Hot Best Seller

Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically

Availability: Ready to download

This introductory theology text explains key concepts in Christian doctrine and shows that doctrine is integrally linked to the practical realities of Christian life. In order to grow into more faithful practitioners of Christianity, we need to engage in the practice of learning doctrine and understanding how it shapes faithful lives. Beth Felker Jones helps students artic This introductory theology text explains key concepts in Christian doctrine and shows that doctrine is integrally linked to the practical realities of Christian life. In order to grow into more faithful practitioners of Christianity, we need to engage in the practice of learning doctrine and understanding how it shapes faithful lives. Beth Felker Jones helps students articulate basic Christian doctrines, think theologically so they can act Christianly in a diverse world, and connect Christian thought to their everyday life of faith.This book, written from a solidly evangelical yet ecumenically aware perspective, models a way of doing theology that is generous and charitable. It attends to history and contemporary debates and features voices from the global church. Sidebars made up of illustrative quotations, key Scripture passages, classic hymn texts, and devotional poetry punctuate the chapters.


Compare

This introductory theology text explains key concepts in Christian doctrine and shows that doctrine is integrally linked to the practical realities of Christian life. In order to grow into more faithful practitioners of Christianity, we need to engage in the practice of learning doctrine and understanding how it shapes faithful lives. Beth Felker Jones helps students artic This introductory theology text explains key concepts in Christian doctrine and shows that doctrine is integrally linked to the practical realities of Christian life. In order to grow into more faithful practitioners of Christianity, we need to engage in the practice of learning doctrine and understanding how it shapes faithful lives. Beth Felker Jones helps students articulate basic Christian doctrines, think theologically so they can act Christianly in a diverse world, and connect Christian thought to their everyday life of faith.This book, written from a solidly evangelical yet ecumenically aware perspective, models a way of doing theology that is generous and charitable. It attends to history and contemporary debates and features voices from the global church. Sidebars made up of illustrative quotations, key Scripture passages, classic hymn texts, and devotional poetry punctuate the chapters.

30 review for Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Fritz

    Great introduction to theology! I really appreciated the catholicity of the book, focusing on the things that all believers agree on and using the work of thinkers from many different branches of the church.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Christopher A. Hall said it best: “A wise, well-written introduction to the wonder and joy of Christian doctrine.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gems Gordon

    Simple in the complexity of Christian doctrine, this is a great book to gain one's theological footing whilst recognizing a call to both understand what Christians believe and live accordingly. Simple in the complexity of Christian doctrine, this is a great book to gain one's theological footing whilst recognizing a call to both understand what Christians believe and live accordingly.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    This is a great, introductory theology text, and is more readable than other introductory texts I’ve looked at in the past. I appreciate that it pushes towards the integration of faith and practice.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Vance Christiaanse

    A typical text is written from the "I'm right and everyone who disagrees with me is wrong" perspective. The perspective of this book is refreshingly different: "Here is an overview of what Evangelical Christians agree on, plus both sides of many issues they disagree on, plus an acknowledgement of many of the places those outside Evangelicalism would disagree." That last part is accomplished mostly like this: instead of breezily asserting all the Evangelical truths as though preaching to the choi A typical text is written from the "I'm right and everyone who disagrees with me is wrong" perspective. The perspective of this book is refreshingly different: "Here is an overview of what Evangelical Christians agree on, plus both sides of many issues they disagree on, plus an acknowledgement of many of the places those outside Evangelicalism would disagree." That last part is accomplished mostly like this: instead of breezily asserting all the Evangelical truths as though preaching to the choir, Jones asserts some of the truths through clenched teeth, making it obvious to readers which ones are problematic. I would like to see every Evangelical Christian read this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Cash

    This is the first book I’ve ever won from Goodreads First Reads, and in the past week or so I’ve won three other books. I’m one lucky dog! I wasn’t sure how much I was going to enjoy this book (I couldn't imagine some book I won could be that good) but when I read the first few chapters I was quite surprised by how informative, enjoyable, and lucid this book is. I found Jones’s work to be a pleasing introduction to the world of theology. As someone who has been a student of apologetics, my knowl This is the first book I’ve ever won from Goodreads First Reads, and in the past week or so I’ve won three other books. I’m one lucky dog! I wasn’t sure how much I was going to enjoy this book (I couldn't imagine some book I won could be that good) but when I read the first few chapters I was quite surprised by how informative, enjoyable, and lucid this book is. I found Jones’s work to be a pleasing introduction to the world of theology. As someone who has been a student of apologetics, my knowledge of theology was good but not well-rounded. This book cleared up a lot of questions I had about different viewpoints and definitions of several theological terms. Jones successfully makes sure that the reader doesn't get too bogged down in studying God by including the occasional poem or hymn of praise that reminds one of His greatness. She presents many of the arguments for a wide variety of theological issues that are important to understand. Although this is a well-done portion of the book, it is not without its flaws. While some would see the absence of a obvious author opinion as a quality, it makes it difficult to see the author as a person when she does not make any comments based from opinion. I am aware that this book is meant to be a more scholarly work, but for the average reader, the feeling of a connection or understanding with the author is essential. Jones covers many heretical teachings of the church throughout the centuries that, while informative and enlightening in a way that helps us avoid these theological missteps, creates a problem where the reader might get bored and drug down through seemingly needless detail on controversies that have been long solved. I don’t think the exploration of these heresies was unnecessary or bad so to say, but I will admit that the detail put into them became tiring after a period of time. The author includes theological perspectives from world theologians in places like Africa or South America. Why the author is interested in presenting these views or what it has do with her and/or the material goes unexplained. I would say its most likely due to her fascination with the ecumenical church, but this interest alone cannot explain why these views would be explored when the purpose of the book is supposed to be learning to think and live theologically. Not to study worldviews on God. It’s somewhat difficult to tell who the audience for this book is supposed to be. Even as a longtime laymen student of apologetics and some theology I learned plenty of new things, but there was a lot of material that I couldn’t imagine someone reading this kind of book wouldn’t already know. It is an introduction, so I understand trying to flesh out some of the basics, but the book sometimes dives into basics that anyone who has attended church for a half year would understand. A minor complaint of mine would be Jones’s reliance on the quotes of John Wesley, whom she uses incessantly. I would assume from this that she is a follower of Wesleyanism, but even so I would have liked more of a variety of sources quoted. She sticks to her favorites and doesn’t branch too far out from there. The biggest problem is the theme of the book, “practicing Christian doctrine.” While the title of the book makes the premise sound like the book will be approaching theology from a fresh angle by trying to show how theology can affect you and make you live life differently, this aspect is relegated to barely a cameo appearance. Jones spends most of each chapter summarizing each topic as it is viewed in theology, and at the end of the chapter she uses about a page to try to explain how this affects the way you’ll live life. While I enjoyed the book and gained a lot from it, this premise of “living and thinking theologically” appears to be merely a tacked-on gimmick to sell what is otherwise an introductory theology text to a wider audience. If Jones had only spent more time on each section detailing this topic, it might not be a problem. As it is, it appears that Jones is desperately attempting to figure out a tie-in to the theme for each chapter even when there isn't one. And lastly, the book ends without much of a sense of closure due to the neglect of the main premise. The last chapter is a good one that deals with eschatology (teaching of the last things like heaven, hell, the second coming, etc.) but after that is a benediction and the book ends. Jones should have ended it by including a final chapter that summarizes the book’s main points and argues for the practice of its subject. She attempts to do so in the benediction, but it is not quite as effective as a last chapter could have been. If this book were to enter a second printing, I would keep the benediction but add the needed chapter. Overall, despite my criticisms, I'm partial towards the book and I was happy to read it. I learned a lot, and I would recommend it to those who are looking for an introductory theology work that is understandable to the layman. It’s not perfect, but it does an intelligent job. 3.5

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    would recommend :)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    This book is low-key genius. Why? Jones goes over the foundational doctrinal areas within the Christian faith, explains the heart of it, how it changes how we live practically in the world AND THEN she talks about early Christian heresies and what makes them heresy in transgressing against the specific doctrines... not just as theological hair-splitting, but she presents why that matters as it relates to the way we follow Jesus in the world. So good! Bonus points: This book pairs really well with This book is low-key genius. Why? Jones goes over the foundational doctrinal areas within the Christian faith, explains the heart of it, how it changes how we live practically in the world AND THEN she talks about early Christian heresies and what makes them heresy in transgressing against the specific doctrines... not just as theological hair-splitting, but she presents why that matters as it relates to the way we follow Jesus in the world. So good! Bonus points: This book pairs really well with Kallistos Ware's "The Orthodox way". The chapters map nearly exactly onto each other, and reading together gives a feel for the differences in approaching theology between East and West.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Johnston

    In her book, Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically, Wheaton University’s Dr. Beth Felker Jones presents an argument that theology is not just for academic discussion. No, theology must go beyond ivory tower philosophical gymnastics and have a deeply practical nature. Her other books are Faithful: A Theology of Sex, God the Spirit: Introducing Pneumatology in Wesleyan and Ecumenical Perspective, and The Marks of His Wounds: Resurrection Doctrine and G In her book, Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically, Wheaton University’s Dr. Beth Felker Jones presents an argument that theology is not just for academic discussion. No, theology must go beyond ivory tower philosophical gymnastics and have a deeply practical nature. Her other books are Faithful: A Theology of Sex, God the Spirit: Introducing Pneumatology in Wesleyan and Ecumenical Perspective, and The Marks of His Wounds: Resurrection Doctrine and Gender Politics. These works along with her emphasis on systematic theology at Wheaton College and her work for the publication, The Christian Century where she writes on media, give her a substantial authority in the area of theology and doctrine. However, as evidenced in Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically, theology is a way we live. In the book, Dr. Felker Jones covers the theological doctrines of speaking of God, knowing God, the Trinity, Creation, God’s Image, Christology, Soteriology, Pneumatology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology. These overviews are brief but profound. The chapters bring the reader into the historical development and complexities of each doctrine. However, Dr. Felker Jones does stop with an explanation of doctrine but emphasizes application. As she states in her Introduction: “The study of doctrine belongs right in the middle of the Christian life. It is part of our worship of God and service to God’s people. Jesus commanded us to love God with our mind as well as our heart, soul, and strength (Luke 10:27). All four are connected: the heart’s passion, the soul’s yearning, the strength God grants us, and the intellectual task of seeking the truth of God. This means that the study of doctrine is an act of love for God: in studying the things of God, we are formed as worshipers and as God’s servants in the world. To practice doctrine is to yearn for a deeper understanding of the Christian faith, to seek the logic and the beauty of that faith, and to live out what we have learned in the everyday realities of the Christian life.” Jesus in Luke 10:27 implored His followers to love God with their whole being. That means that theology must have a practical end, not just an intellectual one. This theology, this collection of doctrines, is historical. The Christian’s theological heritage is built upon the practical need to work out beliefs in the face of daunting heresies. Dr. Felker Jones, reviewing David Bebbington’s view on theology, further states: "Evangelical Christianity is orthodox because it shares the doctrinal commitments of the early church’s creedal tradition, such as a belief in a Triune God. This orthodoxy is a point of connection between evangelicals and the bigger Christian story, beginning with the early church." This dedication to the historical connection is evident throughout the book. Dr. Felker Jones consistently through each chapter connects the current day understanding of doctrines back to the origin and development of thought. In this way, the reader is led through the necessary and practical nature of the doctrine. Learning why a doctrine developed is essential in learning why the doctrine is essential and practical today. For example, consider the chapter on Ecclesiology (in my mind the finest chapter in the book). Starting with Acts chapter 15, Dr. Felker Jones develops this doctrine with an eye towards the realistic notion of what Church is to Protestants, Roman Catholics, and Orthodox Christians. Acts 15 is crucial because it marks an intense moment of discernment of her leaders. The Church had to decide how to handle the Gentiles; whether to force them to adhere to Jewish laws (circumcision specifically) or not. The tension was between remaining faithful to the Jewish nature of the church while at the same time opening the Gospel to all peoples. Again, Dr. Felker Jones speaks to the practical nature of this debate: “It matters that this decision is made, not against what God has done in Israel, but in continuity with God’s work in Israel as testified to in Scripture. The new church agrees “with the words of the prophets” (v. 15) and with things God has been making “known from long ago” (v. 18). To free gentile converts from the requirement of circumcision is not to ignore the holiness of God’s law, but it is to recognize the heart of the law.” Further: “The church of Jesus Christ is this joyous community: the community that rejoices in God’s gracious salvation. The church is the community that opens up, through that grace, to proclaim Christ’s peace to those “who were far off” and to “those who were near” (Eph. 2:17). This is the community that makes room for the Gentiles to be grafted in, not by sacrificing its identity, but by clarifying that identity: the church is the people of God, called out to bear visible witness, in the body and as a body, to the free and transformative gift of grace we have received in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. As we practice ecclesiology, the doctrine of the church, we learn what it means to be the people who were once “called ‘the uncircumcision’” (Eph. 2:11) because we were estranged from God, a people of aliens made citizens, strangers made children, those “who once were far off” and have “been brought near by the blood of Christ” (Eph. 2:13).”(Emphasis mine) This theme increases in importance later in the chapter when she discusses unity. Unity, in the face of a broken and separated Body, is an essential and practical piece to understand Ecclesiology. How Christians of all flavors understand and commune with each other reflects on who we are as Christ followers. Dr. Felker Jones moves to John 17:17,18, reviewing how this can be realized. “The church is to be in the world, like Jesus. If this extraordinary comparison were not enough, Jesus then makes one that is even more daunting, praying that church unity would be like the unity he shares with the Father. Trinitarian unity is the truest and realest unity, and Jesus wants the church to be a reflection of that. Next, Jesus names the basis on which the church may hope to be one: the glory of the Father given to us by Jesus (v. 22). Unity, no less than any other aspect of sanctification, is not a work we can perform under our own power. Unity is something that must come by the grace of Christ.” Later in the chapter she further reflects on this unity and how it affects the missional nature of the Church: “This kind of visible, unified practice strengthens and nurtures the body for a second kind of practice, one identified by many contemporary ecclesiologists who see that church happens when we are faithful in mission. Christian faith is a missionary faith, and the Christian church is a missionary church.” As with all the chapters in the book, Dr. Felker Jones finished the chapter on Ecclesiology with a reflection on the practice of the doctrine. The Church, fractured as she is, must be seen as a community devoted to the foundation of the Apostles and Jesus. Practicing Ecclesiology involves praying for grace to love other believers and be open to how God will use the Church’s brokenness as a “witness to his grace.” This witness shines the light on how the church was, how the Church is, how the Church will be. Throughout the book, Dr. Felker Jones displays great respect for all Christian traditions. Although she does dip into the Wesleyan well quite a bit (with 27 citations, Jean Calvin being second with 9 citations), she takes excellent care do correctly state differing theologies without completely tipping her hand on her individual stand. This is an essential skill for this kind of book. In order to convince Christians that what they believe matters in practice as well as in belief, an author must respect different tradition in approaching these, at times, controversial doctrinal differences. For example, the chapter on soteriology starts with an acknowledgment of differences: “Jesus’s work as savior is inexhaustible in both breadth and depth, and it is appropriate that soteriology should reflect some of that abundance. The doctrine of salvation is one of the areas of Christian thought where we see wide diversity—including disagreement—among different theological traditions, but this does not mean that there is no recognizable Christian consensus about soteriology.” She continues in her development of soteriology by examining the commonalities of the doctrine. Starting with a review of Brenda Colijn’s work on salvation theses in scripture, Dr. Felker Jones explores the critical beginning concepts of salvation: conscience, contrition, election, and repentance. She then moves to the doctrine of Justification. The section begins with a review of the beginning conflicts of this doctrine in the sixteenth century. Being sensitive that this time period does draw up strong emotions on both the Catholic and Protestant side, she briefly reviews Martin Luther and his impact on the subject. Without pulling punches, but yet being respectful of Roman Catholic theology as it is properly understood (as opposed to how it is improperly abused), she can bring the concepts of sola fide, sola gratia, sola Christus into a proper perspective. The doctrines of Sanctification and final redemption are treated with equal care. What this leads to is her section in the chapter on the dynamics of grace and human freedom. Because Dr. Felker Jones has taken great care to respect all sides in the doctrines up until this point, it is refreshing that she can review this subject which has divided many Christians. Although it appears (albeit no overtly) that she is writing form a Wesleyan Arminian perspective, her treatment of Calvinism is accurate and thorough. While reviewing both sides of the issue, Christians from both branches – Calvinist and Arminian – will appreciate each other’s theology. Summing up her review: “Calvinists find comfort in a doctrine of God who elects without imposing conditions, Arminians in a doctrine of God who offers salvation to all, and both Calvinists and Arminians in the God whose magnificent and free grace reaches out to us in our helplessness.” In conclusion, Dr. Felker Jones achieves her goal in Practicing Christian Doctrine: An Introduction to Thinking and Living Theologically. Each doctrine is reviewed with care and respect to the historical development and the significant differences among Christian traditions. With that respect, she is able to demonstrate how each doctrine has an essential practical nature. Putting theology into practice means taking critical doctrinal issues and placing responsibility upon the Christian to work them into their spiritual and communal lives. Jesus meant for us to believe rightly and practice the truth of His gospel so that a sick and dying world can hear the good news of His love and grace.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is a simultaneously deep and practical guide to "doing" theology -- loving God and living a life that reflects Christian beliefs. I would commend it highly to anyone, but it would be perfect for a high school or college theology class. It walks through a basic systematic theology that is evangelical, global, and very informed about the history of the Christian traditions. Readers are exposed to great thinkers in the church (past and present) as well as areas where different Christian tradit This is a simultaneously deep and practical guide to "doing" theology -- loving God and living a life that reflects Christian beliefs. I would commend it highly to anyone, but it would be perfect for a high school or college theology class. It walks through a basic systematic theology that is evangelical, global, and very informed about the history of the Christian traditions. Readers are exposed to great thinkers in the church (past and present) as well as areas where different Christian traditions differ, and cautioned by beliefs that resulted in heresy. This book is a gift to the church, and I hope it finds as wide an audience as it deserves.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    As an introduction to evangelical theology that is open to the ecumenical breadth of Christianity past and present, this is not a bad book. But as theology. I struggle to engage it seriously as theology as such, Jones and I are maybe just too different for me to see the book as significant understanding. For instance, it seems to me that: 1. The book is addressed all but exclusively to an audience of evangelicals who speak a certain language. There is very little argument that is genuinely public As an introduction to evangelical theology that is open to the ecumenical breadth of Christianity past and present, this is not a bad book. But as theology. I struggle to engage it seriously as theology as such, Jones and I are maybe just too different for me to see the book as significant understanding. For instance, it seems to me that: 1. The book is addressed all but exclusively to an audience of evangelicals who speak a certain language. There is very little argument that is genuinely public—much more repetitive, doxological self-reinforcement of an evangelical grammar and lexicon often self-expression. 2. That language has to be sealed off from science— ranging from physical cosmology to biologically-based psychology to historical textual criticism. Any of these would flush out the many suppressed inferences (unquestioned assumptions) made in Jones’ doctrinal exposition, and strain them perhaps to breaking point. 3. The approach involves having a tin ear for symbolism and a talent for breathy gushing in place of critical understanding (let alone of post-critical naïveté). There is a great deal of scriptural eisegesis. 4. I’m all for Christians striving to be better people, and I think this book has some potential for that purpose. In that sense, it is theology. Even then, though, the titular conceit, that Christian doctrine is practiced, does not emerge as a clear method or end, but remains often as an occasion for yet more purpled prose in the mode of doxology and exhortation. But—this book is not written for me. If anyone reads this far who can recommend some thing else in evangelical theology, I am open to suggestions.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Audra Spiven

    This book was a great introduction, especially for this first-year seminarian, to the world of theological thought and doctrine. It proceeds pretty much in a linear fashion through the doctrines of Christianity as outlined by the Nicene and Apostles' Creeds, without really saying that that is what it's doing. But proceeding in such a manner is pretty logical, since the creeds naturally provide that progression order. Felker Jones is a great writer and distilled some particular concepts down in a This book was a great introduction, especially for this first-year seminarian, to the world of theological thought and doctrine. It proceeds pretty much in a linear fashion through the doctrines of Christianity as outlined by the Nicene and Apostles' Creeds, without really saying that that is what it's doing. But proceeding in such a manner is pretty logical, since the creeds naturally provide that progression order. Felker Jones is a great writer and distilled some particular concepts down in a way I'd never considered before. I would recommend this to anyone and everyone looking to add a basic but well-written, well-thought-out theological text to their repertoire. It is not a light read, though, so I'd space it out. Since I read this for a class, I read at the pace of one or two chapters per week, according to what was assigned. Took about two months in total to finish.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark Taylor

    ABeth Felker Jones offers a concise and clearly written introduction to theology for undergraduates or interested lay people. She ably covers the standard theological topics. Though I usually feel like sidebars are interruptions, they are purposeful and beneficial in this book; they contain excerpts from primary sources, theologically rich hymns and poems, and extended quotations from scholars who either have had significant influence or whose important majority world perspectives have yet to be ABeth Felker Jones offers a concise and clearly written introduction to theology for undergraduates or interested lay people. She ably covers the standard theological topics. Though I usually feel like sidebars are interruptions, they are purposeful and beneficial in this book; they contain excerpts from primary sources, theologically rich hymns and poems, and extended quotations from scholars who either have had significant influence or whose important majority world perspectives have yet to be appreciated by the Western academy.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Graham

    Focuses on linking doctrinal orthodoxy with orthopraxis. Author writes from a Wesleyan perspective, often citing John and Charles Wesley, though often does provide points of comparison with other traditions, and does so charitably. Included are serveral boxes highlighting key ideas, quotes, biblical texts, which I'm not a fan of- feels a bit like a high school textbook. Overall a helpful book which can provide helpful points of contact between academics and church life. Focuses on linking doctrinal orthodoxy with orthopraxis. Author writes from a Wesleyan perspective, often citing John and Charles Wesley, though often does provide points of comparison with other traditions, and does so charitably. Included are serveral boxes highlighting key ideas, quotes, biblical texts, which I'm not a fan of- feels a bit like a high school textbook. Overall a helpful book which can provide helpful points of contact between academics and church life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jill Bennett

    I highly recommend this book! She clearly describes each doctrinal area, what you need to know under each heading, and how to apply that to your life. Terminology is always explained well, and she even includes quotes, excerpts, and topics from pertinent original sources. I was thrilled to find this book, and I will read all of her books now (it was that good!). Best theology book on the market, by far!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean Dickard

    Great intro to Christian doctrine. Accessible, but shows a decent level of depth as well. I really liked how she always had an eye toward the practical implications of theology, though I think she could have gone into more detail as to how it can be worked out. But, overall, good book and well worth the read!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Luke Stamps

    Good, college-level introduction to Christian theology from an evangelical perspective. Both evangelical and ecumenical, Felker Jones treats intramural evangelical debates in an even handed way. The sidebars with primary source selections (often from female, minority, and global voices) are a welcome feature.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Young

    Jones walks one through Christian doctrine in a way that is easy to understand but also in a way that leads to contemplation. I read this as a textbook and discussing it was very helpful to understand and make her book even more relatable to the Christian faith. She also added thoughts from outside Western theology which was helpful in understanding a small part of the global church.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Bishop

    Good overview of doctrine Though I do not agree with the author on every count, she did a thorough overview of doctrine in the church and covers variations well. I would recommend this book for a better understanding of what we, as Christians believe.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jo Stoy

    A dense, helpful book about several doctrinal issues found in the church/parachutes. Dr. Jones defines key words and heresies interspersed with psalms, hymns, and scriptures. This book attempts to tie Side A (beliefs Christians have) and Side B (Christian ethics) together.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kingue Georges

    A book for you this year. Every theologian has to read this book. By theologian I mean every Christian or believer. Jones writes in a very simple and understandable way and touches all major theological topics.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Harvey

    Excellent! Excellent overview of Christian Theology. Well written and easy to understand. I read this as part of an Introduction to Theology and it really helped me understand some of the most important tenants of my faith.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell Dixon

    This book was fantastic. I would recommend this to anyone wanting to learn more about doctrine. Jones is so generous from so many different traditions and paints a beautiful picture of an ecumenical Christianity.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Don Dunnington

    Very helpful, accessible introduction to basic Christian theology. I am using it as a text in a course titled "Foundations of Christian Belief." Very helpful, accessible introduction to basic Christian theology. I am using it as a text in a course titled "Foundations of Christian Belief."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard Jones

    A great refresher on Christian doctrine; I need this for my mind and my spirit! Thank you Beth!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kenzie Barnett

    Showed a practical approach and explanation, mixed with helpful sources to show the importance of the subject, as well as how to practically apply it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Great Introductory systematic theology. Western evangelical focus with acknowledgment of the broader ecumenical church.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jake Thurston

    A great, accessible text on systematic theology!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    Great book. Makes theology "readable" and understandable. Summarizes a lot of material in a way that is clear and illuminating. Great book. Makes theology "readable" and understandable. Summarizes a lot of material in a way that is clear and illuminating.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Izzy Oliver

    Read for Christian Thought

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...