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Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days

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Writers flock to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) each November because it provides a procrastination-busting deadline. But only a fraction of the participants meet their goal. Denise Jaden was part of that fraction, writing first drafts of her two published young adult novels during NaNoWriMo. In Fast Fiction, she shows other writers how to do what she did, step-b Writers flock to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) each November because it provides a procrastination-busting deadline. But only a fraction of the participants meet their goal. Denise Jaden was part of that fraction, writing first drafts of her two published young adult novels during NaNoWriMo. In Fast Fiction, she shows other writers how to do what she did, step-by-step, writer to writer. Her process starts with a prep period for thinking through plot, theme, characters, and setting. Then Jaden provides day-by-day coaching for the thirty-day drafting period. Finally, her revision tips help writers turn merely workable drafts into compelling and publishable novels. A portion of publisher proceeds will be donated to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)


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Writers flock to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) each November because it provides a procrastination-busting deadline. But only a fraction of the participants meet their goal. Denise Jaden was part of that fraction, writing first drafts of her two published young adult novels during NaNoWriMo. In Fast Fiction, she shows other writers how to do what she did, step-b Writers flock to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) each November because it provides a procrastination-busting deadline. But only a fraction of the participants meet their goal. Denise Jaden was part of that fraction, writing first drafts of her two published young adult novels during NaNoWriMo. In Fast Fiction, she shows other writers how to do what she did, step-by-step, writer to writer. Her process starts with a prep period for thinking through plot, theme, characters, and setting. Then Jaden provides day-by-day coaching for the thirty-day drafting period. Finally, her revision tips help writers turn merely workable drafts into compelling and publishable novels. A portion of publisher proceeds will be donated to National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)

30 review for Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days

  1. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena

    I’m a slow novelist. It takes me several years to write each novel. It’s not something I’m particularly happy about, so the premise of Denise Jaden's Fast Fiction caught my eye. I have read other books which promise a novel in thirty days and most focus on quantity over quality and suggest that the end result is a finished product. Denise Jaden not only practices what she preaches, she advocates the use of fast writing as a means to a solid first draft, not as an end in itself. Fast Fiction is b I’m a slow novelist. It takes me several years to write each novel. It’s not something I’m particularly happy about, so the premise of Denise Jaden's Fast Fiction caught my eye. I have read other books which promise a novel in thirty days and most focus on quantity over quality and suggest that the end result is a finished product. Denise Jaden not only practices what she preaches, she advocates the use of fast writing as a means to a solid first draft, not as an end in itself. Fast Fiction is built around NaNoWriMo – National Novel-Writing Month – the month-long writing binge in November that keeps writers’ bottoms glued to chairs and manuscripts flowing. Jaden herself has completed the challenge every year since 2007, as well as her own March Madness challenge, and the process really seems to work for her. After reading Fast Fiction it’s easy to see why. The book is beautifully structured and full of practical exercises to get anyone, from first timers to experienced authors, writing quickly, and more importantly, effectively. Although it seems (to me, at my current rate of about 4,000 words a fortnight – sometimes a lot less) like an almost impossible goal to draft a novel in thirty days, Jaden makes it sound reasonably easy, breaking up the process into achievable chunks of 2,000 words a day, built around specific tasks that are designed to not only get your work done, but to ensure that all the elements of good storytelling are addressed. The book is designed to be used in a kinaesthetic way – through practical exercises that take the writer from the brainstorming of story ideas through to a three-act plot, writing a workable synopsis, creating characters, working up dialogue, themes, setting, building conflict, using symbols, setting scenes, and working up a cohesive story plan (or outline). All of these are elements of good fiction, and Jaden covers them in a surprising amount of detail and in a way which is not facile at all. She provides a lot of ideas and tips on how to maximise the quality (not just quantity) of these elements and to pull them together in a way which will make the writing binge far easier and more focused. The exercises that comprise part one are all pre-work, and ideally would happen prior to the 30 day period so that when you actually sit down to do your 30 days of 2,000 words a day, you’re well set up. Part two is a very hands-on and detailed guide to get the draft out. Building on the outline you’ve set up, this section provides a series of guided tasks each day, from defining genre to having your character do something self-less. Each task is an excellent means for systematic progression that also deepens the plot, character, settings, and conflict that were set up in the beginning. Throughout the book there are examples - some from Jaden's work and some from classics, templates, blank diagrams, and really innovative techniques like character “speed-drills” and interviews, creating visual “wordles”, storyboarding, and a perfect overview ‘cheat-sheet’ that re-caps the process. There is also a brief chapter on revising, which is, again, highly practical and for its brevity, surprisingly valuable. Fast Fiction is so neatly structured and organised, and so warm and accessible, that it’s impossible not to believe that drafting a novel in thirty days isn’t possible. Jaden’s enthusiasm comes through her own writing and coaching and extracting commitment are all part of the deal. Nor does Jaden underplay either the importance of, or the work involved in, revising. The final book may take over a year to revise (and Jaden advises letting it sit for a good period of time before beginning to revise). Though I’m over mid-way through my third novel, I found this book exceptionally valuable – not just as a start-to-finish primer, though it certainly can be used that way to good effect (I’m now seriously considering signing up for Camp NaNoWriMo to fast track my next novel), but also to spent 30 days tightening up an existing work, looking at it with a critical, structured eye. Fast Fiction is a surprisingly efficacious and valuable tool for anyone who wants to write a novel – more quickly, and also, more powerfully.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    If you're like most writers, you want to write a book. Even if you don't call yourself a writer you might want to write a book. There are so many stories waiting to be told and, who knows, you might be the person to tell it. What's great about author Denise Jaden's latest book Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days is she makes you feel like digging out the story deep inside you is possible. And the 30 days thing? Bonus. I've wanted to write a book for a w If you're like most writers, you want to write a book. Even if you don't call yourself a writer you might want to write a book. There are so many stories waiting to be told and, who knows, you might be the person to tell it. What's great about author Denise Jaden's latest book Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days is she makes you feel like digging out the story deep inside you is possible. And the 30 days thing? Bonus. I've wanted to write a book for a while now, maybe forever. As a kid I drafted a 100-page Choose Your Own Adventure of twin girls who get lost in Mexico while trying to find an orphanage (scary part—I experienced this trip IRL 10 years later with a friend…) and for the last two years I have felt like it's time to try for real. And I have. Tried that is. But I keep getting stuck and I have never known why. Fast Fiction tells me why: I didn't know how to write a book. I didn't plan it beforehand, I just sat down at the computer and expected it to come together. After reading Jaden's book I finally get it . I do have a book in me I just didn't have the tools to dig it out. This practical, well-written guide is broken into three manageable parts. Before, during, and after. Before the Draft This section is all about preparing to draft—the most important part of writing your book! I love how Jaden approaches drafting. It's a time to dream, to think outside the box, and to try new things. After you collect your dreams and ideas you can begin narrowing your story idea into once sentence. Then, you determine your plot. This is such valuable information. She breaks down the plots of familiar stories and shows you the practical progression a story needs to take in order to work. It makes so much sense and adds much-needed order to an otherwise overwhelming process. Part one continues and covers characters, theme, setting, symbols, scenes, and story. I found this section not only valuable but inspiring. My notebook overflowed with ideas while reading this section. This likely says more about where I'm at in the writing-a-book process than anything else but I can't wait to read through this again when I plot my actual book. During the Draft I skimmed part two because I am not writing my book right now. However, I came away with the assurance this would be what I needed to help me break up my writing schedule into achievable chunks. Part two also breaks down where you should be after each day of writing, and gives you prompts and questions to think about if you're stuck. There's a handy summary of the progress breakdown at the end of this section so you can have a guide if you don't require all the explanation and prompts. Jaden thought of everything! After the Draft Part three it scheduled to happen after your 30 days of writing in part two. So although the title suggests a 30-day project you'll have to set aside more time than that to follow the plan laid out in Fast Fiction. What's great about this is if you follow the plan you will have a first draft in 30 days and you'll have planned it properly in advance (in part one). So when you reach part three (aka revisions) you will know your characters, plot, story, and purpose inside and out. Revisions might…even…be…fun? One of the strongest tips in this section is the Why Should I Care? test. You read through your draft and think like your reader. Ask yourself this question and if you can't answer it, this section or idea needs strengthening. Jaden suggests all sorts of ways to help you revise weaker sections like adding new characters and conflict. Oooh conflict. This section also suggests what to look for when reading through your draft. This is helpful because it helps you figure out why something doesn't work. Once you know why, you can fix it. I'm happy to give Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days a five-star rating. I think the only thing left to do here is test out the formula for myself. Is there a book in me? We'll find out soon. Denise Jaden is the author of Losing Faith (Simon and Schuster, 2010) and Never Enough (Simon and Schuster 2012). She lives in British Columbia with her husband and son, and is currently at work on another young-adult novel, which she fast-drafted during the 2012 NaNoWriMo. A portion of profits will benefit National Novel Writing Month. This book was provided for review by the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review (or even publish one).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Loren

    Faulkner wrote As I Lay Dying in under a month. I can draft a story outline in a night. Not the same thing. Yet again we have a blogger who thinks she's a writer who seems to be confused as to the extensive difference between the following two media forms the novel & the film. I like to believe there is something new to be learned from everyone. This a good book to read if you are interested in writing commercial middle school fantasy fiction with the hopes of immediate film adaptation. Faulkner wrote As I Lay Dying in under a month. I can draft a story outline in a night. Not the same thing. Yet again we have a blogger who thinks she's a writer who seems to be confused as to the extensive difference between the following two media forms the novel & the film. I like to believe there is something new to be learned from everyone. This a good book to read if you are interested in writing commercial middle school fantasy fiction with the hopes of immediate film adaptation.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ron Estrada

    A fantastic primer for the new novelist and a good review for the veteran. Denise outlines the steps to getting your first draft written fast, with no major plot revisions. Highly recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Judith Graves

    Read an advance copy of this...loved it: Forget the fact that this resource is marketed for those wanting to complete a fast draft - if you're out to get your novel done, period, Jaden's Fast Fiction will be the kick in the ass that gets you there, from story plan to THE END...and beyond. Read an advance copy of this...loved it: Forget the fact that this resource is marketed for those wanting to complete a fast draft - if you're out to get your novel done, period, Jaden's Fast Fiction will be the kick in the ass that gets you there, from story plan to THE END...and beyond.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Quinn

    Always wanted to write a book? Have the story but don't know how to start--or keep going to write a novel? Denise Jaden has your answer. "Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days" is the answer to most of the question you've had about how to write that novel. I was a bit skeptical when I picked up the book. I may have even muttered about the way we do everything so fast and without real thought. But after I read the book, I changed my mind. Jaden herself s Always wanted to write a book? Have the story but don't know how to start--or keep going to write a novel? Denise Jaden has your answer. "Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days" is the answer to most of the question you've had about how to write that novel. I was a bit skeptical when I picked up the book. I may have even muttered about the way we do everything so fast and without real thought. But after I read the book, I changed my mind. Jaden herself says, "If someone had told me during my early writing days that I would be able to write a draft of an entire book in less than a month, I probably would have though they were crazy," Jaden guides you through the first draft of a 50,000 word novel. The book is divided into three parts--Before the Draft, During the Draft, and After the Draft. She doesn't leave you hanging with a draft and no idea what to do. But I'm leaping too far ahead. In Before the Draft, you'll learn how to narrow down the idea for your novel, separate plot from story idea, and set a three-act structure (and she tells you how to do each step.) You will also learn why theme is important, how much to develop your characters (and how much to let them develop themselves), and why setting is important. She helps you develop a list of scenes (in clear terms), and to write a story plan and how you will write your first draft. All of this will happen before you start launching into During Your Draft. In that section, you will get help for each of 30 days in which you are going to draft your novel. Jaden reminds you that it is a first draft, not a finished product. One of the pieces of the book I found most useful is the weekly checkpoints she helps you set at the beginning of the 30-days. For each of the 30 days of drafting, there is an encouraging portion of avoiding pitfalls, writing tips, and hints. Then there is a Simple Task for each day. Following her advice and using the tips will have you writing 2,000 words a day. I expected to hear some repetition in the 30-day section, but there wasn't any. Each day is molded by the goal for that week, and has a new idea and fresh approach to old writing problems. No clichés, no trite affirmations, no platitudes. The last section, After the Draft, Jaden talks about revisions, using first readers to help you identify problem areas, and how to fix those areas. I found myself wanting to write a novel for the first time in a long time, just to try out her method. I love the positive town that never sounds cheerleader-ish, and the real advice.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This book has rarely found information - a specific, step-by-step guide to creating a novel. While most books on writing meander around the author's opinions and thoughts, this book gets right to the point. The author gives guides each day that are vague enough to not stifle creativity, and even includes options for variety. Can be used even if you don't follow the initial outlining process, the daily assignments can be used as inspiration or a way to add a new obstacle. I haven't followed the p This book has rarely found information - a specific, step-by-step guide to creating a novel. While most books on writing meander around the author's opinions and thoughts, this book gets right to the point. The author gives guides each day that are vague enough to not stifle creativity, and even includes options for variety. Can be used even if you don't follow the initial outlining process, the daily assignments can be used as inspiration or a way to add a new obstacle. I haven't followed the process beginning to end, but eagerly look forward to trying it. I'm a 'pantser' as they say and have always had trouble following 3-act structure. Breaking it down like this makes it look much more approachable. My only concern is that adhering too closely to the guides could produce homogeneous work, but as long as you are writing thoughtfully, a simple structure shouldn't detract from a good story. The book is simple, accessible and entertainingly written. As a bonus, it includes some very brief but decent advice on revision. Recommended whether you do NaNoWriMo or not.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cara

    A thoughtful and easy-to-follow guide for anyone who wants to try NaNo, or just wants something to help them get started/increase word count. Highly recommended. Also, the planning was not at all overwhelming for a pantser like me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shawna

    Just what I needed to get my Nanowrimo novel started! Now I am bursting with creativity and I can't wait to start writing!! I've learned so much about plot complexity and character development! Thanks Denise Jaden! Just what I needed to get my Nanowrimo novel started! Now I am bursting with creativity and I can't wait to start writing!! I've learned so much about plot complexity and character development! Thanks Denise Jaden!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I read this book in one sitting and LOVED it. I can't wait to start my next book and will definitely be using Jaden's guide. The techniques are easy to understand and doable for any writer, whether they are a beginner or more advanced. I read this book in one sitting and LOVED it. I can't wait to start my next book and will definitely be using Jaden's guide. The techniques are easy to understand and doable for any writer, whether they are a beginner or more advanced.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Great advice for planning, drafting, and editing! Helped me win my first NaNoWriMo and edit one of my novels. Strongly recommended for any writer!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Solid read. Good planning exercises. Bought it to reference later for NaNoWriMo.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bracton

    Same advice you can find elsewhere. I do like this author's spirit. Same advice you can find elsewhere. I do like this author's spirit.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aloysius Kling Jr.

    To a new writer, the thought of writing 50,000 words in one month for NaNoWriMo can seem an impossible task. I never thought it was possible myself, at least not for a part time writer. However, Denise Jaden thinks it’s not only possible, but she also wrote a book to help writers of all skill levels accomplish this seemingly impossible task. In Fast Fiction, she shows us how to outline and write a first-draft novel in thirty days, regardless of whether we do it during NaNoWriMo or not. Now, I’ve To a new writer, the thought of writing 50,000 words in one month for NaNoWriMo can seem an impossible task. I never thought it was possible myself, at least not for a part time writer. However, Denise Jaden thinks it’s not only possible, but she also wrote a book to help writers of all skill levels accomplish this seemingly impossible task. In Fast Fiction, she shows us how to outline and write a first-draft novel in thirty days, regardless of whether we do it during NaNoWriMo or not. Now, I’ve never written 50,000 words in a month before. Not even after participating in CampNaNoWriMo last month, but Fast Fiction makes it seem a lot easier than I thought. Parts of the book are designed to be read before, during, and after you write your novel. Part One: Before the Draft is meant to be read the month prior to NaNoWriMo, or whatever month you plan to write your novel in. There are chapters on plot and the three-act structure, creating characters, themes, setting, writing scenes, and putting it all together. The intent of part one is to prepare you to write, and if you do everything she prescribes, you’ll start NaNoWriMo with a good outline and foundation, which will keep you from having those “I have no idea what to write next” days. Part Two: During the Draft is meant to be read throughout the month as your write your novel. There are 30 separate two-three page chapters that are intended to be read at the start of your writing session each day. I thought they were a great way to get my mind straight before I started knocking out my daily word count. The small chapters provide both inspiration to keep you motivated during the month as well as giving small tasks to focus on as you write the day’s passage. Part Three: After the Draft is the shortest section of the book. In it, Jaden gives us some brief thoughts on what to focus on during the revision process. She also provides a list of other books and resources. I ordered Fast Fiction about two weeks before the start of April’s CampNaNoWriMo, so I was a little behind the power curve already, but I prepared as much as I could, following Jaden’s instructions. As I’m a fairly new writer, my goal was also set a lot lower than 50,000 words. However, I followed along during the month, reading each daily chapter as intended. I wasn’t always far enough along in my story to apply the guidance from the day’s passage, but it still helped keep me motivated and on track. When the month was over, I had written 25% more than I originally planned, but 10,000 words is a far cry from 50,000. Still, it was a great experience for me. I rate Fast Fiction four stars. It’s a good read for anyone considering their first NaNoWriMo or for a new writer who needs help figuring out the basics and wants a little guidance and motivation. It’s a book that is intended to be reread, which is why my copy will be sitting on my desk next to the keyboard for a while.  I plan to do the full blown NaNoWriMo in November and another Camp in July. I may not be ready to write 50,000 in one month yet, but Jaden has shown me that it’s only a matter of perseverance and time before I get there.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katie Cunningham

    If you've done NaNoWriMo, you're familiar with the hectic pace that comes with trying to write a book in 30 days. In general, the advice tend to encourage the writer to grow more chaotic to help them get across the finish line (Add a new character! Follow weird plot threads! How about a sex scene?) This book takes a different tack, instead encouraging the reader to stick to a plan with the hopes of having a full first draft at the end of 30 days. After a few years of the frantic pace style Nano, If you've done NaNoWriMo, you're familiar with the hectic pace that comes with trying to write a book in 30 days. In general, the advice tend to encourage the writer to grow more chaotic to help them get across the finish line (Add a new character! Follow weird plot threads! How about a sex scene?) This book takes a different tack, instead encouraging the reader to stick to a plan with the hopes of having a full first draft at the end of 30 days. After a few years of the frantic pace style Nano, I think I want to try this next year. The book has three sections: Outlining and prep, actual writing, and revision. If you've read a few books about writing, the first section will be mostly review (though you should read it anyway since there are also tasks involved). The second section goes day by day and tells you what you should be adding to your writing today so that you stay on track. The final section goes over next steps, including taking a break and finding readers for a second draft. Pros: * A very quick read, which is somewhat novel in the books about writing genre * I loved the day-by-day breakdowns. I can see where they'd be super helpful during a draft month. * Encourages a writer to stay on track, and what to do if they get distracted. * A good amount of helpful cheerleading, rather than empty cheerleading ("Everyone one gets stuck! Do X to try to get unstuck." is more helpful than "Just keep writing!") Cons: * Heavily leans on a three-act structure. Since I plan on using one for a future story, that's fine by me, but it's worth mentioning. * The start is a bit of a review if you've been in the writing world for a while. I mostly skimmed it, looking for tasks to do. * One of the books recommended for revisions is apparently out of print and insanely expensive :\

  16. 4 out of 5

    F.M.

    This book offers some good insights on writing fiction. Most are common sense, not particularly novel (no pun intended), and easier said than done, e.g., put in the time, don’t give up! The book also tells aspiring fiction writers to invest what struck me as an unrealistic amount of time and effort on cute-sounding prep projects designed to “feed your muse” — things like theme “wordles,” character and setting diagrams, inspirational image boards, character interviews, etc. Some of these things, This book offers some good insights on writing fiction. Most are common sense, not particularly novel (no pun intended), and easier said than done, e.g., put in the time, don’t give up! The book also tells aspiring fiction writers to invest what struck me as an unrealistic amount of time and effort on cute-sounding prep projects designed to “feed your muse” — things like theme “wordles,” character and setting diagrams, inspirational image boards, character interviews, etc. Some of these things, like the diagrams designed to keep a story focused and organized, seem like they could be helpful. Others struck me as unproductive busy work and a waste of time. Chapter 8 is what made this book worth it for me. In two pages, this chapter lays out a template for a Story Plan. This has been the challenge for me or seemingly for any aspiring fiction writer with some solid plot ideas, but who is daunted by the task of weaving together a cogent, compelling, and structurally sound novel from beginning to end. This book also offers some helpful writing prompts to help jump start writers when they’re not quite sure what to write or where to begin. Another helpful point that is made with emphasis in this book, which I struggle mightily with, is that as a writer is writing, “don’t look back at what you’ve written over previous days. By looking back, you’ll be tempted to edit, and looking back opens the door for self-doubt to creep in. ... This is probably the most important guideline of this whole book... Don’t go over any of your writing until you’ve written to the end of your story.” Overall, this book was an easy and quick read (185 pages) and mostly worth the time and money I spent on it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Debra Daniels-Zeller

    This is a great inspiring book on how to quickly write a first draft and is intended to be a day by day guide during your 30 days of novel writing. She also gives lots of ideas of what to do before starting yor first draft as well as some essentials about novels such as plot, thee-act structure, backstory, the characters, creating villians, what your characters want and secondary characters. She leaves nothing out, even naming your characters. This is a book I can refer to again and again for ad This is a great inspiring book on how to quickly write a first draft and is intended to be a day by day guide during your 30 days of novel writing. She also gives lots of ideas of what to do before starting yor first draft as well as some essentials about novels such as plot, thee-act structure, backstory, the characters, creating villians, what your characters want and secondary characters. She leaves nothing out, even naming your characters. This is a book I can refer to again and again for advice and inspiration.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Reallyninja

    I am sure it works well for novel that follow a certain format. Mine doesn't and immediately much of this exercise is moot. I can live with that but it would have been nice to have been able to use this book during my fast draft. Meh. I am sure it works well for novel that follow a certain format. Mine doesn't and immediately much of this exercise is moot. I can live with that but it would have been nice to have been able to use this book during my fast draft. Meh.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Phillips

    3.5

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deanna Howard

    A quick motivational and uplifting book to get a story out of your head and on paper. I will likely reread.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

    This guide was fast-drafted.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    A great resource for quickly drafting a novel.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nyx

    This book is an invaluable tool to any writer who is interested in fast drafting. I decided to participate in NaNoWriMo for the first time this year but I was at a bit of a loss, since I'd never written a novel or even a short story. It didn't help that I wasn't really familiar with the NaNoWriMo process, either. However, after searching online, I learned about Fast Fiction and decided to give it a try. It is a comprehensive guide that is helpful and engaging from the start. It's written convers This book is an invaluable tool to any writer who is interested in fast drafting. I decided to participate in NaNoWriMo for the first time this year but I was at a bit of a loss, since I'd never written a novel or even a short story. It didn't help that I wasn't really familiar with the NaNoWriMo process, either. However, after searching online, I learned about Fast Fiction and decided to give it a try. It is a comprehensive guide that is helpful and engaging from the start. It's written conversationally with real-world examples so it felt like I was being mentored, rather than being simply told what to do. It is the ideal book, not just for WriMos, but for anyone who wants to write a novel draft in a short period of time. Denise Jaden guides you through the prep month so that you're truly ready to start writing and then, she provides helpful hints and tasks to keep you motivated during the month of writing. Afterward, she also gives you expert advice about what to do next, once you've completed the challenge. I didn't need to consult any other books after finding this one as Denise Jaden thoroughly covered fast draft writing from A-to-Z. I completed my first challenge in 25 days and I don't think I could have done it without Denise Jaden's Fast Fiction.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Holli

    This book has a good premise and follow through. I also like that a portion of the proceeds for it goes toward NaNoWriMo, one of my favorite websites and yearly challenges. It also pleases me that this one works with NaNoWriMo, rather than against it. I've read at least one how-to book on writing that actually bashed NaNo a bit. Not the best way to make a good impression when this challenge is so well-known and loved. This book has some tips and things I've read in other books but also has other This book has a good premise and follow through. I also like that a portion of the proceeds for it goes toward NaNoWriMo, one of my favorite websites and yearly challenges. It also pleases me that this one works with NaNoWriMo, rather than against it. I've read at least one how-to book on writing that actually bashed NaNo a bit. Not the best way to make a good impression when this challenge is so well-known and loved. This book has some tips and things I've read in other books but also has others somewhat unique to itself and its author I may try when I plan my next book, whether for NaNo or otherwise. It is an easy and fast read and set up quite well. The day-to-day breakdown doesn't really work with how I write. It is still a welcome addition for those this would work for. I recommend it to any who have a wish to try to get a first draft of a book written quickly Whether for NaNo or for whatever writing project they wish to tackle. COYER: Read a book with a number in the title. (Fast Fiction: A Guide to Outlining and Writing a First-Draft Novel in Thirty Days; 4 points)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tamara Hajdu

    The title is a bit of a misnomer. It’s only possible to write a first draft in 30 days, if pre-work that’s required for it has been done. Chapter 7 was about storylining. And not just the main beats, it was ‘write down every scene’. I was shocked. This is like putting together a 1000 piece puzzle! Surely this is not something people knock off in a short period of time?!? I like the structure of this book but you’ve got to be realistic about how long these things take. Will update this review once The title is a bit of a misnomer. It’s only possible to write a first draft in 30 days, if pre-work that’s required for it has been done. Chapter 7 was about storylining. And not just the main beats, it was ‘write down every scene’. I was shocked. This is like putting together a 1000 piece puzzle! Surely this is not something people knock off in a short period of time?!? I like the structure of this book but you’ve got to be realistic about how long these things take. Will update this review once I’ve worked through the entire 30 days...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mindi Scott

    I blurbed this book! "FAST FICTION is full of strategies and insights that will inspire and motivate writers of every experience level." I blurbed this book! "FAST FICTION is full of strategies and insights that will inspire and motivate writers of every experience level."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Read again, one year later.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Great outline. Would like to own a copy!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Good tutorial, easy to read. Now to put the knowhow into practice during NaNoWriMo 2016!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Louise

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