabetized entries - first of a kind. Used many times. Started as labor of love. I can see how.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Isaiah Jung

    well organized

  21. 4 out of 5

    Figment

    A good quick reference for all those names and places that are found in Tolkien's works. I found it very useful when reading the Silmarillion. A good quick reference for all those names and places that are found in Tolkien's works. I found it very useful when reading the Silmarillion.

  22. 5 out of 5

    R

    I like reading reference books for Tolkien's works, especially when they come in an encyclopedia-esque form. It's pretty easy to tell, but I'm fascinated by his work and the legacy Tolkien himself left behind. Thus, I like to skim through and find little passages within these reference books; they're not all the same, and so it's interesting to see how similar or different the interpretations may be from book to book. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit are better known as his most famous I like reading reference books for Tolkien's works, especially when they come in an encyclopedia-esque form. It's pretty easy to tell, but I'm fascinated by his work and the legacy Tolkien himself left behind. Thus, I like to skim through and find little passages within these reference books; they're not all the same, and so it's interesting to see how similar or different the interpretations may be from book to book. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit are better known as his most famous works. However, his son Christopher Tolkien also compiled a bunch of his father's notes into what is known as the Silmarillion, the Unfinished Tales, and even the 12 volumes of The History of Middle-earth. Each story is rich in imagination and it is very difficult to keep track of one place and one character. Many characters may have similar names or even the same name, and some even go through transformations in which their previous name is no longer used, but a new one is adapted. This complexity is lessened however, with the help of reference books. The guidebooks (like this one) help to simplify and aid the reader in the midst of being muddled. Therefore, I find it so so so important for Tolkien admirers to have at least one type of reference for Tolkien (unless of course, you can remember everything) but also just for enjoyment. This book itself was helpful in reminding me the events and the time they took place, as well as the many Maiar and Elves named that for the life of me, I can't imagine trying to say aloud.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joe Scrubbins

    Loved this book since 1978 and always refer to it when rereading LOTR. Had the paperback since I was a kid and it’s really held up well over the years, despite some serious yellowing now and a creaky spine. Superb reference book. Entries give you enough information to understand every subject without throwing the kitchen sink at you...as could easily happen with a topic loaded with as much depth as Tolkien’s mythologies. Some entries are perhaps a little too short, although there is usually enoug Loved this book since 1978 and always refer to it when rereading LOTR. Had the paperback since I was a kid and it’s really held up well over the years, despite some serious yellowing now and a creaky spine. Superb reference book. Entries give you enough information to understand every subject without throwing the kitchen sink at you...as could easily happen with a topic loaded with as much depth as Tolkien’s mythologies. Some entries are perhaps a little too short, although there is usually enough there to at least point you in the right direction in another book or online. Back in the 70s and 80s, I found this made the book feel a little too limited. Today, though, with instant access to what’s on the net, this brevity makes the book an ideal primer. I also adore the old cover art, with a very traditional 60s-70s take on the Fellowship of the Ring. The men have a decidedly Renaissance appearance, though, that is oddly charming if maybe more appropriate to a Dutch Masters cigar box.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This is certainly an indispensable companion when reading The Lord of the Rings. It is an alphabetically arranged reference guide to pretty much all of the characters, place names, and general subjects in Tolkien's Middle-Earth based books. It even has page number cross references to some of the more popular editions of the books. I reread The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit every year or two, and I find that I always get more enjoyment out of reading the books if I have this guide close by whi This is certainly an indispensable companion when reading The Lord of the Rings. It is an alphabetically arranged reference guide to pretty much all of the characters, place names, and general subjects in Tolkien's Middle-Earth based books. It even has page number cross references to some of the more popular editions of the books. I reread The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit every year or two, and I find that I always get more enjoyment out of reading the books if I have this guide close by while I read. If you're thinking of reading The Lord of the Rings for the first time, or even re-reading it, this is definitely a companion you'll want on your journey.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Charity U

    It truly is set up as a dictionary! You can look up any word from LOTR, Hobbit, or Silmarillion, and it’s almost certain to be in here! I haven’t found any yet that aren’t, so. Names, locations, battles, objects, all categorized alphabetically. Page numbers for each item are also included, but even though my books are DelRey, same as this guide, the numbers don’t work – my books came out rather later, so. I have found it to be quite helpful, thought I still love the Atlas more – it would take an It truly is set up as a dictionary! You can look up any word from LOTR, Hobbit, or Silmarillion, and it’s almost certain to be in here! I haven’t found any yet that aren’t, so. Names, locations, battles, objects, all categorized alphabetically. Page numbers for each item are also included, but even though my books are DelRey, same as this guide, the numbers don’t work – my books came out rather later, so. I have found it to be quite helpful, thought I still love the Atlas more – it would take an unbelievable amount to beat that. J If you can get a copy, and you love LOTR, I recommend it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    While not a complete resource (some minor entries which could have been are overlooked, and in a couple of entries mild conjecture is made- but when it is made a notice is given by Robert Foster that they are conjectures), it remains an excellent resource for Tolkien Fans. Having used all of Tolkien's works and private letters, Robert Foster does an excellent job of creating this encyclopedia of answers for those who have yet to read his private notes/letters or other works. While not a complete resource (some minor entries which could have been are overlooked, and in a couple of entries mild conjecture is made- but when it is made a notice is given by Robert Foster that they are conjectures), it remains an excellent resource for Tolkien Fans. Having used all of Tolkien's works and private letters, Robert Foster does an excellent job of creating this encyclopedia of answers for those who have yet to read his private notes/letters or other works.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Diana (Bever) Barber

    This is a reference guide. It isn't really a cover-to-cover read, though, I suppose you could do it. I really enjoyed the thoroughness of this book. Mr. Foster covers his bases through the Hobbit to the Silmarilion (sp?) and beyond. I couldn't think of anything that was missing, and I learned a little about some people, places, and things that I was shocked I didn't already know. This is a handy guide to have when reading Tolkien's works. This is a reference guide. It isn't really a cover-to-cover read, though, I suppose you could do it. I really enjoyed the thoroughness of this book. Mr. Foster covers his bases through the Hobbit to the Silmarilion (sp?) and beyond. I couldn't think of anything that was missing, and I learned a little about some people, places, and things that I was shocked I didn't already know. This is a handy guide to have when reading Tolkien's works.

  28. 5 out of 5

    HBalikov

    From the First Era of Tolkien Rediscovery. Very comprehensive discussions of people, places and things. A bonus are the genealogical tables and Chronology of the First Age. Maps provide little detail beyond what Tolkien drew. No speculation is both a virtue (straight Tolkien) and a loss (no attempt to draw on secondary sources). Highly useful whether reading the original works or reviewing Peter Jackson's efforts From the First Era of Tolkien Rediscovery. Very comprehensive discussions of people, places and things. A bonus are the genealogical tables and Chronology of the First Age. Maps provide little detail beyond what Tolkien drew. No speculation is both a virtue (straight Tolkien) and a loss (no attempt to draw on secondary sources). Highly useful whether reading the original works or reviewing Peter Jackson's efforts

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (Luminous Libro)

    I really enjoyed reading this glossary bit by bit. It's great to have something like this to pick up when I only have a minute or two to read. I think by now I have memorized nearly all the names of the Valar, and I can even tell the difference between most of the sons of Feanor! It's great to see all those little historical facts of Middle Earth laid out and explained. It's incredible how Tolkien kept it all so organized in his writings! I really enjoyed reading this glossary bit by bit. It's great to have something like this to pick up when I only have a minute or two to read. I think by now I have memorized nearly all the names of the Valar, and I can even tell the difference between most of the sons of Feanor! It's great to see all those little historical facts of Middle Earth laid out and explained. It's incredible how Tolkien kept it all so organized in his writings!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Inara

    Title in German: Das große Mittelerde Lexikon A "must have" for everybody who loves Middleearth. In alphabetical order are listed every person, scene, term and background to Tolkien´s world. In the appendix can be found a chronology of the early period of Arda and the family trees of the most important elves and kings. This review refers to the german edition revised by Helmut W. Pesch. Title in German: Das große Mittelerde Lexikon A "must have" for everybody who loves Middleearth. In alphabetical order are listed every person, scene, term and background to Tolkien´s world. In the appendix can be found a chronology of the early period of Arda and the family trees of the most important elves and kings. This review refers to the german edition revised by Helmut W. Pesch.

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