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The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics, Vol. 3: Zombies

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From the banned 1950s horror comics that Dr. Fredric Wertham of the U.S. Senate and mothers didn't want innocent children to devour comes a terrifying and timely anthology of comics of the undead... Zombies. These gruesome mini-masterpieces are hauntingly delineated by some of the Golden Age's greatest artists: Jack Cole, Bob Powell, Howard Nostrand, Wally Wood, Gene Colan From the banned 1950s horror comics that Dr. Fredric Wertham of the U.S. Senate and mothers didn't want innocent children to devour comes a terrifying and timely anthology of comics of the undead... Zombies. These gruesome mini-masterpieces are hauntingly delineated by some of the Golden Age's greatest artists: Jack Cole, Bob Powell, Howard Nostrand, Wally Wood, Gene Colan, Lou Cameron, Reed Crandall, and others at their very best. The nightmarish scripts of the unstoppable living dead will make your spine freeze over in terror Edited and designed by Eisner winner Craig Yoe with an introduction by the host of the popular "The Horrors of It All" vintage comics blog, Steve "Karswell" Banes, Zombies follows in the footsteps of the "Dick Briefer's Frankenstein" and "Bob Powell's Terror" as the third not-to-be-missed book in The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics As with the entire line of Yoe Books, the reproduction techniques employed strive to preserve the look and feel of expensive vintage comics. Painstakingly remastered, enjoy the closest possible recreation of reading these comics when first released. For readers who enjoyed; THE WALKING DEAD VOLUME 1 9781582406725 MARVEL ZOMBIES 9780785122777 THE ZOMBIE SURVIVAL GUIDE: RECORDED ATTACKS 9780307405777 WORLD WAR ROBOT 9781600106491


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From the banned 1950s horror comics that Dr. Fredric Wertham of the U.S. Senate and mothers didn't want innocent children to devour comes a terrifying and timely anthology of comics of the undead... Zombies. These gruesome mini-masterpieces are hauntingly delineated by some of the Golden Age's greatest artists: Jack Cole, Bob Powell, Howard Nostrand, Wally Wood, Gene Colan From the banned 1950s horror comics that Dr. Fredric Wertham of the U.S. Senate and mothers didn't want innocent children to devour comes a terrifying and timely anthology of comics of the undead... Zombies. These gruesome mini-masterpieces are hauntingly delineated by some of the Golden Age's greatest artists: Jack Cole, Bob Powell, Howard Nostrand, Wally Wood, Gene Colan, Lou Cameron, Reed Crandall, and others at their very best. The nightmarish scripts of the unstoppable living dead will make your spine freeze over in terror Edited and designed by Eisner winner Craig Yoe with an introduction by the host of the popular "The Horrors of It All" vintage comics blog, Steve "Karswell" Banes, Zombies follows in the footsteps of the "Dick Briefer's Frankenstein" and "Bob Powell's Terror" as the third not-to-be-missed book in The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics As with the entire line of Yoe Books, the reproduction techniques employed strive to preserve the look and feel of expensive vintage comics. Painstakingly remastered, enjoy the closest possible recreation of reading these comics when first released. For readers who enjoyed; THE WALKING DEAD VOLUME 1 9781582406725 MARVEL ZOMBIES 9780785122777 THE ZOMBIE SURVIVAL GUIDE: RECORDED ATTACKS 9780307405777 WORLD WAR ROBOT 9781600106491

50 review for The Chilling Archives of Horror Comics, Vol. 3: Zombies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    As anyone following my reviews probably knows, I love horror comics. This is a collection of horror comics, mainly from the 50s, all with a theme of the undead. It's not all zombies as modern readers think of them, but basically anyone who returns from the dead. It's a pretty typical collection with mostly good art and stories that are hit and miss. They don't live up to the high standards of EC comics, but this is still an entertaining read. If you love 50s horror comic anthologies, you'll proba As anyone following my reviews probably knows, I love horror comics. This is a collection of horror comics, mainly from the 50s, all with a theme of the undead. It's not all zombies as modern readers think of them, but basically anyone who returns from the dead. It's a pretty typical collection with mostly good art and stories that are hit and miss. They don't live up to the high standards of EC comics, but this is still an entertaining read. If you love 50s horror comic anthologies, you'll probably enjoy this. It's not the cream of the crop, but still fun.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gonzalo Oyanedel

    El macabro encanto del cómic terrorífico anterior a los códigos de censura, donde la narración siniestra y el trazo efectista se entrelazan no pocas veces a la lección moral. Figuras seminales del relato gótico, los no muertos fueron también una figura central en la historieta de terror en los cincuenta gracias al talento de Frank Frazetta, Gene Colan, Basil Wolverton, Wally Wood y otros autores que merecen más reconocimiento; maestros de una escuela muy alabada, pero poco visitada.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Some of these stories are really good, some are really boring. But they all have zombies.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    A morbidly fun collection of pre-code zombie stories culled from Adventures Into The Unknown, Web of Evil, The Beyond, Dark Mysteries, Web of Mystery, Chamber of Chills, Black Cat, etc. The stories were scanned from the original comics without any digital restoration or re-coloring, which is my preference. I love the Marvel Masterworks, and the hardcover EC reprints, but the new vibrant colors do change the look and feel of those works. I also like the paper used for this collection as it's a hi A morbidly fun collection of pre-code zombie stories culled from Adventures Into The Unknown, Web of Evil, The Beyond, Dark Mysteries, Web of Mystery, Chamber of Chills, Black Cat, etc. The stories were scanned from the original comics without any digital restoration or re-coloring, which is my preference. I love the Marvel Masterworks, and the hardcover EC reprints, but the new vibrant colors do change the look and feel of those works. I also like the paper used for this collection as it's a higher quality than the cheap stock used for the originals, but it's non glossy, so it still retains the look of an older comic book. Here's some spoiler filled comments for my favorite stories. I Am a Zombie - An unscrupulous oil prospector is forced to drink a zombie makin' potion after playing hardball with some swamp folk. The best part is how he's given a new zombie name once he becomes one of the undead: no longer Roger Hanks- he is now...Morto! If There Will be Blood took place in a swamp, had zombies, and was 30 minutes long, it might have played out like this. The artwork by Lin Streeter is especially nice- he uses thick, bold lines and the composition in every panel is strong. The Corpse that Wouldn't Die - Jack Cole, undoubtedly the best artist in this collection, gives us a zombie that's a muscular Hulk-like monstrosity armed with a surgical saw. I've worked a lot of awful temp jobs in my life, but the fellow from the employment agency in this story has them beat, as he must translate a zombie killin' formula in ancient Sanskrit before the saw wielding corpse exacts it's revenge. Horror of Mixed Torsos - Another artistic standout is Dick Beck; his rendition of the main character, a lovelorn sad sack that works in a funeral home and is so ugly that flowers wilt in his presence, makes him almost sympathetic. The mix up of body parts that allows two murder victims to rise is so off the wall, I can't help but love it. The Zombie's Eyes - In addition to being a zombie story, you can also lump this one in the same genre where someone receives a transplant and begins to experience strange phenomena. A blinded plane crash survivor receives new eyes courtesy of a fellow passenger that happened to be a zombie. Unfortunately, he wants them back. What a long haired, robe wearing, walking corpse (Jesus cosplay? Polyphonic Spree member?) was doing on the plane is rather convoluted, but that's par the course with this loopy tale. I always get a kick out of seeing the undead engaged in fisticuffs, or screaming in pain in these older stories. The zombie in this story does both, and has the ability to fly. Will the beautiful crash survivor make a love connection with the handsome doctor that gave her zombie eyes, or will said zombie eyes first be plucked from her head by their original owner? Anything can happen in the crazy world of transplant surgery. Corpse that Wouldn't Sleep - A hardboiled detective yarn penciled by EC legend, Reed Crandall. My favorite thing might be the character descriptions on the first page. The widow, Linda Tarrent, is described as a woman "who went for any kind of men...except dead ones", which is to say she may not have high standards, but she draws the line at necrophilia. Conversely, her brother-in-law, Fred Tarrent, "shared his brother's estate, but not his taste in women". It may be that he doesn't like floozies, or it's just sour grapes coming from a probable virgin that has spent his life confined to a wheelchair making puppets. At any rate, he definitely has some issues since he makes a meat puppet out of his dead brother's body in order to torment Linda and her new boyfriend. Private Eye, Ken Shannon, theorizes that Fred was secretly in love with his brother's wife, giving the story a twist ending since Fred actually did share his brother's taste in women. Marching Zombies - This story is so confusing that I can barely make any sense out of it, but it does have a sacred pit of knives that a couple of guys get thrown into, so that balances things out. Actually, the pit is one of the more confusing points of the story. A bunch of zombies in an "obscure Asian desert" must shed the blood of a human in order to return to their burial mound as directed by their god, Kalu. So, they chuck an archeologist into the sacred pit of knives, who then crawls out of the pit as a newly minted zombie, much to the surprise of the other zombies. Kalu appears and is upset that his sacred pit of knives has been soiled by the archeologist and orders them to take him to their burial mound. They don't want their mound soiled anymore than Kalu wanted his pit soiled, and they refuse. As punishment for defying him, Kalu orders that a second archeologist be thrown into the sacred pit of knives!? The ways of Kalu are strange and mysterious.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    Interesting, eclectic collection of zombie-themed stories, though there's some looseness in the definition. Basically, any walking corpse story seems to count, and a couple involve either fake zombies or possibly a merely dreamed experience rather than the real thing. A few of the stories manage to be genuinely creepy, but most, as you might imagine, are pretty silly, and the art quality is variable. Many luminaries appear--Wood, Cole, Colan, Wolverton (on a cover image only) etc--but much of th Interesting, eclectic collection of zombie-themed stories, though there's some looseness in the definition. Basically, any walking corpse story seems to count, and a couple involve either fake zombies or possibly a merely dreamed experience rather than the real thing. A few of the stories manage to be genuinely creepy, but most, as you might imagine, are pretty silly, and the art quality is variable. Many luminaries appear--Wood, Cole, Colan, Wolverton (on a cover image only) etc--but much of the work, even by them, is undistinguished. And as is typical of Yoe books, the scanning is not exactly top-notch--no really bad pages, but some burriness, fuzziness, darkness etc. Entertaining but not a must-have, except for zombie maniacs.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    The third volume of Craig Yoe's Chilling Archives series focuses on the Zombies legend as rendered with drippy, ghouly and gruesome comic book style. All the pulpy horror comics greats are in the house: Wallace Wood, Reed Crandall, Jack Cole, Basil Wolverton, and a rogue's gallery too creepy and crawly to mention. Of the three volumes this is my least favorite as the stories tend to run into each other with similar plots, characters and climaxes. The best story is the Ken Shannon feature because The third volume of Craig Yoe's Chilling Archives series focuses on the Zombies legend as rendered with drippy, ghouly and gruesome comic book style. All the pulpy horror comics greats are in the house: Wallace Wood, Reed Crandall, Jack Cole, Basil Wolverton, and a rogue's gallery too creepy and crawly to mention. Of the three volumes this is my least favorite as the stories tend to run into each other with similar plots, characters and climaxes. The best story is the Ken Shannon feature because it adopts a Phillip Marlowe noir-style approach and even has a few hot redhead vixens to sex it up a little. If there was a little more sex in this "Living Dead" business then I'd probably pay more attention, hyuk.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Hartzer

    While I loved many of these stories in their original comic book format back in the day, all this book does is compile them into a couple dozen stories. I don't know exactly because there isn't even an index. Nor is there any appreciable original content. I love the genre, but this could have been so much better. While I loved many of these stories in their original comic book format back in the day, all this book does is compile them into a couple dozen stories. I don't know exactly because there isn't even an index. Nor is there any appreciable original content. I love the genre, but this could have been so much better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I wish I had a treehouse! Great book to read under the covers. It's nice to go back to the time when zombies weren't quite as vicious and obnoxious as they are now. Good old fashioned, cheesy, zombie stories in a great looking book. I even like the smell of it! I wish I had a treehouse! Great book to read under the covers. It's nice to go back to the time when zombies weren't quite as vicious and obnoxious as they are now. Good old fashioned, cheesy, zombie stories in a great looking book. I even like the smell of it!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bart Hill

    This is a fun collection of pre-code horror stories, specifically focusing on zombies. There are times when I wished the color reproductions were either sharper, or clearer, but perhaps this is the best that could be done, given the age and quality of the original stories from which to work.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    Pre-code horror stories. Often pretty gruesome.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Justin Blair

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Gosz-welch

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josh Burns

  14. 5 out of 5

    Moby-Nostromo

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

  16. 5 out of 5

    María

  17. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Piñeiro Carmona

  18. 5 out of 5

    Albert R.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Curry

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo Tello

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lacey

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  23. 5 out of 5

    Richard Humberstone

  24. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bob Bradshaw

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vivekanand Sridhar

  27. 4 out of 5

    Camhayden

  28. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  29. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  30. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Anderson

  31. 5 out of 5

    John Rovnak

  32. 5 out of 5

    Gene Kannenberg Jr

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Spaulding

  34. 5 out of 5

    Angelo

  35. 5 out of 5

    Steve Banes

  36. 4 out of 5

    Timo

  37. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  38. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Burr

  39. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

  40. 4 out of 5

    Patty

  41. 4 out of 5

    Man Solo

  42. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Lobato

  43. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  44. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina Morgan

  45. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  46. 5 out of 5

    Grayson

  47. 4 out of 5

    wenchiebrat

  48. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  49. 4 out of 5

    Kaci

  50. 5 out of 5

    Steve

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