Hot Best Seller

postChristian: What's Left? Can We Fix It? Do We Care?

Availability: Ready to download

It's the end of Christianity as we know it. But it's not a catastrophe-it's an opportunity. Thousands are walking away from the church. Christians are grappling with their faith. And both believers and nonbelievers wondering-what's coming next? Fearless and provocative, spiritual trailblazer Christian Piatt offers a roadmap to the future of faith with an unflinching examina It's the end of Christianity as we know it. But it's not a catastrophe-it's an opportunity. Thousands are walking away from the church. Christians are grappling with their faith. And both believers and nonbelievers wondering-what's coming next? Fearless and provocative, spiritual trailblazer Christian Piatt offers a roadmap to the future of faith with an unflinching examination of the church today. What's left? Pairing the best "virtues" and worst "scandals" of Christianity, Piatt invites us to abandon institutional religion for deeper, truer faith. Can we fix it? Guided by the biggest historical, religious, and pop-cultural pioneers of the post Christian era, he demonstrates how to save the best of what Christianity has to offer-and how to rediscover and reinvent the rest. Do we care? There's plenty of good left in Christianity-if we dare to be as scandalously graceful and loving as Jesus Himself. Bold and insightful, Postchristian dares Christians to break out of the box and invites outsiders into the fold as we revolutionize faith for a postmodern world.


Compare

It's the end of Christianity as we know it. But it's not a catastrophe-it's an opportunity. Thousands are walking away from the church. Christians are grappling with their faith. And both believers and nonbelievers wondering-what's coming next? Fearless and provocative, spiritual trailblazer Christian Piatt offers a roadmap to the future of faith with an unflinching examina It's the end of Christianity as we know it. But it's not a catastrophe-it's an opportunity. Thousands are walking away from the church. Christians are grappling with their faith. And both believers and nonbelievers wondering-what's coming next? Fearless and provocative, spiritual trailblazer Christian Piatt offers a roadmap to the future of faith with an unflinching examination of the church today. What's left? Pairing the best "virtues" and worst "scandals" of Christianity, Piatt invites us to abandon institutional religion for deeper, truer faith. Can we fix it? Guided by the biggest historical, religious, and pop-cultural pioneers of the post Christian era, he demonstrates how to save the best of what Christianity has to offer-and how to rediscover and reinvent the rest. Do we care? There's plenty of good left in Christianity-if we dare to be as scandalously graceful and loving as Jesus Himself. Bold and insightful, Postchristian dares Christians to break out of the box and invites outsiders into the fold as we revolutionize faith for a postmodern world.

58 review for postChristian: What's Left? Can We Fix It? Do We Care?

  1. 4 out of 5

    Robert D. Cornwall

    I've long enjoyed the writings and contributions of Christian Piatt. That continues to be true with his latest book Post Christian. While the title speaks of being post-Christian, it might be better to say that we have moved into a post-Christendom age, but as Christian Piatt reminds us -- often they are equated. The cultural nature of Christendom, which has been in place since Constantine decided to embrace Christianity as a religious glue to hold his empire together is collapsing. The question I've long enjoyed the writings and contributions of Christian Piatt. That continues to be true with his latest book Post Christian. While the title speaks of being post-Christian, it might be better to say that we have moved into a post-Christendom age, but as Christian Piatt reminds us -- often they are equated. The cultural nature of Christendom, which has been in place since Constantine decided to embrace Christianity as a religious glue to hold his empire together is collapsing. The question that Christian poses concerns whether there is something present in Christianity, as we now have it, sans the long-standing cultural supports, that can be fixed or sustained, and do we care. As a pastor, I do care. I do believe that there is something valuable embeddded in the Christian faith -- in the gospel of Jesus -- that can be discovered and released. Late in the book, Christian brings into plane the image of the "Refiner's Fire." While he had grown up with the idea that this fire separated believer from non-believer, what it really involves is burning away the dross that has latched on to the gospel, but when removed -- refined -- reveals something transformative. At the heart of the book is the contrast between seven scandals and seven virtues. These are alternated through the course of the book. The scandals are: pride, certainty, lust, greed, judgment, fear and envy. Contrasting with these seven chapters are seven others lifting up hmility, faith, love, charity, mercy, courage and justice. While I found some areas of concern, including the possibility of supersessionism creeping in as he outlined his vision of a progressive development of the biblical story, so that the Gospel seems, at times, to be placed as superior to the Old Testament. For my part, having been sensitized to such things, can we not understand Jesus to be in a stream of Jewish interpretation that originates in the Hebrew Bible, and is expressed as well here. With those caveats and a few others, I think this is an excellent exploration of the place that Christianity finds itself today. The old ways are not resonating. Christian has a good grasp on the emerging movements. He's provocative in some ways, pushing boundaries, but he also cares about the message of Jesus. So, take and read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Rodriguez

    PostChristian seeks to be fringy in what turned out to be an unthoughtful collection of mostly unfounded arguments against a side of Christianity he never defines well. Does he seek to rebuke fundamentalists? Evangelicals? Catholics? I am not sure. Throughout the book, you will learn that Jesus had racist tendencies as a "man of his times," God isn't sufficient for our joy, truth is found only in loving relationships rather than in the Bible, and that the Bible can't be applied to others because PostChristian seeks to be fringy in what turned out to be an unthoughtful collection of mostly unfounded arguments against a side of Christianity he never defines well. Does he seek to rebuke fundamentalists? Evangelicals? Catholics? I am not sure. Throughout the book, you will learn that Jesus had racist tendencies as a "man of his times," God isn't sufficient for our joy, truth is found only in loving relationships rather than in the Bible, and that the Bible can't be applied to others because they might interpret it differently. In the end, the only way to conquer post-Christianity is to become post-Christian, to give up the doctrines that Christianity has held for millennia. Sure, the Church has committed sin in the past and sin must be rebuked. Sure, it may be time to update our methodologies without neglecting our beliefs. But to allow our culture to define Christianity makes Christianity vanity. The Bible is clear. The Bible is persuasive. And the Bible has the answers for a post-Christian nation. Yet, the author quotes from psychologists, philosophers, and the New York Times countless times more than he uses the Bible, and when he does, he uses the Bible fallaciously. Maybe the author was hurt by a hypocrites who spoke the truth without compassion. However, the solution to this predicament is to temper truth with love, not to remove the truth in place for subjective desire! In addition, although I disagree with the author on a great majority of his tenets, I find it almost as baffling that he seeks to persuade those like me to love more with the decidedly mean tone he uses throughout the book. As if those in Christianity he disagrees with are idiots, bound in their ways, never to change, and destined to fail. If you hold to Biblical truth, this book is not for you. If you wish to merge Christianity and culture, read on.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jayson Bradley

    In Christian Piatt's postChristian, we're confronted with the theological and social distinctives creating a PR nightmare for the church. As the number of people who claim no religious association grows, we have to question where we're miscommunicating the gospel with the culture at large. Piatt doesn't mince words or pull punches as he deftly identifies ways the church is turning people off of with the good news. What I loved about postChristian was the tightrope Piatt walked between pointing ou In Christian Piatt's postChristian, we're confronted with the theological and social distinctives creating a PR nightmare for the church. As the number of people who claim no religious association grows, we have to question where we're miscommunicating the gospel with the culture at large. Piatt doesn't mince words or pull punches as he deftly identifies ways the church is turning people off of with the good news. What I loved about postChristian was the tightrope Piatt walked between pointing out the church's faults while elevating the gospel's beauty. Like a civil war-era surgeon, Piatt places a bit of leather in the church's mouth and proceeds to cut away the offending gangrenous flesh, it might be an uncomfortable, or downright painful, process, but you can tell he does it because he genuinely cares about the health of the patient. Deep and profound, this is a must read for anyone who cares about the gospel and wonders why it seems to be losing cultural traction.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tim Newell

    Meh. After many years I'm now in the "do not care" category... about Christianity and about this book. Meh. After many years I'm now in the "do not care" category... about Christianity and about this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jason Frazier

    A tired droning of one of way too many books following the thesis of “All the things wrong with Christianity.” The problem isn’t Christianity; the problems are: nominal Christians, Christians with über-liberal theologies, Christians who hold extreme views on theological issues, and several other things. Piatt’s book is coherent, but is an unnecessary addition to the already unnecessary writings of Brian McLaren, Pete Rollins, and others.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter Perry

    Nothing too new and challenging here. I wearied of the chapters but felt the final chapter was inspirational and pulled it all together well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Linda Brendle

    Christian Piatt describes himself as an author, speaker, antagonist, and God nerd. postChristian is an in-depth look into the decline of institutional religion and what might lie ahead for Christianity. Structured in a problem/solution format, the book offers alternating chapters featuring Christian scandals, loosely based on the “seven deadly sins,” followed by Christ-like virtues. The author writes in a way that at times made me want to sit back and say “Word” – which I think is the current eq Christian Piatt describes himself as an author, speaker, antagonist, and God nerd. postChristian is an in-depth look into the decline of institutional religion and what might lie ahead for Christianity. Structured in a problem/solution format, the book offers alternating chapters featuring Christian scandals, loosely based on the “seven deadly sins,” followed by Christ-like virtues. The author writes in a way that at times made me want to sit back and say “Word” – which I think is the current equivalent to “Right on, man” - while at other times I scratched my head and thought, now what exactly did he mean by that? His scholarly citations sometimes challenged my lazy intellectualism, but his conversational style, contemporary references, and personal stories clarified his point and answered many questions. I didn’t agree with everything he wrote. Christian Piatt is my son, and he and I don’t always see eye to eye, especially when it comes to theology. However, I don’t believe the point of this book is to try and win people over to a certain point of view. Piatt is simply pointing out what he sees as possibly fatal flaws in the existing religious establishments, suggesting what he sees as some possible solutions, and encouraging the reader to set out on his or her own journey of spiritual discovery. When I first began reading Christian’s book, I made notes – lots of notes – about things I agreed with, things I disagreed with, and questions I had. Then, when I sat down to write this review, I struggled with how to condense what I felt about the book into a readable length. As often happens in this tech-savvy world, I found the answer on Facebook. Christian has been on a speaking and promotional tour for postChristian, and he recently posted a comment from someone in one of his audiences. "You made me uncomfortable, restless and even kinda itchy. And I needed it" When you read postChristian, you may nod your head in agreement, or you may pound the arm of your chair in disagreement, but you won’t be neutral. It will make you restlessly consider what it is you really believe, and hopefully it will make you “kinda itchy” to find out why you really believe it. We all need that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott Haraburda

    Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ PostChristian: What's Left? Can We Fix It? Do We Care? This is an unorthodox book about Christianity and its churches today that claim to know what it means to be a Christian. Filled with relevant personal stories, the author plants several seeds that challenges our current beliefs about Christ and what we should do as His follower, an interesting version of WWJD (What Would Jesus Do). Many times we try to answer WWJD by list Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ PostChristian: What's Left? Can We Fix It? Do We Care? This is an unorthodox book about Christianity and its churches today that claim to know what it means to be a Christian. Filled with relevant personal stories, the author plants several seeds that challenges our current beliefs about Christ and what we should do as His follower, an interesting version of WWJD (What Would Jesus Do). Many times we try to answer WWJD by listening to Christian experts, the ones occupying the pulpits; but, many times their messages seem to contradict the words found in the Gospels that describe His life. Even Jesus found that the experts during his life on Earth were the priests and Levites who preferred the literal words of the Jewish laws over that of caring for the needs of others, especially those of ill-repute, such as prostitutes, tax collectors, and other contemptable people. Perhaps, it was because Jesus placed the needs of others ahead of His own, as He wasn’t judgmental and definitely wasn’t hypocritical. It was clear, that this author believes that Christianity isn’t about the rules but about the relationship we have with Jesus. Christian Piatt is the author of several books in the areas of Christian faith, culture, and young adult spirituality. He also created the Banned Questions books, such as the 2011 Banned Questions about the Bible. It was refreshing to hear young adults question the current religious dogmas, something that another young adult, Jesus, did Himself with the Jewish religion two millennia ago. Post Christian is a book that all Christians should not only add to their library, but also read. There are important messages within it that we all should understand.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lee Harmon

    I’m a fan of Piatt’s books, and once again he doesn’t disappoint. I’ve reviewed a couple of books in his Banned Questions series on The Dubious Disciple, and they too are very good. This time around, Piatt writes more personally about his past experiences and his vision for the way forward. Christianity has failed Piatt in a number of ways, but he clings to his hope for better times, redefining God (who is not a being to be named, but rather an “event” to be experienced) and looking back to Jesus I’m a fan of Piatt’s books, and once again he doesn’t disappoint. I’ve reviewed a couple of books in his Banned Questions series on The Dubious Disciple, and they too are very good. This time around, Piatt writes more personally about his past experiences and his vision for the way forward. Christianity has failed Piatt in a number of ways, but he clings to his hope for better times, redefining God (who is not a being to be named, but rather an “event” to be experienced) and looking back to Jesus for his example. He nails the spirit and teachings of Jesus as he discusses topics from neighbor envy to perfect joy. Piatt wants us to spit out the poison and examine Jesus’ example in search of a hungrier love. In Jesus’ day, the Jews longed for a conqueror to ride in, kick ass, and take names, but instead the Messiah arrived as a Suffering Servant. A new way of thinking. But have we made any progress toward Jesus’ vision? Today, Christianity has become so inured to the values and effects of capitalism within our religious institutions that we’re effectively blind to its presence. What happened to Jesus and his dream of God’s kingdom coming to earth? What’s left of our church? Can we fix it? Do we care? Piatt admires the church of a friend, where Republicans sit next to bleeding heart former hippies, skeptical intellectuals, and folks who have no idea what they believe, but who find they all fit together in some strangely beautiful way. They need and love one another. That, says Piatt, is a glimpse of the kingdom of God. Moving, articulate and to the point, this is a book all Christians should read. Jericho Books, © 2014, 214 pages ISBN: 978-1-4555-7311-0

  10. 5 out of 5

    Seth Pierce

    I expected this book to be akin to Millennials, or You Lost Me--providing an analysis of current cultural trends and how Christianity might adapt to meet its needs. Instead the majority of this book is an ill-researched postmodern rant (and not even good postmodern rant) with much of the content available on any disgruntled Facebook/Youtube message board. The patristics are horrible, the medieval church stuff merely okay, and the vague view of biblical inspiration constantly leaves you wondering I expected this book to be akin to Millennials, or You Lost Me--providing an analysis of current cultural trends and how Christianity might adapt to meet its needs. Instead the majority of this book is an ill-researched postmodern rant (and not even good postmodern rant) with much of the content available on any disgruntled Facebook/Youtube message board. The patristics are horrible, the medieval church stuff merely okay, and the vague view of biblical inspiration constantly leaves you wondering how the author views scripture--or how we should view it. At times it seems to carry authority, and at others its simply a bunch of nationalistic Jews writing what they want God to be like. The hermeneutics are horrible. I almost gave up on this, but the author does shine when dealing with the subject of biblical justice and its implications. He does write off any sort of atonement that has Jesus dying for sin--saying that He had to die because it was inevitable that we would kill him. The author quotes his wife several times, and she is very insightful--maybe she should have written the book. The book does provide a perspective, albeit one that borders on a poor caricature, of postmodern thought. The book is tolerable at 3/4 of the way through, which is where Piatt really does have some goo things to offer, its just a shame it surrounded by a bunch of other nonsense that feels like scraps edited out of a Rob Bell book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Received this through GoodReads First Reads Giveaway. This is a rather interesting story about how not only how he viewed Christianity, especially for how he believes, but how in many ways, more than Christians want to admit, Christianity has not changed, but the interpretation changed. I found it fascinating not only how he adapted to his interpretation, but also how he had to change himself. He makes many good points about how Christians "talk" about Jesus and their faith, but not follow throug Received this through GoodReads First Reads Giveaway. This is a rather interesting story about how not only how he viewed Christianity, especially for how he believes, but how in many ways, more than Christians want to admit, Christianity has not changed, but the interpretation changed. I found it fascinating not only how he adapted to his interpretation, but also how he had to change himself. He makes many good points about how Christians "talk" about Jesus and their faith, but not follow through with their actions. His findings and writing brings so much truth and helps bring those who are questioning help bring their faith into these hard times in which Christianity is coming under such scrutiny. For me who is fascinated, but also questioning to some degree, found this quite helpful and found that it's almost like you are having a one-on-one conversation with him. Especially about how I too had lots of fear on things instead of enjoying life. While this is good, I found it difficult at times to get past as it was a bit too dry for my tastes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pancho Pickett

    The title is a bit misleading, but the author takes the Christian Church and dissects it down to its core components both good and bad. The author makes a compelling critique of institutional Christianity, both orthodox and Protestant veins, and makes a call for progressivism in Christians' attitudes and a change in the way we value institutional Christianity. A fantastic read for those are uneasy with how Christianity is handling today's social justice issues yet still feel a desire to uphold b The title is a bit misleading, but the author takes the Christian Church and dissects it down to its core components both good and bad. The author makes a compelling critique of institutional Christianity, both orthodox and Protestant veins, and makes a call for progressivism in Christians' attitudes and a change in the way we value institutional Christianity. A fantastic read for those are uneasy with how Christianity is handling today's social justice issues yet still feel a desire to uphold basic Christian tenets.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Ackerman

    In his introduction to “Post-Christian: What’s Left? Can We Fix It? Do We Care?” Christian Piatt says, “This book will piss you off.” Truly, I was less pissed off by the book than I am by the circumstances that necessitate it. I recently began serving as a “judicatory leader,” and my feelings are still raw from sitting in a recent meeting where a congregation voted to close its doors. And this is only one of many that are closing at a far too rapid pace. It breaks my heart to witness this fall o In his introduction to “Post-Christian: What’s Left? Can We Fix It? Do We Care?” Christian Piatt says, “This book will piss you off.” Truly, I was less pissed off by the book than I am by the circumstances that necessitate it. I recently began serving as a “judicatory leader,” and my feelings are still raw from sitting in a recent meeting where a congregation voted to close its doors. And this is only one of many that are closing at a far too rapid pace. It breaks my heart to witness this fall of the institutional church as we once knew it. But Piatt calls our attention to a reality beyond institutional maintenance. He calls us to a radical reclamation of the Gospel message for our time. He promises no crystal ball into the future but instead offers an invitation to journey ahead together. Anyone with an interest in Christian faith today will benefit from reading this book and taking Piatt up on his invitation.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shane Galloway

    I loved that postChristian had thoughtful criticism to offer to both evangelicals and progressives but that Christian Piatt wasn't satisfied to offer only criticism but balanced every critical chapter with a chapter of hope and ways to move forward. I hope that conservatives and liberals alike read this, take to heart the criticism, and take Christian's encouragements as seeds to think creatively about how to share Christ alive with people who are tired of our dead programs and self-serving fait I loved that postChristian had thoughtful criticism to offer to both evangelicals and progressives but that Christian Piatt wasn't satisfied to offer only criticism but balanced every critical chapter with a chapter of hope and ways to move forward. I hope that conservatives and liberals alike read this, take to heart the criticism, and take Christian's encouragements as seeds to think creatively about how to share Christ alive with people who are tired of our dead programs and self-serving faith. I had the opportunity to hear Christian speak about the book and was thrilled that his passion matches his intelligence. If you can get him to speak I highly recommend that you do so.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Just another screed of complaints. No solutions provided and honestly I wouldn't even call what the author professes any sort of Christianity. I felt like he asks you to abdicate your brain and common sense for feelings. The abdication of thinking is what has caused a lot of problems in the Christian Church today. That and personality cults and pastor worship and bad leadership. Just another screed of complaints. No solutions provided and honestly I wouldn't even call what the author professes any sort of Christianity. I felt like he asks you to abdicate your brain and common sense for feelings. The abdication of thinking is what has caused a lot of problems in the Christian Church today. That and personality cults and pastor worship and bad leadership.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    Some very helpful insights. Thoughtful.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mariana Farcas

    A book that makes you questions the traditional Christian interpretations of the religious leaders and society.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Pearson

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Borthwick

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Harts

  21. 4 out of 5

    J. Kingrea

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bjarte

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Renfro

  24. 5 out of 5

    LJ

  25. 5 out of 5

    C

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Carpenter

  27. 4 out of 5

    Antoine Tremblay

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Garay

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Grant

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate Ditzler

  31. 5 out of 5

    Ted Morgan

  32. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sheryl

  34. 4 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  35. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  36. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  37. 5 out of 5

    Diane Driscoll

  38. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Weber

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  40. 5 out of 5

    Darlene

  41. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  42. 5 out of 5

    Alaina Maxam

  43. 4 out of 5

    Brit Thorton

  44. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  45. 4 out of 5

    James

  46. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  47. 5 out of 5

    Kristi Richardson

  48. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Crowe

  49. 5 out of 5

    Brittney

  50. 5 out of 5

    Kim Hathorn

  51. 5 out of 5

    Scott Stewart

  52. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  53. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  54. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

  55. 4 out of 5

    Wendi Dusek

  56. 4 out of 5

    K.

  57. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

  58. 5 out of 5

    Raymond Stone

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...