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1914: Poetry Remembers

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The First World War holds a unique place in the nation's history; the poetry it produced, a unique place in the nation's hearts. To mark the centenary of the First World War in 2014, the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, has engaged the most eminent poets of the present to choose the writing from the Great War that touched them most profoundly: their choices are here in this The First World War holds a unique place in the nation's history; the poetry it produced, a unique place in the nation's hearts. To mark the centenary of the First World War in 2014, the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, has engaged the most eminent poets of the present to choose the writing from the Great War that touched them most profoundly: their choices are here in this powerful and moving assembly. But this anthology is more than a record of war writing. Carol Ann Duffy has commissioned these same poets of the present to look back across the past and write a poem of their own in response to the war to end all wars. Whether as a reader your interest is in the Great War or the great war poets, or whether it is in the poetry of today, this anthology will hold a special place in your affections, as it remembers and recalls - a and through its commissioned work, renews and honours - the engagement between poetry and this terrible, unworldly of world conflicts.


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The First World War holds a unique place in the nation's history; the poetry it produced, a unique place in the nation's hearts. To mark the centenary of the First World War in 2014, the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, has engaged the most eminent poets of the present to choose the writing from the Great War that touched them most profoundly: their choices are here in this The First World War holds a unique place in the nation's history; the poetry it produced, a unique place in the nation's hearts. To mark the centenary of the First World War in 2014, the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, has engaged the most eminent poets of the present to choose the writing from the Great War that touched them most profoundly: their choices are here in this powerful and moving assembly. But this anthology is more than a record of war writing. Carol Ann Duffy has commissioned these same poets of the present to look back across the past and write a poem of their own in response to the war to end all wars. Whether as a reader your interest is in the Great War or the great war poets, or whether it is in the poetry of today, this anthology will hold a special place in your affections, as it remembers and recalls - a and through its commissioned work, renews and honours - the engagement between poetry and this terrible, unworldly of world conflicts.

30 review for 1914: Poetry Remembers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    I am no judge of technical merit, but the war poets' emotional power is overwhelming. They capture the humanity, the suffering of something so large and impersonal and lethal. I am no judge of technical merit, but the war poets' emotional power is overwhelming. They capture the humanity, the suffering of something so large and impersonal and lethal.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cerys

    I am not a massive poetry lover, however, the work of Carol Ann Duffy and many poems surrounding the themes of war have stuck with me the most which are why I picked up this anthology. The collections of poems is not only the selection of many modern well-known poets favourite poems surrounding the years of the first world war but also poems that they had written in Memorium to the wars that have befallen this planet. This doesn't only feature the works of well known WW1 English poets it also fe I am not a massive poetry lover, however, the work of Carol Ann Duffy and many poems surrounding the themes of war have stuck with me the most which are why I picked up this anthology. The collections of poems is not only the selection of many modern well-known poets favourite poems surrounding the years of the first world war but also poems that they had written in Memorium to the wars that have befallen this planet. This doesn't only feature the works of well known WW1 English poets it also features many translated poems from across the globe including Indian, French and Austrian poets alike. As well as this the collection looks at the themes of war from a multitude of different perspectives including those in the throws of war, those at home, mothers and children. This anthology covers all basis' and it was a painful yet enjoyable experience to read. I would highly recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    This anthology is full of tender poetry. If you get the chance to pick it up in a bookstore the least you can do is read ‘Recruiting’ by Ewart Alan Mackintosh, ‘Ballad of the three spectres’ by Ivor Gurney, or...you know what, just do yourself a favour and go read some war poetry.

  4. 5 out of 5

    T P Kennedy

    It's a superb little anthology - made all the richer by the inclusion of Seamus Heaney's last published poem. The concept of inviting a range of modern poets to contribute a piece and then select a companion piece from poetry and other writings of the time. The poems vary from the seeming simplicity of Heaney to the thought provocation from Paul Muldoon to the classical allusions of Michael Longley. There's a very Irish orientation to this book. Mind you, it's hard to top "Last Post" by Duffy he It's a superb little anthology - made all the richer by the inclusion of Seamus Heaney's last published poem. The concept of inviting a range of modern poets to contribute a piece and then select a companion piece from poetry and other writings of the time. The poems vary from the seeming simplicity of Heaney to the thought provocation from Paul Muldoon to the classical allusions of Michael Longley. There's a very Irish orientation to this book. Mind you, it's hard to top "Last Post" by Duffy herself. This retelling of the war backwards where soldiers become civilians again and return to their families is very powerful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Edited by Carol Ann Duffy a diverse selection of poets, including the late Seamus Heany, were asked to select a work by a poet from the First World War and write a poem of their own in response. In many ways the voices from the past overwhelm the modern poems and particularly powerful were short prose pieces by Saki (Hector Hugh Munro) and John McCauley. Of the new poems Blake Morrison's, Daljit Nagra's, Vicki Feaver's and Grace Nichols's pieces stick in my mind. There is a nicely chosen order t Edited by Carol Ann Duffy a diverse selection of poets, including the late Seamus Heany, were asked to select a work by a poet from the First World War and write a poem of their own in response. In many ways the voices from the past overwhelm the modern poems and particularly powerful were short prose pieces by Saki (Hector Hugh Munro) and John McCauley. Of the new poems Blake Morrison's, Daljit Nagra's, Vicki Feaver's and Grace Nichols's pieces stick in my mind. There is a nicely chosen order to the works too and the whole thing is bookended with poems by Carol Ann Duffy herself. Well done all concerned.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Interesting collection of original First World War poems and modern poems reflecting responses to the poetry, poets, and the First World War itself. Bought it as a Kindle book to read while traveling the battlefields of Belgium and France and it offered some interesting insights. Certainly doesn't replace collections like those offered by Penguin or Oxford and not sure I would appreciate this collection as well in a paper format but it was a nice addition. Interesting collection of original First World War poems and modern poems reflecting responses to the poetry, poets, and the First World War itself. Bought it as a Kindle book to read while traveling the battlefields of Belgium and France and it offered some interesting insights. Certainly doesn't replace collections like those offered by Penguin or Oxford and not sure I would appreciate this collection as well in a paper format but it was a nice addition.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I must admit that poetry is not one of my favourite genres and I wouldn't have read it if it hadn't been our BookChat Group read for the month. There are some poems that I do like but, unfortunately, I found none in this collection; there was nothing that gave me any sort of 'wow' factor so I was totally underwhelmed I'm afraid. I must admit that poetry is not one of my favourite genres and I wouldn't have read it if it hadn't been our BookChat Group read for the month. There are some poems that I do like but, unfortunately, I found none in this collection; there was nothing that gave me any sort of 'wow' factor so I was totally underwhelmed I'm afraid.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Liza

    The poems of the contemporary poets weren't entirely consistent in strength, and it's a pity not all of them were about WWI. However, the chosen poetry and other written statements by the boys in the trenches are very strong. The collection ends on a very high note, with 'Last Post' by Carol Ann Duffy, "If poetry could truly tell it backwards, then it would." The poems of the contemporary poets weren't entirely consistent in strength, and it's a pity not all of them were about WWI. However, the chosen poetry and other written statements by the boys in the trenches are very strong. The collection ends on a very high note, with 'Last Post' by Carol Ann Duffy, "If poetry could truly tell it backwards, then it would."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jo Morris

    Another of Duffy's compilations/anthologies, where she asks current poets to respond, poetically, to themed poems - in this case, the poetry of WW1. As usual, varying quality - but I found this volume among the more successful. I particularly liked Imteaz Dharker's response to Wilfred Owen's 'Anthem for Doomed Youth', entitled 'A century later', and the inclusion of female voices from the war. Another of Duffy's compilations/anthologies, where she asks current poets to respond, poetically, to themed poems - in this case, the poetry of WW1. As usual, varying quality - but I found this volume among the more successful. I particularly liked Imteaz Dharker's response to Wilfred Owen's 'Anthem for Doomed Youth', entitled 'A century later', and the inclusion of female voices from the war.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emylie

    I had to read in bits because some of the poems required time to process them emotionally.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    A tremendous anthology. I had to take it in small bits though - the emotion is overwhelming.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Well-chosen Poetry which evokes the deep and raw trauma of industrialized war. An emotive portal to an age of bitter loss. Poetry helps us to understand it. Highly recommended.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Webster

  15. 4 out of 5

    J Partridge

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rindel

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josephine Linnane

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tilly Adeborn Fortea

  19. 5 out of 5

    Haley Renee The Caffeinated Reader

  20. 5 out of 5

    N.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bethan Archer

  22. 5 out of 5

    Janay Brazier

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  24. 5 out of 5

    Svenja

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne Kelly

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Mae Taylor

  28. 5 out of 5

    John

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark Hebden

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tom

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