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The EC Archives: Weird Fantasy Volume 1

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Weird Fantasy Volume 1 touches down at Dark Horse Comics! Fully remastered in magnificent digital color, this otherwordly volume includes twenty-four extraterrestrial tales from a stellar collection of writers and artist - Bill Gaines, Al Feldstein, Harry Harrison, Gardner Fox, Jack Kamen, Harvey Kurtzman, and Wally Wood!


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Weird Fantasy Volume 1 touches down at Dark Horse Comics! Fully remastered in magnificent digital color, this otherwordly volume includes twenty-four extraterrestrial tales from a stellar collection of writers and artist - Bill Gaines, Al Feldstein, Harry Harrison, Gardner Fox, Jack Kamen, Harvey Kurtzman, and Wally Wood!

30 review for The EC Archives: Weird Fantasy Volume 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    ***Dark Horse reprinting of EC Comics, so very Indy!*** This is a gorgeous collection of EC Comics from the early 1950s, published and written by one Bill Gaines...aka Mr. MAD Magazine! Along with some great other writers, Weird Fantasy is actually a Science Fiction book. 1950s Science Ficton from before the Witch hunt against comics leading to juvenile delinquency...a golden age in many ways. There's a number of issues collected here (even though their numbering is off, they are chronologically th ***Dark Horse reprinting of EC Comics, so very Indy!*** This is a gorgeous collection of EC Comics from the early 1950s, published and written by one Bill Gaines...aka Mr. MAD Magazine! Along with some great other writers, Weird Fantasy is actually a Science Fiction book. 1950s Science Ficton from before the Witch hunt against comics leading to juvenile delinquency...a golden age in many ways. There's a number of issues collected here (even though their numbering is off, they are chronologically the first 6 issues) with a great range of stories. Time Travel, Space Exploration, Atomic War, Aliens, Life and Death, lots of great stuff that's been made into movies, some of the coolest ideas that sustained SciFi for the next 65 years. Discussions of String Theory, 4th Dimensions, Gamma, Infrared, Atomic Energy, this isn't just dumb pulp, it's a blast. From the man who builds a time machine (only with the help of his younger self, and the paradox loop that leads to), to the team that flies through space to a different solar system, only to loop back on themselves, a la Planet of the Apes (but this was written long before the Damn Dirty Apes), to the fears of Atomic Nuclear War and the aftermath: mutants, robots, uninhabitable wastelands. This is such fun. This book is the kind of thing you used to love to find, just a bit older than you were supposed to be reading, it felt like some kind of secret they let you in on, and you always wanted more, reading it under the blankets at night by flashlight. (Or at least, I did...) The art is colourful in this reproduction, bright, enjoyable, yet the subject matter is still the kind of questions we wrestle with today... Thank you to Dark Horse for publishing the reprints of this great company, I cannot WAIT to get my hands on more of this. Without this, we wouldn't have the dreamers of comics like Morrison, Hickman, Ellis, others. Heck we might not even have the normal comics we do today. I love the intelligence that goes into something that was throw-away for so many, yet over half a century later, look how relevant the subject matter is. Great writing never ages. I strongly recommend this to all the Shallows Gang, and anyone else looking for a fun read, that you could also share with kids worry free (Anne!)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Man I just love reading an EC collection. Getting to see the great artists and writers at the beginnings of their careers is awesome. These collections are always a great read to me. Recommended

  3. 4 out of 5

    Al Capwned

    Every issue has a specific range of subjects that are the same as a concept and they reflect the troubles of the times they were released (1950-1955) and yes, some of them seem dated by today's standards but overall, the material is quite good. There are stories like "Deadlock" (which is actually the Prisoner's Dilemma IN SPACE), which are really clever and influencial. Every issue has a specific range of subjects that are the same as a concept and they reflect the troubles of the times they were released (1950-1955) and yes, some of them seem dated by today's standards but overall, the material is quite good. There are stories like "Deadlock" (which is actually the Prisoner's Dilemma IN SPACE), which are really clever and influencial.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aussiescribbler Aussiescribbler

    Weird Fantasy was E.C. Comics companion to Weird Science. This book collects the first six issues. There are the expected tales of space exploration, time travel and nuclear war, and then some which go off on other intriguing tangents. There is one story called The Black Arts, written by Harry Harrison and drawn by Harrison and Wally Wood, which seems like it would have fit better in one of E.C. horror titles, dealing as it does with black magic rather than science. Child of Tomorrow, written by Weird Fantasy was E.C. Comics companion to Weird Science. This book collects the first six issues. There are the expected tales of space exploration, time travel and nuclear war, and then some which go off on other intriguing tangents. There is one story called The Black Arts, written by Harry Harrison and drawn by Harrison and Wally Wood, which seems like it would have fit better in one of E.C. horror titles, dealing as it does with black magic rather than science. Child of Tomorrow, written by Bill Gaines and Al Feldstein and drawn by Feldstein stands out as a story which must have been particularly shocking at the time. The contents page credits classic science fiction short stories as the inspiration for some of the stories, including Murray Leinster’s First Contact which inspired Deadlock!, written and drawn by Wally Wood. Five stories by Harvey Kurtzman provide a change of pace as they take a more ironic or satirical approach. I like that the letters pages from each issue are included. It’s interesting to see how readers at the time rated the stories of the previous issue.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Another entry from the world of EC Comics, this time in the Sci-Fi genre. Once again brilliant artwork, especially that of Wally Wood. The stories use many of the same plot devices found in 1950's films; time travel, spaceships, aliens, etc... But they are quite creative for comic books, though often with predictable outcomes. Always fun though to see how the future, often the 1970's and '80's was imagined from a 1950's perspective. Another entry from the world of EC Comics, this time in the Sci-Fi genre. Once again brilliant artwork, especially that of Wally Wood. The stories use many of the same plot devices found in 1950's films; time travel, spaceships, aliens, etc... But they are quite creative for comic books, though often with predictable outcomes. Always fun though to see how the future, often the 1970's and '80's was imagined from a 1950's perspective.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jesús

    Very good reading if you like TV series such as "The outer limits" and the like. Maybe you'll find these stories somewhat naïve or stereotypical, but you must remember that this kind of works were the basis for today's scifi, not the contrary. Very good reading if you like TV series such as "The outer limits" and the like. Maybe you'll find these stories somewhat naïve or stereotypical, but you must remember that this kind of works were the basis for today's scifi, not the contrary.

  7. 4 out of 5

    EA and NE

    Excellent!! A real treat for those of us too young to have ever seen the print version. Thanks Dark horse comics.

  8. 5 out of 5

    MB Taylor

    A fun read. I really enjoy reading good comics from the 50s. I tried the recent reprints of ACG's "Adventures of the Unknown" (e.g. Adventures Into the Unknown Archives Volume 1) but I didn't find the stories very interesting and the art wasn't to my liking. I've really enjoyed The Atlas Era volumes in the Marvel Masterworks series; but I think I've read all that have been published and new ones seem to be coming out less and less frequently. Marvel published 3 in 2012 (including the last of bot A fun read. I really enjoy reading good comics from the 50s. I tried the recent reprints of ACG's "Adventures of the Unknown" (e.g. Adventures Into the Unknown Archives Volume 1) but I didn't find the stories very interesting and the art wasn't to my liking. I've really enjoyed The Atlas Era volumes in the Marvel Masterworks series; but I think I've read all that have been published and new ones seem to be coming out less and less frequently. Marvel published 3 in 2012 (including the last of both Tales of Suspense and Tales to Astonish; 2 in 2013 (and one of those was a Jungle Adventures volume (not my favorites); and I don't thing they've published any yet this year (but there's still over six month's to go so I'm hopeful). Fortunately Dark Horse is picking up the slack, with their excellent reprints of the pre-code EC titles. I used to favor Marvel's post-code books, but I think EC's pre-code books have taken over the top slot. The twisty endings aren't usually a surprise and there are a lot of similar plot lines, but the story telling is solid and enjoyable and the art is very nice. I've heard that some fans don't like the recoloring, but it doesn't bother me (although it would be interesting to compare it with the coloring in original issues). I've enjoyed the previous volumes (published by Gemstone Publishing), but this may be one of my favorites. The stories are more SF the Fantasy oriented but that's fine with me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    Having been reading some of the later EC titles and the later Warren horror magazines, coming back to this point in the art is a bit weird [not a pun!] because it is initially a fair step back in graphic quality and a slight step back in story quality; but once I got in the groove and started seeing how the form was growing at the time then it was informative and entertaining. These are stories about space travel and time travel and weird science that pre-date Sputnik, so some of the science cue Having been reading some of the later EC titles and the later Warren horror magazines, coming back to this point in the art is a bit weird [not a pun!] because it is initially a fair step back in graphic quality and a slight step back in story quality; but once I got in the groove and started seeing how the form was growing at the time then it was informative and entertaining. These are stories about space travel and time travel and weird science that pre-date Sputnik, so some of the science cues and some of the plot set-ups miss their beat, but these stories are ultimately about the characters learning moral lessons so it rarely detracts. In some ways, not caring about a few pesky physical laws helps to structure the very short stories as modern morality plays about the dangers of...well...sometimes science and sometimes ignoring science. The specter of a nuclear war combined with optimistic advances in technology made then-current feelings about men-in-white-coats go a little mixed [see our current take on health science, now, for a similar mix of fear and ecstasy]. For fans of old school SF, proto-Twilight Zone style "gotcha" moments, mildly moralistic humor and heavily moralistic parables, and of comic book art at a time period where it was undergoing much in the way of improvement. Bonus: One story makes use of the Necronomicon, albeit very wrongly, making it possibly the earliest comic reference to it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Doyle

    Compared to other EC collections, this one is not the best. The 4 stories in each issue all revolve around the same three themes: time travel, atomic bombs, and being the last human survivor on Earth. A common third theme was time travelling to the future where atomic bombs had wiped out all of civilization on Earth. The twist ending's were there, but all-in-all the stories seemed more bland than in other EC collections. The art in this volume is also mediocre compared to what EC would publish la Compared to other EC collections, this one is not the best. The 4 stories in each issue all revolve around the same three themes: time travel, atomic bombs, and being the last human survivor on Earth. A common third theme was time travelling to the future where atomic bombs had wiped out all of civilization on Earth. The twist ending's were there, but all-in-all the stories seemed more bland than in other EC collections. The art in this volume is also mediocre compared to what EC would publish later during it's legendary period. Every issue collected in this Archive features Al Feldstein, Jack Kamen and Harvey Kurtzman each doing art chores one story. Incidentally, those are probably 3 of my least liked EC artists. They are all good artists, I just prefer Al Williamson (who makes no appearance in this book). Wally Wood began drawing one story each issue starting with the 4th issue, but this is pretty early in his career and he hadn't quite found his masterful skill yet.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The EC crew hadn't hit their stride, creatively, at this point, but there are still a couple standouts - the talking heads in Feldstein/Gaines/Kamen's "...And Then There Were Two!" could've been lifted from nearly any of today's 24-hour news networks. Talk about prescience. The art is solid, but each of these young artists would reach greater heights in the next few years on this and other EC titles. Dark Horse did a fine job with the reproduction. I'm very happy to see the EC Archives line conti The EC crew hadn't hit their stride, creatively, at this point, but there are still a couple standouts - the talking heads in Feldstein/Gaines/Kamen's "...And Then There Were Two!" could've been lifted from nearly any of today's 24-hour news networks. Talk about prescience. The art is solid, but each of these young artists would reach greater heights in the next few years on this and other EC titles. Dark Horse did a fine job with the reproduction. I'm very happy to see the EC Archives line continuing with them.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Russell Grant

    Tales From The Crypt is what brought me to EC Comics but I can't help but feel that the Sci-Fi mags are the best thing they did. This one is from the beginning so there are a lot of "end of the earth" style action pieces, but they are still really clever. You also get a good dose of satire from Harvey Kurtzman in this collection. So yeah, if you like EC comics, this is a must. Dark Horse taking over the reigns is a boon too as the presentation continues to be really nice and there's actually a ch Tales From The Crypt is what brought me to EC Comics but I can't help but feel that the Sci-Fi mags are the best thing they did. This one is from the beginning so there are a lot of "end of the earth" style action pieces, but they are still really clever. You also get a good dose of satire from Harvey Kurtzman in this collection. So yeah, if you like EC comics, this is a must. Dark Horse taking over the reigns is a boon too as the presentation continues to be really nice and there's actually a chance we will see a complete set.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sylvester

    I liked how there was a lot of input into creating these stories to make them as probable as possible. Weird Fantasy Volume 1 is really just another Weird Science.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    Excellent collection of the first six issues of Weird Fantasy, which is actually pulp science fiction. Really cool to see the roots of the genre!

  15. 5 out of 5

    wildct2003

    Read a couple of stories; in full color

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Craft

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cory Hubbell

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark NP

  19. 5 out of 5

    Xaanua

  20. 4 out of 5

    Graham

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Carlson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Budhaditya Mazumdar

  24. 5 out of 5

    John

  25. 4 out of 5

    Florianosaure

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jason Holland

  28. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Chang

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jay Kenyon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Goss

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