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Grant Morrison: Combining the Worlds of Contemporary Comics

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One of the most eclectic and distinctive writers currently working in comics, Grant Morrison (b. 1960) brings the auteurist sensibility of alternative comics and graphic novels to the popular genres-superhero, science fiction, and fantasy-that dominate the American and British comics industries. His comics range from bestsellers featuring the most universally recognized su One of the most eclectic and distinctive writers currently working in comics, Grant Morrison (b. 1960) brings the auteurist sensibility of alternative comics and graphic novels to the popular genres-superhero, science fiction, and fantasy-that dominate the American and British comics industries. His comics range from bestsellers featuring the most universally recognized superhero franchises (All-Star Superman, New X-Men, Batman) to more independent, creator-owned work (The Invisibles, The Filth, We3) that defies any generic classification. In Grant Morrison: Combining the Worlds of Contemporary Comics, author Marc Singer examines how Morrison uses this fusion of styles to intervene in the major political, aesthetic, and intellectual challenges of our time. His comics blur the boundaries between fantasy and realism, mixing autobiographical representation and cultural critique with heroic adventure. They offer self-reflexive appraisals of their own genres while they experiment with the formal elements of comics. Perhaps most ambitiously, they challenge contemporary theories of language and meaning, seeking to develop new modes of expression grounded in comics' capacity for visual narrative and the fantasy genres' ability to make figurative meanings literal.


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One of the most eclectic and distinctive writers currently working in comics, Grant Morrison (b. 1960) brings the auteurist sensibility of alternative comics and graphic novels to the popular genres-superhero, science fiction, and fantasy-that dominate the American and British comics industries. His comics range from bestsellers featuring the most universally recognized su One of the most eclectic and distinctive writers currently working in comics, Grant Morrison (b. 1960) brings the auteurist sensibility of alternative comics and graphic novels to the popular genres-superhero, science fiction, and fantasy-that dominate the American and British comics industries. His comics range from bestsellers featuring the most universally recognized superhero franchises (All-Star Superman, New X-Men, Batman) to more independent, creator-owned work (The Invisibles, The Filth, We3) that defies any generic classification. In Grant Morrison: Combining the Worlds of Contemporary Comics, author Marc Singer examines how Morrison uses this fusion of styles to intervene in the major political, aesthetic, and intellectual challenges of our time. His comics blur the boundaries between fantasy and realism, mixing autobiographical representation and cultural critique with heroic adventure. They offer self-reflexive appraisals of their own genres while they experiment with the formal elements of comics. Perhaps most ambitiously, they challenge contemporary theories of language and meaning, seeking to develop new modes of expression grounded in comics' capacity for visual narrative and the fantasy genres' ability to make figurative meanings literal.

30 review for Grant Morrison: Combining the Worlds of Contemporary Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    One of the best critical studies of an entire corpus that I've read. Singer fairly addresses Morrison's work, evaluating his flaws and failures along with his successes, without trying to force Morrison's corpus into a particular, singular reading. One of the best critical studies of an entire corpus that I've read. Singer fairly addresses Morrison's work, evaluating his flaws and failures along with his successes, without trying to force Morrison's corpus into a particular, singular reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    An excellent academic overview of a fantastic comic book career, highlighting the relationships to Morrison's world view, personal life and the tropes and trends that permeate his work. (Although I could happily never read the words 'hypostasis' and 'synecdochic' ever again!) An excellent academic overview of a fantastic comic book career, highlighting the relationships to Morrison's world view, personal life and the tropes and trends that permeate his work. (Although I could happily never read the words 'hypostasis' and 'synecdochic' ever again!)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex E

    Marc Singer's interpretation and review of Grant Morrison's work from his early days to the mid 2000's was a well written and thought provoking study on not only a writer's evolution, but also on the metamorphosis of ideas that Morrison often writes about. This book goes project by project of Morrison's career up to the ending of Seaguy. So we really get an in depth analysis on not only the work and what it means on the surface, but also the subtext of each series. It explores themes, plots, allu Marc Singer's interpretation and review of Grant Morrison's work from his early days to the mid 2000's was a well written and thought provoking study on not only a writer's evolution, but also on the metamorphosis of ideas that Morrison often writes about. This book goes project by project of Morrison's career up to the ending of Seaguy. So we really get an in depth analysis on not only the work and what it means on the surface, but also the subtext of each series. It explores themes, plots, allusions, theories, and much more. The chronological order of how each segment/chapter is arranged is really helpful as well, as Singer makes ties and links to things that are influenced or in direct relation/opposition to some earlier work, some early theme. If I had to point out some things I disliked, its that it seems Singer has more of an appeal to certain works of Morrison. Where he will have pages and pages of one book, and a quick chapter on another. I would've like to have seen the type of analysis on all of his works, as sometimes I found myself wanting more. But I guess wanting more isn't so much of a bad thing. If you like the works of Grant Morrison, you can't go wrong with this one. Recommended for people who like to read academic studies on comic book stories and histories.

  4. 5 out of 5

    acidbdx

  5. 5 out of 5

    James Campbell

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chad Brock

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Foxworth

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Burley

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sean

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rand

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ido

  13. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simeon Berry

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lou Noble

  16. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Alves

  17. 4 out of 5

    S_p_r

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Kunka

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bob Cat

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jeaniecance

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dan Nash

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul Blackwell

  24. 5 out of 5

    William Bradley

  25. 4 out of 5

    Frank

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Will

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mark Rogers

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mattias Indy

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