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Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors?: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell

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In the 1830s, when a brave and curious girl named Elizabeth Blackwell was growing up, women were supposed to be wives and mothers. Some women could be teachers or seamstresses, but career options were few. Certainly no women were doctors. But Elizabeth refused to accept the common beliefs that women weren’t smart enough to be doctors, or that they were too weak for such ha In the 1830s, when a brave and curious girl named Elizabeth Blackwell was growing up, women were supposed to be wives and mothers. Some women could be teachers or seamstresses, but career options were few. Certainly no women were doctors. But Elizabeth refused to accept the common beliefs that women weren’t smart enough to be doctors, or that they were too weak for such hard work. And she would not take no for an answer. Although she faced much opposition, she worked hard and finally—when she graduated from medical school and went on to have a brilliant career—proved her detractors wrong. This inspiring story of the first female doctor shows how one strong-willed woman opened the doors for all the female doctors to come.


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In the 1830s, when a brave and curious girl named Elizabeth Blackwell was growing up, women were supposed to be wives and mothers. Some women could be teachers or seamstresses, but career options were few. Certainly no women were doctors. But Elizabeth refused to accept the common beliefs that women weren’t smart enough to be doctors, or that they were too weak for such ha In the 1830s, when a brave and curious girl named Elizabeth Blackwell was growing up, women were supposed to be wives and mothers. Some women could be teachers or seamstresses, but career options were few. Certainly no women were doctors. But Elizabeth refused to accept the common beliefs that women weren’t smart enough to be doctors, or that they were too weak for such hard work. And she would not take no for an answer. Although she faced much opposition, she worked hard and finally—when she graduated from medical school and went on to have a brilliant career—proved her detractors wrong. This inspiring story of the first female doctor shows how one strong-willed woman opened the doors for all the female doctors to come.

30 review for Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors?: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul Hankins

    Tanya Lee Stone returns to the picture book format to bring us the story of Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman doctor in America. The title alone presents a subtle kind of challenge like the one Elizabeth Blackwell received from Mary Donaldson. Tanya presents Elizabeth as an "every girl" kind of character, the kind of girl who might not have even envisioned herself in such a role. But the suggestion of a respected friend stuck with Elizabeth, a suggestion that became a kind of gnawing that saw Tanya Lee Stone returns to the picture book format to bring us the story of Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman doctor in America. The title alone presents a subtle kind of challenge like the one Elizabeth Blackwell received from Mary Donaldson. Tanya presents Elizabeth as an "every girl" kind of character, the kind of girl who might not have even envisioned herself in such a role. But the suggestion of a respected friend stuck with Elizabeth, a suggestion that became a kind of gnawing that saw Elizabeth through to medical school. Marjorie Priceman (ZIN ZIN A VIOLIN) illustrates the text reminding me of another of my favorite illustrators, Chris Raschka. Tanya's author notes present a closer look into Blackwell's life after medical school which should prompt younger readers to think about how far we have come as a culture. Further, younger readers might be invited (read challenged) to consider "Who Says __________ Can't Be ___________?" As with ELIZABETH LEADS THE WAY, Stone presents a historical figure in a most accessible manner and for this presentation, I am giving the new work the ONE BOOK/FOUR HANDS distinction. I already have four little girls in mind for this title when it releases in February.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Audience: Primary Genre: Biography Pre-Reading Strategy: Anticipation Guide An anticipation guide is a comprehension strategy used to activate students' prior knowledge and create curiosity about the book. I would create an anticipation guide with the following 4 statements. * There have always been women doctors. * Elizabeth Blackwell was first encouraged by her brother to become a doctor. * Elizabeth Blackwell had troubles getting accepted to medical school. * The students at medical school wanted Eli Audience: Primary Genre: Biography Pre-Reading Strategy: Anticipation Guide An anticipation guide is a comprehension strategy used to activate students' prior knowledge and create curiosity about the book. I would create an anticipation guide with the following 4 statements. * There have always been women doctors. * Elizabeth Blackwell was first encouraged by her brother to become a doctor. * Elizabeth Blackwell had troubles getting accepted to medical school. * The students at medical school wanted Elizabeth to be there with them. Students would determine whether they agreed or disagreed with each statement. Depending on the grade level, I would either have the students write their answers, share with a neighbor, or poll the responses of the entire class. I would then read the story aloud (or have the students read the book themselves, depending on reading level). Students would then go back and assess their initial expectations and reflect on what they now know from reading the story. I could see me using this book in several grade levels and could modify the format of the anticipation guide.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shiloah

    Loved the message. Love the story. Great short biography at the end. The pictures are bright and lovely.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Back in the 1830s, there were no women doctors, only men could have that career. But also growing up in the 1830s was a young girl who would end up changing that. Elizabeth Blackwell was not particularly well behaved: she was always exploring, working to toughen herself up, and even carried her brother over her head until he backed down. Elizabeth had not dreamed of becoming a doctor, but she was inspired when an friend mentioned how much nicer it would have been to be examined by a woman. When Back in the 1830s, there were no women doctors, only men could have that career. But also growing up in the 1830s was a young girl who would end up changing that. Elizabeth Blackwell was not particularly well behaved: she was always exploring, working to toughen herself up, and even carried her brother over her head until he backed down. Elizabeth had not dreamed of becoming a doctor, but she was inspired when an friend mentioned how much nicer it would have been to be examined by a woman. When Elizabeth started talking about her new dream, people mocked her and told her it was impossible. She applied to school after school, until finally the 29th school she applied for said yes! But Elizabeth would have to face additional challenges in school and beyond as well. This is the story of a woman who would not take no for an answer and the way that she changed the face of medicine along the way. Stone has written a very engaging biography of Blackwell. Much of the story is spent on her childhood and the challenges she faced getting into medical school. I love the image of a spunky young girl who just wants to explore and demonstrates determination from a very young age. She is an inspiring figure for youth, someone who discovered her dream and stood by it despite the many obstacles in her way and the mockery she endured. Stone’s author’s note continues Blackwell’s story and offers a photograph of the real Dr. Blackwell. Priceman’s illustrations done in gouache and India ink are filled with bright colors. They bring the past to life, showing the energy of the young Elizabeth Blackwell and incorporating the vistas and buildings of the 1800s. While they are bright and vibrant, they also serve to make sure that readers are cognizant of the period in which the book takes place. Blackwell is a real-life heroine that young readers should be aware of. This bright and welcoming new biography for younger readers is a welcome addition to library collections. Appropriate for ages 6-9.

  5. 4 out of 5

    KC

    Elizabeth Blackwell became the first female doctor but after graduating from Geneva Medical School in upstate New York in 1849, she and her sister, also a doctor, opened up The New York Infirmary for Women and Children and then a medial school just for women among other endeavors.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This is a thoughtful and educational children’s book about the first female physician, Elizabeth Blackwell, and the challenges and obstacles she encountered during her career.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Maureen

    1. Twin Text: Bad Astrid by Eileen Brennan (2013) 2. Rationale: Elizabeth Blackwell went to medical school despite all of the male students that attended Geneva Medical School in upstate New York and community members that surrounded it. She was very determined and a bit stubborn. She was not going to let their opinion affect her attending school. Little Astrid was very stubborn in her own ways but ultimately just wanted a friend once she moved to this new town. I would discuss with students that 1. Twin Text: Bad Astrid by Eileen Brennan (2013) 2. Rationale: Elizabeth Blackwell went to medical school despite all of the male students that attended Geneva Medical School in upstate New York and community members that surrounded it. She was very determined and a bit stubborn. She was not going to let their opinion affect her attending school. Little Astrid was very stubborn in her own ways but ultimately just wanted a friend once she moved to this new town. I would discuss with students that it is important to set goals and don't let anyone tell you that you can't achieve those goals. I would also focus on both characters how they went about achieving their goals, one in a driven, positive way and the other in a negative, bossy way. I would share what would be the better path to travel on to achieve the goal they are focused on. 3. The text structure would be chronological sequence and problem and solution. A strategy application I would use is the Venn diagram. I would have the students compare both main characters. 4. Book Review: (2013, March 2). Horn Book Magazine. http://www.booksinprint.com.leo.lib.u...#

  8. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    There are more and more great picture book biographies being published about ordinary people who did extraordinary things. I love it. This is another great one to add to the list. Elizabeth Blackwell was clearly a strong-willed person from the time she was little. I loved the examples the author shares illustrating this, for example carrying her brother over her head until he gave in on whatever it was they fought about, and sleeping on a hard floor to 'toughen' herself up. I also really liked t There are more and more great picture book biographies being published about ordinary people who did extraordinary things. I love it. This is another great one to add to the list. Elizabeth Blackwell was clearly a strong-willed person from the time she was little. I loved the examples the author shares illustrating this, for example carrying her brother over her head until he gave in on whatever it was they fought about, and sleeping on a hard floor to 'toughen' herself up. I also really liked the details about how she didn't set out to become a doctor, she didn't even like being around blood or sickness when she was younger. But once the idea was planted in her mind, she persisted until she made her dream a reality, despite a tremendous amount of opposition. I love stories like this because they are inspiring and true! The illustrations by Marjorie Priceman are darling and match the spunky tone of the writing to a tee. The bright colors and expressive faces add a great deal to the enjoyment of the story. I highly recommend this as not only a great picture book biography, but just an awesome story period.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Holly Mueller

    Elizabeth Blackwell defied all odds when she decided she wanted to be a doctor in the 1830s. I loved the snippets about her determination and strong will - she once carried her brother over her head until he backed down from their fight, and she tried sleeping onthe hard floor just to toughen herself up. I thought it was interesting she hadn't always wanted to be a doctor, but when a friend suggested she consider it, there was a seed planted that started to grow. Despite rejection after rejectio Elizabeth Blackwell defied all odds when she decided she wanted to be a doctor in the 1830s. I loved the snippets about her determination and strong will - she once carried her brother over her head until he backed down from their fight, and she tried sleeping onthe hard floor just to toughen herself up. I thought it was interesting she hadn't always wanted to be a doctor, but when a friend suggested she consider it, there was a seed planted that started to grow. Despite rejection after rejection, she continued to pursue her goal until she achieved it and graduated from medical school in 1849. According to the author's note, she continued to overcome obstacles and opened the first hospital run by women, for women, a medical school just for women, and helped start the National Health Society. Pretty amazing! I also enjoyed the energetic, vibrant illustrations by Marjorie Priceman. My students and I are going to Skype Tanya Leet Stone on World Read Aloud Day - I'm looking forward to sharing this excellent new title with them so we can discuss it with her!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Elizabeth Blackwell is a strong willed girl who can be anything she puts her mind to. But, in the 1960's a woman being a doctor was unheard of. This doesn't stop Elizabeth from applying to as many medical schools as possible until she is accepted into one. Nor does this stop Elizabeth from being the top student in her medical school class. Thanks to Elizabeth Blackwell, women can now become doctors! Elizabeth Blackwell is a strong willed girl who can be anything she puts her mind to. But, in the 1960's a woman being a doctor was unheard of. This doesn't stop Elizabeth from applying to as many medical schools as possible until she is accepted into one. Nor does this stop Elizabeth from being the top student in her medical school class. Thanks to Elizabeth Blackwell, women can now become doctors!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Gary

    As a woman, have you ever really thought about what it was like when women were seen only as wives and mothers! I know I sure don't think about it much but after reading this book to my students, I really feel so privileged to be in the position I am today. This book is a excellent depiction of how far we have come as a country. My students were blown away that women were not viewed as equals and some even said, "No way Ms. G I am a girl and I can be whatever I want to be." But what if you could As a woman, have you ever really thought about what it was like when women were seen only as wives and mothers! I know I sure don't think about it much but after reading this book to my students, I really feel so privileged to be in the position I am today. This book is a excellent depiction of how far we have come as a country. My students were blown away that women were not viewed as equals and some even said, "No way Ms. G I am a girl and I can be whatever I want to be." But what if you couldn't would you have the courage to stand up to those who told you NO? This book is great for grades K-5, but there are some more complex words so reading aloud to K-1 would be more appropriate. This book would be great to use when teaching your children about the biography genre or even when you talk about treating others equal. Students are really taken back at how the world used to be and I think it is a good way to teach them the history or our country, and why it is always so important to have dreams to work towards even at a young age. The illustrations in this book are vibrant and fit the text well so students are able to use the illustrations to understand the text, which is important at the younger grades. I chose this book as a WOW book because I haven't read many picture book biographies that make me and the students comment on almost every page because the story is so intriguing. I also enjoy the real photo and additional facts about Elizabeth Blackwell at the end of the book. It is a great story about courage and following your dreams, and everyone can relate to that.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Britney

    Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors?: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell By: Tanya Lee Stone Student: I loved reading this book. I was unfamiliar with the Doctor Elizabeth Blackwell before reading about her, but I learned that she was driven and determined to reach her dream in life. Originally, Elizabeth didn't want to become a doctor medical practices made her sick and women weren't allowed to become doctors. That changed when her friend Mary got sick and confessed she would rather have a woman docto Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors?: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell By: Tanya Lee Stone Student: I loved reading this book. I was unfamiliar with the Doctor Elizabeth Blackwell before reading about her, but I learned that she was driven and determined to reach her dream in life. Originally, Elizabeth didn't want to become a doctor medical practices made her sick and women weren't allowed to become doctors. That changed when her friend Mary got sick and confessed she would rather have a woman doctor taking care of her. This light a fire under Elizabeth and she started applying to medical schools. However, because of the time period she was rejected by over 20 schools. Once she finally got accepted she was mocked for her dream. Elizabeth worked hard though and was top in her class. This booked showed me how woman were not given the same rights as men but Elizabeth worked hard to be accepted and reach her goals. Teacher: As an elementary school teacher, I would love to incorporate this book into a lesson. Elizabeth Blackwell is an awesome way to teach character education such as perseverance or social studies lessons about women's rights and biographies. She teachers children that no dream of theirs can be taken away as long as they are determined and work hard to reach it. It is also a tool to teach that although you may be mocked or shut down they shouldn't give up. I could incorporate multiple books about men and women that over came struggles to reach their dreams. I also really liked this book because the illustrations were so well done with bright colors that aligned so well with the text.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    I did not deliberately group two books by Tanya Lee Stone close together on my "to read" shelf. However, it did happen and it gave me more admiration for Stone, as well as Elizabeth Blackwell. I did not expect to learn anything new about Blackwell since I've admired her since I was a child and have read several biographies on her. Nonetheless I did learn something new: that she had adopted a girl and raised her as a daughter. My point being more that even in a beginning biography meant for perha I did not deliberately group two books by Tanya Lee Stone close together on my "to read" shelf. However, it did happen and it gave me more admiration for Stone, as well as Elizabeth Blackwell. I did not expect to learn anything new about Blackwell since I've admired her since I was a child and have read several biographies on her. Nonetheless I did learn something new: that she had adopted a girl and raised her as a daughter. My point being more that even in a beginning biography meant for perhaps grade 2-3, Stone was able to toss in information that I hadn't known. Stone is gifted at all levels of youth literature. We have fiction by her and we have nonfiction from YA to this one meant for beginning level students. Her theme was to inform kids that once girls couldn't be doctors and by implication, remind kids, especially girls, that they can now be anything they want to be. Certainly I can see myself eating this book up as a child (I had wanted to be a doctor, and my approach was to read biographies of famous people in medicine and the history of medicine and science. The career choice didn't happen, but the interest remained.) This book is perhaps not amazing, although Stone packed a huge amount of information into her two page biography after the main picture book story, but I think it will be a very exciting book for ambitious young girls to pick up. I would consider this closer to a 4 than a 5 star book simply because it didn't blow me away with astonishment, but I rounded the score upward for producing such a useful book for kids.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Clark

    This book is a Children's Biography of Elizabeth Blackwell- one of America's first female doctors. The story begins when Elizabeth is an adventurous child with a lot of chutzpah for a girl at that time. As she grows older, a friend of Elizabeth's mentioned that it might be nice to be seen by a female doctor for once, and that inspires Elizabeth to want to become one herself! She applies to many, many schools and is rejected, but finally one school accepts her and she is able to attain her goal o This book is a Children's Biography of Elizabeth Blackwell- one of America's first female doctors. The story begins when Elizabeth is an adventurous child with a lot of chutzpah for a girl at that time. As she grows older, a friend of Elizabeth's mentioned that it might be nice to be seen by a female doctor for once, and that inspires Elizabeth to want to become one herself! She applies to many, many schools and is rejected, but finally one school accepts her and she is able to attain her goal of becoming a doctor. This book is appropriate for elementary aged children, and depicts an admirable female role model as she entered a male dominated field. This book tackles gender roles and women in the workforce in a very empowering way. The story is interesting to children and includes a rich plot with a conflict and resolution. Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors depicts Elizabeth Blackwell in a very realistic, deep way, that children could easily relate to. The illustrations are bright and vivid, and helpful in keeping children's attention. As a woman herself, Tanya Lee Stone is able to depict this story with no negative stereotypes of women presented.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Dickemper

    I love the fun and conversational style of Tanya Lee Stone's narration, the inspirational story, and Marjorie Priceman's playful illustrations! This is a great and obvious choice for women's history, but the sassy narrative style and the story about overcoming obstacles has universal appeal. Any kid who's ever been told he (or she) "can't" grow up to be something will identify with young Elizabeth and find something to appreciate here. The bright illustrations call to mind both Raschka and Bemel I love the fun and conversational style of Tanya Lee Stone's narration, the inspirational story, and Marjorie Priceman's playful illustrations! This is a great and obvious choice for women's history, but the sassy narrative style and the story about overcoming obstacles has universal appeal. Any kid who's ever been told he (or she) "can't" grow up to be something will identify with young Elizabeth and find something to appreciate here. The bright illustrations call to mind both Raschka and Bemelmans, making this a natural book to share as a read aloud.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    A picture book biography about the first woman doctor. Text is well written. It speaks directly to the reader and is empowering. Anecdotes that reveal Elizabeth's strong character make up the majority of the text which makes it so engaging as it's not merely just a collection of impressive facts. Illustrations were rendered with gouache and india ink on watercolor paper and excel at capturing the strong opinions of Elizabeth's critics. Following the story is an author's note and a list of source A picture book biography about the first woman doctor. Text is well written. It speaks directly to the reader and is empowering. Anecdotes that reveal Elizabeth's strong character make up the majority of the text which makes it so engaging as it's not merely just a collection of impressive facts. Illustrations were rendered with gouache and india ink on watercolor paper and excel at capturing the strong opinions of Elizabeth's critics. Following the story is an author's note and a list of sources.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    I wonder who this book is for. It is filed under juvenile biography at my library. But the cute, clever (clichéd) text--"Elizabeth Blackwell, that's who. A tiny wisp of a girl who wanted to explore around every corner and who never walked away from a challenge"--is more suited to an easy book. All the really interesting facts about Blackwell are in the two-page author's note at the back; so it's not a good resource for a school assignment. My grandmother who was born in Turkey in 1900 became a p I wonder who this book is for. It is filed under juvenile biography at my library. But the cute, clever (clichéd) text--"Elizabeth Blackwell, that's who. A tiny wisp of a girl who wanted to explore around every corner and who never walked away from a challenge"--is more suited to an easy book. All the really interesting facts about Blackwell are in the two-page author's note at the back; so it's not a good resource for a school assignment. My grandmother who was born in Turkey in 1900 became a physician. I don't feel this book does justice to her and earlier generations of women doctors.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Thrilled to add this one to my bookshelf. I love this format for biography, and I could use it as a mentor text for students to create their own biographies as they research. Full review http://www.mariaselke.com/2013/04/who... Check out the link at IndieBound to find a local independent bookstore or to order from one online. http://www.indiebound.org/book/978080... Thrilled to add this one to my bookshelf. I love this format for biography, and I could use it as a mentor text for students to create their own biographies as they research. Full review http://www.mariaselke.com/2013/04/who... Check out the link at IndieBound to find a local independent bookstore or to order from one online. http://www.indiebound.org/book/978080...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Adamson

    This is a really great picture book exploring the story of Elizabeth Blackwell, the girl who went onto become the first woman doctor in the U.S. Beautiful illustrations and provided lots of background information to help explore the problem, the boundaries, and how she overcame it all.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    Tanya Lee Stone's chatty style and interesting research will engage young readers in this book about the first, modern female doctor, Elizabeth Blackwell. Tanya Lee Stone's chatty style and interesting research will engage young readers in this book about the first, modern female doctor, Elizabeth Blackwell.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A wonderful introduction to America's first female doctor. A wonderful introduction to America's first female doctor.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Gelson

    I need to share this title and often! Inspirational. Motivating. Important history. Loved the accessible style of both illustrator and author!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Interesting book. Shows determination. Mom rates 4 stars and kids 3 stars. They liked it but wouldn't read it again. Interesting book. Shows determination. Mom rates 4 stars and kids 3 stars. They liked it but wouldn't read it again.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura McLoughlin

    Great intro to America's first woman doctor. Great intro to America's first woman doctor.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    Cute illustrations, but I didn't like vibe this book gave off. Medical school is such a lark! I found the author's note at the end more informative and interesting than the rest of the book. Cute illustrations, but I didn't like vibe this book gave off. Medical school is such a lark! I found the author's note at the end more informative and interesting than the rest of the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    H

    I am ecstatic that girls today have books like these -- they are so important to show young girls that they can do anything they set their mind to.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This true story was so inspiring. All little girls need to know anything is possible. The illustrations were colorful and fun. A truly great book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeimy

    Cute picture book about the U.S. ‘s first female doctor.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jina Suh

    Biography Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors? is a fantastic book about Elizabeth Blackwell - the first female doctor. The book takes us through the journey of her life - specifically, the trials and tribulations she encountered just because she was pursuing a "male career". At the time, women were only thought to take on one of four careers: wives and mothers (shocker), teachers, or seamstresses. But, Blackwell refused to let the ridicule and resistance stop her...defying all odds. It was through h Biography Who Says Women Can't Be Doctors? is a fantastic book about Elizabeth Blackwell - the first female doctor. The book takes us through the journey of her life - specifically, the trials and tribulations she encountered just because she was pursuing a "male career". At the time, women were only thought to take on one of four careers: wives and mothers (shocker), teachers, or seamstresses. But, Blackwell refused to let the ridicule and resistance stop her...defying all odds. It was through her hard work - her determination and persistence - that she was able to attend medical school, graduate from medical school, and become the first female doctor. YGG, Elizabeth Blackwell! I would use the book in Grades 2-4. I would use this book as a read aloud with my lower elementary grades students, but would allow my upper elementary grades students the option to read it on their own. One way I would use the book in my classroom is to introduce a social studies lesson (or unit) on important people in history who brought about social change. I would read aloud the book to engage students about the topic of social change. But before reading, I would let them preview the book to get an idea of what it is about. And as a class, we would fill out a KWL chart about what we know and want to know about living during that time period. Another way I would use the book in my classroom is for students to create timelines - just like we did in ELM 460! I would instruct students to pick and choose the "most important" events and/or stages in Blackwell's life. This would teach students how to identify the main ideas in the book, as well as how to filter through information - determining what information is important vs. what information is just interesting (determining importance). This is a WOW book to me because I love love love reading and hearing about powerful women. Elizabeth Blackwell is a powerful women who broke gender stereotypes, opening new doors for other women in the world. This is important because I think this (gender stereotypes) is a topic we need to be aware of - and address - in our classrooms. And if I am being honest, I had never heard of Elizabeth Blackwell before reading the book...but after reading the book, I think it would a fun - yet educational - read for all students! NOTE: The book is an e-text. I read it on Overdrive (through METRC). The link to the e-text is listed below. https://ced.overdrive.com/media/1807205

  30. 4 out of 5

    June

    Elizabeth became a doctor at a friend's request, "blood made her queasy." She was refused by 28 medical schools and only accepted at one, because the male students voted yes as a joke thinking the school would never accept her. "Some people are afraid of anything new or different." Of course "Elizabeth graduated ...with the highest grades in the whole class!" Wonderful Author's Note talks about how no one would hire her or come to her own office. So Elizabeth started holding free clinics. Over th Elizabeth became a doctor at a friend's request, "blood made her queasy." She was refused by 28 medical schools and only accepted at one, because the male students voted yes as a joke thinking the school would never accept her. "Some people are afraid of anything new or different." Of course "Elizabeth graduated ...with the highest grades in the whole class!" Wonderful Author's Note talks about how no one would hire her or come to her own office. So Elizabeth started holding free clinics. Over the years Elizabeth and her sister, Emily, had so many female patients they started their own hospital. Elizabeth opened a women's medical school in New York and one in London, and helped start the National Health Society.

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