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The Bronze Age of DC Comics

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Comics grow up.  The humanized super hero On December 15, 1978, the dreams of generations of American children finally came true. “You’ll believe a man can fly," read the posters and billboards for the blockbuster film Superman . With an undeniable mass appeal, it cemented the role of the super hero as America’s most enduring archetype, and the comic book as one of the Comics grow up.  The humanized super hero On December 15, 1978, the dreams of generations of American children finally came true. “You’ll believe a man can fly," read the posters and billboards for the blockbuster film Superman . With an undeniable mass appeal, it cemented the role of the super hero as America’s most enduring archetype, and the comic book as one of the country’s most significant native art forms. That art form, however, was already moving in a new direction. Influenced by the emergence of underground comics and shifting political tides, DC's line of comics was increasingly aimed at adults, and sold in comic book shops, rather than on newsstands. Socially relevant subjects such as drug addiction, racism, and women’s rights had entered the mainstream, and comics weren’t just for kids anymore. The Bronze Age of DC Comics includes an original interview with Green Lantern/Green Arrow writer Denny O’Neil. About the series: TASCHEN’s series on DC Comics explores the origins of comics’ most enduring legends and the behind-the-scenes stories of the men and women who created them, era by era. Expanded from the Eisner Award–winning XL book, 75 Years of DC Comics, this new series hits the shelf at a reader-friendly size with essays updated by author Paul Levitz and more than 1,000 new images across five volumes. Thousands of covers and interiors, original illustrations, photographs, film stills, and collectibles have been reproduced to bring the story lines, the characters, and their creators to vibrant life, making this an invaluable reference for comics fans. DC Comics characters and all related elements are trademarks of and © DC Comics. (s13)


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Comics grow up.  The humanized super hero On December 15, 1978, the dreams of generations of American children finally came true. “You’ll believe a man can fly," read the posters and billboards for the blockbuster film Superman . With an undeniable mass appeal, it cemented the role of the super hero as America’s most enduring archetype, and the comic book as one of the Comics grow up.  The humanized super hero On December 15, 1978, the dreams of generations of American children finally came true. “You’ll believe a man can fly," read the posters and billboards for the blockbuster film Superman . With an undeniable mass appeal, it cemented the role of the super hero as America’s most enduring archetype, and the comic book as one of the country’s most significant native art forms. That art form, however, was already moving in a new direction. Influenced by the emergence of underground comics and shifting political tides, DC's line of comics was increasingly aimed at adults, and sold in comic book shops, rather than on newsstands. Socially relevant subjects such as drug addiction, racism, and women’s rights had entered the mainstream, and comics weren’t just for kids anymore. The Bronze Age of DC Comics includes an original interview with Green Lantern/Green Arrow writer Denny O’Neil. About the series: TASCHEN’s series on DC Comics explores the origins of comics’ most enduring legends and the behind-the-scenes stories of the men and women who created them, era by era. Expanded from the Eisner Award–winning XL book, 75 Years of DC Comics, this new series hits the shelf at a reader-friendly size with essays updated by author Paul Levitz and more than 1,000 new images across five volumes. Thousands of covers and interiors, original illustrations, photographs, film stills, and collectibles have been reproduced to bring the story lines, the characters, and their creators to vibrant life, making this an invaluable reference for comics fans. DC Comics characters and all related elements are trademarks of and © DC Comics. (s13)

30 review for The Bronze Age of DC Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lightwhisper

    Um livro gigante com as principais capas de histórias da DC da idade do bronze. Muitas descrições que desconhecia e seguem-me por autores também. No entanto, a mim sabe-me a pouco e por isso é que só leva 4 estrelas.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Richard Guion

    This is the book for the DC Comics fan who loved the comics from the 1970s & early 80s! Great behind the scenes stories & the reproduction of the artwork is incredible.

  3. 5 out of 5

    scrbl

    When I first saw the book in the bookstore it had “the best gift for comics fans” written on it. Indeed, it is. Seeing the evolution of DC comics throughout the Bronze Age so well presented was a delightful experience.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This is more a pictorial history of DC in the Bronze Age than a true reference book, but it is a wonderful look back at covers, stories, and production of that ear's comics. Lots of new stuff here I had never seen before (I never knew there was a Batman story that riffed on the "Paul is dead" Beatles rumors) and lots of stuff fondly remembered. Levitz's layout is kinda strange at times and I noticed an entry missing , but that is minor. This book, along with companions for the Gold and silver age This is more a pictorial history of DC in the Bronze Age than a true reference book, but it is a wonderful look back at covers, stories, and production of that ear's comics. Lots of new stuff here I had never seen before (I never knew there was a Batman story that riffed on the "Paul is dead" Beatles rumors) and lots of stuff fondly remembered. Levitz's layout is kinda strange at times and I noticed an entry missing , but that is minor. This book, along with companions for the Gold and silver ages, are expanded from those sections of his monumental DC book. A forthcoming Modern Age book covering the mid-80s to now has been canceled, alas.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark Short

    A great end to the series. Highly recommended.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Thorner

    If you are a fan of the Bronze Age, you have the space, and you can afford the price (I got mine at a nice discount and am niche market), this is essential. Paul Levitz underplays his own contribution to this period, which would be my only quibble.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bobb Waller

  8. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Alderdice

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  11. 4 out of 5

    Doyle

    This volume wasn't as fun or informative as the previous two volumes. This volume wasn't as fun or informative as the previous two volumes.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Kirksey

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen Lynn

  14. 5 out of 5

    sharne mehmet

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eme A

    Tercer tocho del mismo autor de la historia de DC (aunque en realidad estos libros son simplemente la ampliación troceada de un volumen anterior). Es un libro muy visual, lleno de ilustraciones y portadas a gran tamaño, y (huelga decirlo) está escrito desde un punto de vista muy favorable a la editorial, rememorando los aciertos y pasando de puntillas por lo malo. Pese a ello, magnífico

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michiel Offerman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Tyzzer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

  19. 5 out of 5

    TYLER QXBEAR

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Manley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brady

  22. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jay Kulpa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Victor

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bertrand LE

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sticks Phillips

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tim Schneider

  28. 5 out of 5

    -

  29. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  30. 5 out of 5

    ora

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