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813 by Maurice Leblanc, Fiction, Historical, Action & Adventure, Mystery & Detective

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ArsEne Lupin is a fictional gentleman thief and master of disguise. Lupin was featured in 17 novels and 39 novellas by Leblanc, with the novellas or short stories collected into book form for a total of 24 books. The manager went himself, accompanied by Chapman. A few minutes after, he returned alone, running, with every mark of consternation on his face. "Well?" "Dead!" "M ArsEne Lupin is a fictional gentleman thief and master of disguise. Lupin was featured in 17 novels and 39 novellas by Leblanc, with the novellas or short stories collected into book form for a total of 24 books. The manager went himself, accompanied by Chapman. A few minutes after, he returned alone, running, with every mark of consternation on his face. "Well?" "Dead!" "Murdered?" "Yes." "Oh, by thunder, how clever these scoundrels are!" roared M. Lenormand, "Off with you, Gourel, and have the doors of the hotel locked. . . . Watch every outlet. . . . And you, Mr. Manager, please take us to Gustave Beudot's room." The manager led the way. But as they left the room, M. Lenormand stooped and picked up a tiny little round piece of paper, on which his eyes had already fixed themselves. It was a label surrounded with a blue border and marked with the number 813. He put it in his pocket, on chance, and joined the others. . . .


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ArsEne Lupin is a fictional gentleman thief and master of disguise. Lupin was featured in 17 novels and 39 novellas by Leblanc, with the novellas or short stories collected into book form for a total of 24 books. The manager went himself, accompanied by Chapman. A few minutes after, he returned alone, running, with every mark of consternation on his face. "Well?" "Dead!" "M ArsEne Lupin is a fictional gentleman thief and master of disguise. Lupin was featured in 17 novels and 39 novellas by Leblanc, with the novellas or short stories collected into book form for a total of 24 books. The manager went himself, accompanied by Chapman. A few minutes after, he returned alone, running, with every mark of consternation on his face. "Well?" "Dead!" "Murdered?" "Yes." "Oh, by thunder, how clever these scoundrels are!" roared M. Lenormand, "Off with you, Gourel, and have the doors of the hotel locked. . . . Watch every outlet. . . . And you, Mr. Manager, please take us to Gustave Beudot's room." The manager led the way. But as they left the room, M. Lenormand stooped and picked up a tiny little round piece of paper, on which his eyes had already fixed themselves. It was a label surrounded with a blue border and marked with the number 813. He put it in his pocket, on chance, and joined the others. . . .

30 review for 813 by Maurice Leblanc, Fiction, Historical, Action & Adventure, Mystery & Detective

  1. 4 out of 5

    Florin Pitea

    A bit diluted with inconsequential dialogue here and there, but nice reading, regardless.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Axslingin

    A tale of incredulity, buffoonery, naivete', comedy, stupidity, iconoclasm, icon worship, self destruction, conceit, and staggering inefficiency, none of it intentional. What promised to be a ghastly detective story just turned out to be ghastly. The story revolves around Arsen Lupin, a beloved French scumbag that would steal your grandmother's purse if the thought anything was in it, and although not the type that would kill himself, always seemed to be in the middle of controversy when someone A tale of incredulity, buffoonery, naivete', comedy, stupidity, iconoclasm, icon worship, self destruction, conceit, and staggering inefficiency, none of it intentional. What promised to be a ghastly detective story just turned out to be ghastly. The story revolves around Arsen Lupin, a beloved French scumbag that would steal your grandmother's purse if the thought anything was in it, and although not the type that would kill himself, always seemed to be in the middle of controversy when someone was murdered. And there were plenty of murders in this story. If cloak and dagger action if what you're looking for, you may be amused by this book. If you're looking for any semblance of believability, you're likely to be quite disappointed, as I was. Lupin, a burgler of some fame in France was engaged in his latest exploit, that was to extract some kind of information from his last victim that would lead him to a ridiculous trimuph of European proportions. But, as Lupin was about to find out, he isn't the only low life in France. You would think he would have known that with the reputation that was bestowed upon him by Leblanc, but it would have ruined the story if he did have that clue. So the story continued. The story starts out with an improbable series of murders at a hotel, and with the withering array of characters introduced in the first several chapters, you have no idea who or why these folks were being knocked off. Added to that, several of the characters used aliases that were used interchageably by Leblanc, so even keeping track of who was who became a challenge. Lupin himself used a few different names, along with some ludicrous disguises that characters fell for hook, line and sinker. The French people should be appalled at the suggestion of the their lummoxed brains, that couldn't tell that Clark Kent without glasses was Superman. So it was though with their beloved Lupin, a man who could hoodwink an entire police force with a change of clothes and some glasses. How his credentials passed muster is anybody's guess, but then this is fiction, isn't it? Lupin apparently was able to control the press at will, with the local paper printing anything he had to say. In fact, he was able to control the police, and just about anything else he wanted as well, even having a few on his payroll. They must not do alot of policing in France, because those cops seemed to have an inordinate amount of time to do Lupin's bidding. Of course, Lupin seemed to have an inordinate amount of cash to throw around, and if you believe Leblanc, just about everybody in France is on the take if the price is right, and Lupin seemed to always know what that price might be, no matter who they were. The dearth of case Lupin threw around must have been acquired from his prior burglaries. We never get that, but we do get that he had a network of thugs at his beck and call. From my perspective, plenty of questions throughout. Who was this Beaupre character, and why choose him? The reasoning Leblanc presents seems rather weak, and his ultimate subservience to Lupin even weaker. Then there was Lenormand, if that is the proper spelling-yes, Lenormand, who has a brawl with a pack of thugs, and when it was all over-we have to assume it was over, he went to bed? You would think he'd be a little amped up, and even more cautious for the rest of the evening. Nope. Then there was the part where he was trapped in a secret tunnel with no way out. What was his response? You guessed it, he went to sleep. WTF? The ebook was littered with typos, so forgive me if something I say doesn't jibe with the actual story. I got the gist of it though. Or did I? Lupin did go to jail in this story, but since we're apparently talking about the keystone cops here, he wasn't there for long. But, while he was there, he devised a prison-genius communication system. Well, genius in the world of Maurice Leblanc. What the cops allowed the most wanted criminal in France was ridiculous enough, what he did in addition to those liberties was laughably goofy. Lupin was ostensibly seen as some kind of god (at least by Leblanc), but it's like there is an agreement with all the characters that they play this game. Any real detective would steamroll these dolts, both Lupin and his adversaries. Just a few incidents that added to the ambiance ridiculousness. At one point Lupin and some goons are headed down the road to some mysterious castle. A car drives by them and fires a couple of shots at them. Apparently, Lupin never deduced that these would be killers might show up at the very same castle they were going to! Then there was the scene where Lupin is drugged. They deduce that it was the coffee, but nobody bothers to check kitchen for any clues as to the identity of the drugger. Then there was the secret clock. I won't give that away, but I will say that the clock would have been smashed long before Lupin & Co. arrived. Like years before. Not in this story though. Then there was the scene that pitted Lupin against seven hardcore thugs. How do you think that worked out? Seven against one, well, it's not even fair i tell you. Then there was the unintentional comedy scene. Lupin sees a guy making eyes at the girl he wants and grabs him and tosses him out the window, smashing through tree limbs on the way down. What was the girls's response to Lupin's ass kicking exploits? How dare you! Well, it was quite rude of him. Lupin even crossed paths with the great English detective Holmlock Shears. Yes, decipher that anagram. But this is the great Arsene Lupin after all, a man elevated the to level of a prince (in more ways than one), by Leblanc.

  3. 5 out of 5

    idkhello

    That was so fucking sad??? Like?? I’ve read the book in English (translation that dates around 1910s) and it was hard to read 😔 thus I didn’t understand some of the plot points but it was SOO convoluted. On the one hand we’ve got boring descriptions of the investigation on the other hand we got Lupin being completely broken??? He cried so much in this book, he got poisoned, he didn’t want to live anymore, he fell in love, there was a lot of the moral dilemma. It saddens me but these parts made t That was so fucking sad??? Like?? I’ve read the book in English (translation that dates around 1910s) and it was hard to read 😔 thus I didn’t understand some of the plot points but it was SOO convoluted. On the one hand we’ve got boring descriptions of the investigation on the other hand we got Lupin being completely broken??? He cried so much in this book, he got poisoned, he didn’t want to live anymore, he fell in love, there was a lot of the moral dilemma. It saddens me but these parts made the book actually good. Spoiler: I cried when it turned out the girl he looked after was his daughter. I didn’t suppose I’d cry while reading a lupin novel 😭😭😭

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    DNF @ 27% The plot is far too convoluted for my liking, and I don't care enough about it to make an attempt at understanding it or continuing on with the story. I think this is also the last Lupin book that I'll be picking up for the forseeable future as I found that the quality of this book and book 3 are much lower than that of the first two books, so I don't really see a point in continuing on with the series. DNF @ 27% The plot is far too convoluted for my liking, and I don't care enough about it to make an attempt at understanding it or continuing on with the story. I think this is also the last Lupin book that I'll be picking up for the forseeable future as I found that the quality of this book and book 3 are much lower than that of the first two books, so I don't really see a point in continuing on with the series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cameron

    It breaks my heart to have to give this book 4 stars and not 5 but it is what it is. The book starts slow and you are not sure where it's going (not in a good way). But then the old Lupin starts to break out and the story gets dope. Really can say much as everything said would spoil the surprise but still a very solid book and I'm still moving on to the next one. Good read It breaks my heart to have to give this book 4 stars and not 5 but it is what it is. The book starts slow and you are not sure where it's going (not in a good way). But then the old Lupin starts to break out and the story gets dope. Really can say much as everything said would spoil the surprise but still a very solid book and I'm still moving on to the next one. Good read

  6. 5 out of 5

    Pavithraja Venkatesan

    It was so sad 😭 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kelvin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a 1910 book by French novelist Maurice Leblanc and is the fourth book in his gentleman burglar Arsene Lupin series. The setting is in early 1900s in France. The version I read came with a very good introduction by Otto Penzler. According to Penzler, he believes The Hollow Needle and 813 are the best books in the Lupin series. Penzler also described Lupin as ‘Unlike Fantomas, the other great criminal in French literature, Arsene Lupin is not violent or evil; his unlawful acts center on th This is a 1910 book by French novelist Maurice Leblanc and is the fourth book in his gentleman burglar Arsene Lupin series. The setting is in early 1900s in France. The version I read came with a very good introduction by Otto Penzler. According to Penzler, he believes The Hollow Needle and 813 are the best books in the Lupin series. Penzler also described Lupin as ‘Unlike Fantomas, the other great criminal in French literature, Arsene Lupin is not violent or evil; his unlawful acts center on thefts and clever cons rather than murder or anarchy.’ Having red Fantomas, I do agree with Penzler and may be that is the reason Lupin is so much more popular than Fantomas. Having said that, I do find 813 too long-winded and boring. The story is unnecessarily complex and convoluted and some of the Victorian sentimentalities of the period now read very dated. Spoiler Alert. The story is essentially a treasure hunt novel and a political thriller where competing forces race to get their hands on a secret stash of politically explosive letters, which then can be used to blackmail the German Emperor (the Kaiser) and help reestablish a disgraced prince’s heir to a small but geographically significant kingdom in Germany. In the process, Lupin found himself time after time being defeated and outsmarted by an unknown opponent. It was not until the very end that Lupin prevailed. The story really started years ago when Germany’s Chancellor Bismarck gave some super-sensitive and politically explosive documents to Prince Herman III, the Grand Duke of Zweilbrucken-Veldenz in Prussia, for safe-keeping. Herman III kept it in a secret place in his castle, called Veldenz Castle, in his Kingdom of Veldenz. Later, his subjects rebelled and the castle was badly damaged. After Herman III died, his son Prince Herman IV, who changed his name to Pierre Leduc, became penniless and lived in France. A rich businessman, Rudolf Kesselbach, discovered the existence of the secret documents and the situation of Pierre Leduc. Rudolf came up with a plan for power and money using that secret. He realized he needed to both hunt down Pierre Leduc and to find the hidden documents. When he was executing his plan, one day he was found murdered in his hotel, knifed to death. Soon thereafter, his secretary and a floor-waiter in the hotel was also found dead. Lupin’s calling card was found on Kesselbach’s body. Somebody was trying to frame the murders on Lupin. At that time, Lupin has been living for four years in Paris under the fake identity of Lenormand and he was at that time chief of Detective Service in the Paris police. Lupin (acting as Lenormand) tried to solve the case. He kept running into difficulties against his clever opponent. Soon, he found that Pierre Leduc (Prince Herman IV) has recently died. Lupin then came up with a scheme of his own. He tried to takeover Kesselbach’s original scheme to try to both control the young penniless Prince Herman IV and to find the compromising secret documents to blackmail the German Kaiser into recognizing Herman IV and to reinstate him to his kingdom, through which Lupin hoped to gain political and economic benefit. However, now that Prince Herman IV has died, Lupin decided to find a lookalike and make him disguise himself to replace the real Prince Herman IV. In the meantime, Lupin went to Veldenz Castle to try to find the missing letters. The title of the book, 813, refers to the clue to the hiding place of the secret documents. The numbers 8-1-3 add up to 12 and referred to the twelve room in the castle. Inside the room is a clock attached to a moveable wall. Lupin finally figured out if at exactly at midnight (12 o-clock) he pushes the buttons on the clock face representing 8, 1, and 3, the secret door in the wall would open. Inside the wall was a box that contained the letters. However, after Lupin opened the box, he realized he was too late. His secret adversary had already solved the puzzle and got the letters. Finally, Lupin found out the adversary who had consistently beaten him was actually the wife of the dead Rudolf Kesselbach. Mrs Kesselbach’s maiden name was Dolores de Malreich. Her family had generations ago had claim on the Kingdom of Veldenz and similar to Prince Herman IV, the family had fallen on hard times. After Dolores found out her husband’s scheme, she decided to takeover the scheme herself. She first killed her husband and framed Lupin. Then, she was going to find Pierre Leduc (Prince Herman IV), got him to marry her, and then to find the secret letters so she can blackmail the German Kaiser to reinstate Herman IV to be a Grand Duke to take over the Grand Duchy, the Kingdom of Veldenz. That would make her the Queen. In the end, when Dolores tried to kill Lupin, she lost the fight and Lupin ended up killing her. This is a very high body count book. Dolores had killed everybody around her during the course of the story, including her husband Rudolf, his secretary Chapman, the hotel’s floor waiter Beudot, Dolores’ two servants Gertrude and Suzanne, Mr. Kesselbach’s good friend Steinweg (who knew of the scheme), and Dolores’ own brother Raoul and Dolores’ own sister Isilda. This book also involves a lot of fake identities and fake names. All the key characters in the book seem to live with multiple identities and fake names. In the book, we were also told Lupin actually has a daughter called Genevieve Ernemont who is now a school teacher living with her “grandmother” who was in fact Lupin’s old servant Victoire. In the end, the substitute Pierre Leduc ended up killing himself as well when he discovered Dolores (who he had fallen in love with) has died. That ended Lupin’s dream. He did, however, recovered the secret documents and, as part of a deal he made with the German Kaiser, returned the documents to him.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Theo

    Readers used to the Arsène Lupin short stories may find this a bit of bore with plots within plots and Arsène being Arsène bragging and peacocking but it also has more character development of Arsène with him being firmly established as anti-hero even when he want to be a hero. Without giving away the plot the ending was worth it. Readers may think the story full of tropes and it certainly shares storylines with Sherlock Holmes but for a piece written in between 1900-1910 it would have been cons Readers used to the Arsène Lupin short stories may find this a bit of bore with plots within plots and Arsène being Arsène bragging and peacocking but it also has more character development of Arsène with him being firmly established as anti-hero even when he want to be a hero. Without giving away the plot the ending was worth it. Readers may think the story full of tropes and it certainly shares storylines with Sherlock Holmes but for a piece written in between 1900-1910 it would have been considered timely and full of interesting social details. It's not as chauvanistic as other works of the time but it's still of it's time and full of stereotypes and beliefs of that time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kkinugawa

    One of the most famous Arsene Lupin's stories. The book is about Arsene Lupin's investigation about the encryption "803" and "Apo on" which can affect on the whole lands of France and Germany, and during his investigation, he is going to fight against the evil murderer. The book was absolutely exciting in the sense of the way story develops and especially at the ending of the story. The book was also one of the best mystery books I've ever read, and from this point of view, I would like to recom One of the most famous Arsene Lupin's stories. The book is about Arsene Lupin's investigation about the encryption "803" and "Apo on" which can affect on the whole lands of France and Germany, and during his investigation, he is going to fight against the evil murderer. The book was absolutely exciting in the sense of the way story develops and especially at the ending of the story. The book was also one of the best mystery books I've ever read, and from this point of view, I would like to recommend this book to every readers.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lynne Faubert

    I grew up reading Arsene Lupin, my best childhood series, and this was my favourite at the time. As the novels progress, they get darker. But anyone who wants to read Lupin (I don't dare revisit in the fear I may be disappointed) should really start at the beginning. I grew up reading Arsene Lupin, my best childhood series, and this was my favourite at the time. As the novels progress, they get darker. But anyone who wants to read Lupin (I don't dare revisit in the fear I may be disappointed) should really start at the beginning.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    After being accused of murder, Arsene Lupin, heads the investigation himself and seeks to clear his name...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

    Arsene Lupin is far from a serious read, but it's fun, light, entertaining and very mustache-twirly with a hint of quaint Victorian and parody. What's not to enjoy? Arsene Lupin is far from a serious read, but it's fun, light, entertaining and very mustache-twirly with a hint of quaint Victorian and parody. What's not to enjoy?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sana

    I’ve given it a chance to observe my attention but nothing happens

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chopin Fangirl

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. If anyone thought Hollow Needle was serious, this is even more so. Firstly let’s do a death count. (MAJOR SPOILERS HERE!! SERIOUSLY, FOR THIS BOOK THE WHOLE POINT ARE THE TWISTS, SO IF YOU HAVEN’T READ IT YET STOP READING THIS REVIEW!!!!!) Dolores Kesselbach/Letitia de Malreich has killed 9 people, including: - Her own husband - Her two siblings - Her two servants - An old friend of the family - Three innocent strangers Arsène Lupin has caused the death of three/six people, including: - Dolores Kesselba If anyone thought Hollow Needle was serious, this is even more so. Firstly let’s do a death count. (MAJOR SPOILERS HERE!! SERIOUSLY, FOR THIS BOOK THE WHOLE POINT ARE THE TWISTS, SO IF YOU HAVEN’T READ IT YET STOP READING THIS REVIEW!!!!!) Dolores Kesselbach/Letitia de Malreich has killed 9 people, including: - Her own husband - Her two siblings - Her two servants - An old friend of the family - Three innocent strangers Arsène Lupin has caused the death of three/six people, including: - Dolores Kesselbach, whom he loved - Leon Massier, an innocent man - Pierre Leduc, whom he was manipulating this whole time and almost killed him before his successful suicide later on - Maybe three highwaymen, it was kinda glossed over Arsène Lupin has also manipulated people in the following ways: - Tried to trick his DAUGHTER into marrying this imposter-noble-dude to bring her glory, without considering what she herself wants - Forcing this poet into attempting suicide, only to rescue him at the last minute and scare him, forcing him to pretend to be a dude no one knows anything about to be his puppet and THREATENING HIM WITH A GUN RIGHT AFTER HE ATTEMPTED SUICIDE, and FORCES HIM TO CHOP OFF HIS OWN FINGER… yikes. Of course, there were some of the usual Lupinesque shenanigans that are comical or completely absurd, but I feel like most of the book was dedicated more to his distress and the constantly imminent feeling of murder. Yeah. Kinda tense. And you thought that Lupin was a good guy, didn’t ya? Ha, nope. He even stated as much in the first chapter. Sure, he still feels awful about murder (ironically, his reflection on all the horrible things Dolores did made him accidentally kill her), but he’s WAYYYY more manipulative here. Honestly, I feel like the only sane and lucid (as in, not confused by all these STUFF) person is Victoire. Basically everything she says makes sense. That said, I do feel like this is an awesome book. Probably less moral “hero”, but somewhat the same traits, ish, and very interesting. Especially when he’s struggling with how much power he really has, his moral battle with the murderer, and his bitter self-reflections and depression after the three murders. In other words, perfect book for those more interested in some serious/plot-central stuff, as opposed to a pure entertaining passage-of-time thing… for that read Edgar Jepson’s “Arsène Lupin”.

  15. 5 out of 5

    The Usual

    I wanted to like this. I have, may God forgive me, a bit of a weakness for Lupin, and I'm prepared to put up with an off translation and the inconvenience of reading on a screen to indulge it. This, though, this is where I think Lupin and I part company. Sorry, but it seems to have all Leblanc's faults writ large. There. An opinion. See? Now all I need to do is back it up. So, in my view, in the first half, each chapter was written, at speed, backwards. Which sounds stupid. I know what I mean, b I wanted to like this. I have, may God forgive me, a bit of a weakness for Lupin, and I'm prepared to put up with an off translation and the inconvenience of reading on a screen to indulge it. This, though, this is where I think Lupin and I part company. Sorry, but it seems to have all Leblanc's faults writ large. There. An opinion. See? Now all I need to do is back it up. So, in my view, in the first half, each chapter was written, at speed, backwards. Which sounds stupid. I know what I mean, but it would be nice if you did too. Let me try again. I think Leblanc, for each chapter, and without really considering either the previous instalment or what might happen next, decided on a cliffhanger ending, wrote the cliffhanger ending, and then tried to join the cliffhanger ending to the end of the previous cliffhanger ending within a given wordcount. And then stuck the thing in the post and knocked off for lunch. At one point I swear he decided on the end of a chapter - detective in danger of drowning - dashed off the chapter, realised he'd undershot, and allowed the poor chap to escape. Into the arms of a villain. Who ties him up and dumps him in the river. Oh dear me! I know - think I know - that planning wasn't Leblanc's strong suit, but there are limits. The action to word ratio is insanely high, the point of view bounces around too much, there's so much smoke blowing around you can barely see the mirrors. In places it's more like a play: stage-direction, dialogue, and nothing else. It's too sparse, it's too linear, it's all much, much too much. Is the second half any better? Well, perhaps. A bit. The story settles down a touch. Leblanc finally works out where he's going - I mean, I don't especially like where he goes, he doesn't know when to stop, and it only sort-of-vaguely works because everyone in Europe is incredibly stupid, but there does seem to be some kind of plan - and there are a couple of decent scenes. Lupin develops a slightly more complex character - patriotic, gallant, concerned with a kind of honour, but still frivolous, selfish and arrogant. I still like the cheek of the man, but I think, I really think, it's time we parted company. Farewell, Lupin. We will not meet again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ramona Cantaragiu

    This was my first encounter with Arsene Lupin so I've decided to be a bit more lenient and overlook many of the aspects that usually put me off when reading mystery novels. For one, I like the plots to be a little more related to mundane affairs and less about stuff that would belong in James Bond movies (the whole spiel with the letters that could forever ruin the relationship between France and Germany was not something that I found appealing at all). In addition, although I love overpowered c This was my first encounter with Arsene Lupin so I've decided to be a bit more lenient and overlook many of the aspects that usually put me off when reading mystery novels. For one, I like the plots to be a little more related to mundane affairs and less about stuff that would belong in James Bond movies (the whole spiel with the letters that could forever ruin the relationship between France and Germany was not something that I found appealing at all). In addition, although I love overpowered characters that always have an ace up their sleeve, I don't like to be taken by surprise by things that seem far fetched even if you attempt to suspend you disbelief and just go with the flow (there is a plot twist at one point in the book that simply made me laugh out loud and think of Sergiu Nicolaescu - a famous Romanian director and actor about whom we have a joke here that goes something like director - Sergiu Nicolaescu, main actor - Sergiu Nicolaescu, screen writer - Sergiu Nicolaescu, and in the role of the horse - Sergiu Nicolaescu). In spite of these issues, I did enjoy the book because I like the idea of a gentleman thief (Locke Lamora anyone?) who masterminds intricate plots in order to get what he wants. I think I need to read a bit more to see if I actually like Arsene Lupin as a character or not.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rick Pelz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I think the characters themselves aren’t terribly well developed; Lupin himself, who’s supposed to be some genius, falls for the same tricks and comes to conclusions some ten pages after the reader does on some occasions. That gets old once he starts monologuing. Baupre was almost interesting, but nothing much comes of him. The ending seemed a bit rushed and, character wise, doesn’t make sense. The killer, while having a compelling reveal, has something of a lazy motive that could be so much bet I think the characters themselves aren’t terribly well developed; Lupin himself, who’s supposed to be some genius, falls for the same tricks and comes to conclusions some ten pages after the reader does on some occasions. That gets old once he starts monologuing. Baupre was almost interesting, but nothing much comes of him. The ending seemed a bit rushed and, character wise, doesn’t make sense. The killer, while having a compelling reveal, has something of a lazy motive that could be so much better. While it makes sense that the killer was written this way, the villain is not the main attraction here. But as far as your over the top mystery novel, this one’s solid. Lupin pulls crazy stunts as usual and irritates law enforcement and people of power; nothing new and everything we love about the man. Nevertheless, I’d recommend a Sherlock book first, in my experience they’re simply better.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yami

    I think this one was a rollercoaster, I mean you can see the intelligence of Lupin his devilish luck one moment, then his defeat despair and his bad luck the next moment..in the end I couldn't but feel but a mixture of admiration, pity and love for him...and now that am re-reading the novels again, you must admire such strong character, what he passed through, especially in his love life is very sad, and yet he struggles and fights for life...it is kind of sad that now I see his gloomy side of l I think this one was a rollercoaster, I mean you can see the intelligence of Lupin his devilish luck one moment, then his defeat despair and his bad luck the next moment..in the end I couldn't but feel but a mixture of admiration, pity and love for him...and now that am re-reading the novels again, you must admire such strong character, what he passed through, especially in his love life is very sad, and yet he struggles and fights for life...it is kind of sad that now I see his gloomy side of life, I always saw Lupin as the sarcastic ,funny intelligent thief, but in this adventure fate was truly mean to him and pushed him hard to the knees, yet he gets up again and again..Arsene Lupin is not to be down for long.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Olli Lukkari

    Lupin, what a character! I don't why I seem to like criminal characters so much in fiction, be it Artemis Fowl or Hannibal Lecter, or now my new interest Arsène Lupin, the intellect of criminal masterminds is something fascinating to witness in the pages of a book. The book made me laugh a loud many times, such was the audacity and adventures of Lupin. All in all, few hundred pages were quickly read and I'm going to continue to read more Lupin books in the future as well. Lupin, what a character! I don't why I seem to like criminal characters so much in fiction, be it Artemis Fowl or Hannibal Lecter, or now my new interest Arsène Lupin, the intellect of criminal masterminds is something fascinating to witness in the pages of a book. The book made me laugh a loud many times, such was the audacity and adventures of Lupin. All in all, few hundred pages were quickly read and I'm going to continue to read more Lupin books in the future as well.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gypsi

    Arséne Lupin, gentleman thief and adventurer, appears to have met his equal when he is framed for murder, a situation which leads him to match wits with a most devious opponent. This is a fun book, with many twists and turns, and though I guessed the biggest surprise, I enjoyed it thoroughly. Leblanc writes engaging prose (or the translator is particularly good) and the fast-paced plot, incredible as it is, makes for an entertaining read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Hm. Made me reconsider my earlier endorsement of the Lupin stories. The novel form seems beyond LeBlanc's reach. The first half is a complete mess, badly written, an unlikeable main character, and absolutely no one including Lupin and the reader can have any idea what is going on. And yet . . . . There are themes of identity, existentialism, nationalism, the will to power, the ultimate failure of human ambition, the darkness of love . . . It's a slog, but with some redeeming features. Hm. Made me reconsider my earlier endorsement of the Lupin stories. The novel form seems beyond LeBlanc's reach. The first half is a complete mess, badly written, an unlikeable main character, and absolutely no one including Lupin and the reader can have any idea what is going on. And yet . . . . There are themes of identity, existentialism, nationalism, the will to power, the ultimate failure of human ambition, the darkness of love . . . It's a slog, but with some redeeming features.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bill Suits

    I really wanted to like this book. The beginning is excellent I felt. Actually the first half is very good, then things get a little weird. I just did not care for the ending and how it was all pull together. Maybe you will.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Too many twists and turns for my liking. Brilliantly written. Well developed characters, but some of the characters had multiple personalites and names so it was a bit hard to follow. The late 19th century writing style was also a bit much for me. But with that said, I did enjoy the book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    David Mann

    Well, this turned out to have a very complicated plot, though satisfyingly misdirecting. As an intermediate French learner, it was readable, but challenging, mostly due to the many characters and twisty plot.

  25. 4 out of 5

    izzkhmd

    cool! once i thought that mr detective was Lupin too, lol but it was weird so i didn't really meant on it. just... amazing plot-twist yea i like this. but the translate was terribly bad which is made the book feels heavy cool! once i thought that mr detective was Lupin too, lol but it was weird so i didn't really meant on it. just... amazing plot-twist yea i like this. but the translate was terribly bad which is made the book feels heavy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Great book!!! For me, Lupin is an interesting take on crime-focused novels. I love the “gentleman-burglar” aspect of his character This was a remarkable read, and I found the only thing to be given that could take away from its greatness was its length. The story was quite long, and I was ready for the case to be solved 😅 However, no regrets reading the story! Fun read with great quotes, fun adventures, and spectacular moments! I’m sure I’ll return to Arsene Lupin’s adventures again!!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Manuela

    One of the best Lupin books, full of adventure and surprises.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Baron

    What a hoot. Sublimely ridiculous and revels in it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    Synopsis: when one of Lupin's victims is found dead and the wily criminal is implicated, he insists on heading the police search for the murderer. Synopsis: when one of Lupin's victims is found dead and the wily criminal is implicated, he insists on heading the police search for the murderer.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    I found this story very confusing. I don’t know if that’s because of the way it was written or because I started reading this series on book 4 rather than book 1. By the end I started to warm up to Lupin, but the other characters seemed flat and uninteresting. A fantastical story, Lupin’s exploits, and a plot twist at the end made the story somewhat interesting sometimes, but not interesting enough to get me to read more in this series.

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