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Under Saturn's Shadow: The Wounding and Healing of Men

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Saturn was the infamous Roman god who ate his children in an attempt to stop them from usurping his power. Men throughout history have been psychologically and spiritually burdened by the Saturnian legacy, suffering from the corruption of empowerment, driven by their fear of women and other men, and wounding themselves and others. These and many other issues are addressed, Saturn was the infamous Roman god who ate his children in an attempt to stop them from usurping his power. Men throughout history have been psychologically and spiritually burdened by the Saturnian legacy, suffering from the corruption of empowerment, driven by their fear of women and other men, and wounding themselves and others. These and many other issues are addressed, suggesting concrete ways in which men may reclaim their sense of personal integrity.


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Saturn was the infamous Roman god who ate his children in an attempt to stop them from usurping his power. Men throughout history have been psychologically and spiritually burdened by the Saturnian legacy, suffering from the corruption of empowerment, driven by their fear of women and other men, and wounding themselves and others. These and many other issues are addressed, Saturn was the infamous Roman god who ate his children in an attempt to stop them from usurping his power. Men throughout history have been psychologically and spiritually burdened by the Saturnian legacy, suffering from the corruption of empowerment, driven by their fear of women and other men, and wounding themselves and others. These and many other issues are addressed, suggesting concrete ways in which men may reclaim their sense of personal integrity.

30 review for Under Saturn's Shadow: The Wounding and Healing of Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Marshall

    Most men are under-fathered and over-mothered, that's the conclusion of Jungian Analyst James Hollis. I have read many of his books and they always have some profound ideas. At the heart of this one is that men give the women in their lives the responsibility for their emotional welfare (because they have not completely left the shelter of their mother's hearth) and their fathers have not taught them the secrets of being a true man - beyond playing the narrow set of socially acceptable roles of Most men are under-fathered and over-mothered, that's the conclusion of Jungian Analyst James Hollis. I have read many of his books and they always have some profound ideas. At the heart of this one is that men give the women in their lives the responsibility for their emotional welfare (because they have not completely left the shelter of their mother's hearth) and their fathers have not taught them the secrets of being a true man - beyond playing the narrow set of socially acceptable roles of provider and defender. The book has the eight secrets about men (which most men don't know or deny their truth) and seven steps to healing. I use it a lot with clients and I've yet to meet a man who does not find something in it profound. Here's just one of the notes that I took: most men's greatest fear is not death but not having truly lived their life. This book can help you start that journey of self-discovery.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pilgrim_girl

    A sibling book to 'Women who run with the wolves' by Clarissa Estes. It is very nice to read about problems or qualities that are attributed to one sex only. Both of them make brief apology somewhere in the beginning saying that the opposite sex might be in the same boat provided circumstances are similar. After that both continue talking about their favorite. But if you read both books together you might get some kind of a very peculiar 'stereo effect' =) And a bit of a quote: 'The Eight Secrets A sibling book to 'Women who run with the wolves' by Clarissa Estes. It is very nice to read about problems or qualities that are attributed to one sex only. Both of them make brief apology somewhere in the beginning saying that the opposite sex might be in the same boat provided circumstances are similar. After that both continue talking about their favorite. But if you read both books together you might get some kind of a very peculiar 'stereo effect' =) And a bit of a quote: 'The Eight Secrets Men Carry Within 1. Men's lives are as much governed by restrictive role expectations as are the lives of women. 2. Men's lives are essentially governed by fear. 3. The power of the feminine is immense in the psychic economy of men. 4. Men collude in a conspiracy of silence whose aim is to suppress their emotional truth. 5. Because men must leave Mother, and transcend the mother complex, wounding is necessary. 6. Men's lives are violent because their souls have been violated. 7. Every man carries a deep longing for his father and for his tribal Fathers. 8. If men are to heal, they must activate within what they did not receive from without.' Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Behrouz

    The book is a must read for all men, and is recommended for everyone. It sheds light to the common sufferings of all men and inner works need to be done for that. The only problem with the book is the relatively hard language that James Hollis chose to right the book on.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shavawn Berry

    James Hollis's book, Under Saturn's Shadow: The Wounding and Healing of Men, is a must-read for both men and women who want to understand the shadow aspect of their relationships. Hollis traces the roots of men's fear in this book that uses depth psychology, dreams, anecdotes from Hollis's analysands, and symbolism to unpack the grief, wounding, and sorrow that men face due to a lack of male mentors and rites of passage to help them navigate adulthood. Because women have an easier time acknowled James Hollis's book, Under Saturn's Shadow: The Wounding and Healing of Men, is a must-read for both men and women who want to understand the shadow aspect of their relationships. Hollis traces the roots of men's fear in this book that uses depth psychology, dreams, anecdotes from Hollis's analysands, and symbolism to unpack the grief, wounding, and sorrow that men face due to a lack of male mentors and rites of passage to help them navigate adulthood. Because women have an easier time acknowledging their emotions, they are more likely to acknowledge and work on their shadows. Men -- according to Hollis -- are more likely to shut down in the face of tremendous grief or loss, rather than mine it for what it can teach them. His contention is that all men are wounded in one way or another. This is a beautiful book in that it offers those wounded men a way out of the wilderness of their pain. It helped me to understand several of the men in my life better, and for that I am truly grateful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Read this PDF on my laptop the past week, which has offered, undoubtedly, the most complex thinking from any book I've read this year. It is based on Jungian Psychology about man (males) + the relationship with society's expectations' values, inner self, and connection with the true path. It is written incredibly well and filled with quotable passages and bathroom sticky note decor, left and right. Being 23 and undergoing some of the transformational phases of adulthood, this book seemed to find Read this PDF on my laptop the past week, which has offered, undoubtedly, the most complex thinking from any book I've read this year. It is based on Jungian Psychology about man (males) + the relationship with society's expectations' values, inner self, and connection with the true path. It is written incredibly well and filled with quotable passages and bathroom sticky note decor, left and right. Being 23 and undergoing some of the transformational phases of adulthood, this book seemed to find me at the right time and offer an abundance of questions to contemplate. I viewed this read more as morning studying than enjoyment, but was filled with wonder throughout. Highly recommend to anyone, even women, who have an urge to learn more about the struggles and questions that man faces throughout the span of life - and the great possibilities of being aware and overcoming these. "Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves. Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given to you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is, to live everything. Live the questions now. Perhaps then you will gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer "

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    An excellent book for men to better understand their struggles and for the women who care about men. I recommend this book to male patients and encourage them to apply its principles to their lives. Hollis quotes Jung about the "too-small life" being the cause of much unhappiness: "I have frequently seen people become neurotic when they content themselves with inadequate or wrong answers to the questions of life. They seek position, marriage, reputation, outward success or money, and remain unhap An excellent book for men to better understand their struggles and for the women who care about men. I recommend this book to male patients and encourage them to apply its principles to their lives. Hollis quotes Jung about the "too-small life" being the cause of much unhappiness: "I have frequently seen people become neurotic when they content themselves with inadequate or wrong answers to the questions of life. They seek position, marriage, reputation, outward success or money, and remain unhappy and neurotic even when they have attained what they were seeking. Such people are usually confined within too narrow a spiritual horizon. Their life has not sufficient content, sufficient meaning. If they are enabled to develop into more spacious personalities, the neurosis generally disappears." (Memories, Dreams, Reflectionsw, p. 140). May we all, male or female, live the spaciousness of our lives fully.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eugene

    when a boy transforms into a man internally? why some are not transforming. Lot of questions answered in this book

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeri Rowe

    It must've been three years ago when I bought "Under Saturn's Shadow." It came recommended by a therapist I was seeing. I'll call him Gene. I saw Gene nearly every week for at least 15 months, and he helped me immensely. He helped me repair my marriage and make me see -- and understand -- what had been unseen and barely understood my whole life. As for "Under Saturn's Shadow," though, I kept it on my bookshelf. I'd see the cover, and I'd be reminded of that precarious time in my life when I felt It must've been three years ago when I bought "Under Saturn's Shadow." It came recommended by a therapist I was seeing. I'll call him Gene. I saw Gene nearly every week for at least 15 months, and he helped me immensely. He helped me repair my marriage and make me see -- and understand -- what had been unseen and barely understood my whole life. As for "Under Saturn's Shadow," though, I kept it on my bookshelf. I'd see the cover, and I'd be reminded of that precarious time in my life when I felt everything I cared about was slipping through my fingers. This past weekend, though, I picked it up. Life was better, I was better, I was in between books, and I felt it was time face what I feared. I'm glad I did. James Hollis' "Under Saturn's Shadow" is full of OMG moments because I see myself in its pages. I see what I was, and I saw what I'm working to be. And as I read, I kept hearing Gene's voice in my head. I can see why he recommended I read Hollis' book. I kept a pencil and Post-its at my elbow while I read because I knew I would go back to "Under Saturn's Shadow" time and again for reference and reinvigoration. Many passages grabbed me. Here are two: "Our mythology is full of heroic adventures -- mountains climbed, ogres fought, dragons defeated -- but it takes even more courage for a man to speak his emotional truths. The hero quest today is not through the physical world but through the badlands of the soul." "Most men use their job to validate themselves, but they do not feel valued even when they haev achieved success. They use work to validate their identity when they have not done the work of individuation. As Albert Camus noted, "Without work, all life goes rotten. But when work is soulless, life stifles and dies.' While we cannot ignore economic realities, we must also ensure that our work give meaning and substance to our lives. It is necessary for men to decide anew, then, who they are and how they will spend their precious energy." Hollis' book came out in 1994. Do the math. That's a long time ago. But what you'll find in his 135 pages is pretty timeless, incredibly helpful. And if you're a man at any age working to answer the emotional questions in your life, "Under Saturn's Shadow" will show that you are far from alone. He will give you tips on how to answer those questions and how you can feel more whole.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Drick

    Drawing on Jungian psychology, particularly his concepts of anima and animus, Hollis talks about the woundedness of men in relationship to the lasting impact of their father and mother. He offers his perspective on why men tend to be competitive to a fault, to hold in emotions, often feel depressed despite outward success, and the controlling and even abuse of women. As I read this book I found myself identifying with parts of it, and not connecting with other parts. On the other hand, I thought Drawing on Jungian psychology, particularly his concepts of anima and animus, Hollis talks about the woundedness of men in relationship to the lasting impact of their father and mother. He offers his perspective on why men tend to be competitive to a fault, to hold in emotions, often feel depressed despite outward success, and the controlling and even abuse of women. As I read this book I found myself identifying with parts of it, and not connecting with other parts. On the other hand, I thought of many men who displayed some if not all the characteristics and behaviors he describes. Hollis is to be commended for raising up the fact that men are wounded as are women by some of our dominant cultural paradigms.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    This book really got me thinking about men's lives and what's missing. Several things stuck with me, for example, the rites of passage and what they all had in common in tribal societies. The author shared his own experience with football and compared that to ritual scarring. It really spoke to my own experience with MMA. I also liked that the internal battles were respected more than the external battles. And I find myself agreeing with his point-of-view that political movements aren't nearly as This book really got me thinking about men's lives and what's missing. Several things stuck with me, for example, the rites of passage and what they all had in common in tribal societies. The author shared his own experience with football and compared that to ritual scarring. It really spoke to my own experience with MMA. I also liked that the internal battles were respected more than the external battles. And I find myself agreeing with his point-of-view that political movements aren't nearly as important as inner work and outer honesty.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Zeitounlian

    Albeit short, this book took me a while to read. That was because of two reasons. 1) The book is short: the author does not expand much on the main points. So you do have to read carefully. 2) I found myself constantly pausing, book in hand, to stare at the horizon and reflect upon my life. Hollis explains how our society created fixed roles for men and women, and women began to question these roles in the last decades. They found roles models, fought for their rights and, although there is much to Albeit short, this book took me a while to read. That was because of two reasons. 1) The book is short: the author does not expand much on the main points. So you do have to read carefully. 2) I found myself constantly pausing, book in hand, to stare at the horizon and reflect upon my life. Hollis explains how our society created fixed roles for men and women, and women began to question these roles in the last decades. They found roles models, fought for their rights and, although there is much to be done, their fight is on. Good for them. But men are at a loss. We lost our rites of passage. We are bereft of role models, have been taught to repress our emotions and our true selves, and, worst of all, we are unaware of all this. We end up wounding others and ourselves in this process - and burying ourselves in an intense pursuit of work, sex, alcohol, drugs, power... what have you. And note: there is nothing inherently wrong with any of those. But many men are using them to numb themselves. The result is that we end up living a life unfulfilled, leaving our true selves on the table, and never realizing our true potential. This is not a book about the "male movement" or anything like that. It is a book about personal transformation. About facing your fears. And about bringing to consciousness some issues - so that you can work on them. What I liked the most about the book is that the author realizes this is a systemic issue: a consequence of our current society. But, at the same time, he does not get on a soapbox and try to preach or invent policies. Instead, he acknowledges that this is a personal journey, and quotes Jung in why the transformation must begin with each of us. "Such a man knows that whatever is wrong in the world is in himself, and if he only learns to deal with his own shadow he has done something real for the world. He has succeeded in shouldering at least an infinitesimal part of the gigantic, unsolved social problems of our day. These problems are mostly so difficult because they are poisoned by mutual projections. How can anyone see straight when he does not even see himself and the darkness he unconsciously carries with him into all his dealings?” This is a great book, and I believe any man interested in self-development, emotional balance, and happiness would find some value in reading it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Steve Ellerhoff

    Valuable thoughts here on the wounds men live with, with some ideas on how to heal those and get on with it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Larkin Tackett

    This book popped up in an interview of author Neil Strauss in Tim Ferriss' Tribe of Mentors and we're reading it in the neighborhood Man's Book club. An academic, psychologist, and acolyte of Carl Jung, the author James Hollis writes, "Men's lives are as much governed by role expectations as are the lives of women. And the corollary is that those roles do not support, confirm, or resonate to the needs of men's souls." Although none of the arguments are new and I don't totally buy the level of em This book popped up in an interview of author Neil Strauss in Tim Ferriss' Tribe of Mentors and we're reading it in the neighborhood Man's Book club. An academic, psychologist, and acolyte of Carl Jung, the author James Hollis writes, "Men's lives are as much governed by role expectations as are the lives of women. And the corollary is that those roles do not support, confirm, or resonate to the needs of men's souls." Although none of the arguments are new and I don't totally buy the level of emphasis Ellis and other Jungian thinkers put on the subconscious and archetypal power relationship between a child and their mother and father, the book is an indictment of men as a sex. Not only do we die earlier, commit crimes, and abuse drugs at much higher rates than women, we don't deal with our emotions nearly as well (which are not surprisingly related). We do need a man's movement in this #metoo moment and this book raises a number of questions to help us get started.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    This is a hard read, to be sure. My first introduction to Jungian Psychology, I picked up this book for self-improvement. I wanted to get a greater understanding of myself and how our culture has shaped my mind to work - and this book definitely gave me the window I was looking for. I had to re-read paragraphs many times - sometimes to be sure I understood, sometimes because it is often so deep that even the slightest disruption could make me lose the thread I was following and need to start the This is a hard read, to be sure. My first introduction to Jungian Psychology, I picked up this book for self-improvement. I wanted to get a greater understanding of myself and how our culture has shaped my mind to work - and this book definitely gave me the window I was looking for. I had to re-read paragraphs many times - sometimes to be sure I understood, sometimes because it is often so deep that even the slightest disruption could make me lose the thread I was following and need to start the section over. Occasionally I would have to pause to look something up, but mostly I followed without greater issue than already mentioned. Just once at the very end I had to stop and re-read a line of text because it was so out of character with the rest of Hollis' writings that I couldn't quite believe it. All in all, I'm glad I read this short book but I'm not primed to dive into the world of Jungian Psychology just yet.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Long

    I found this an amazing and powerful book, that speaks directly to the challenges of being a male in our modern, industrialized world. Certainly it spoke strongly to me. I'd love to say "everyone - well - at least men" should read this book, but certainly see how it might be daunting for someone being exposed to Jung's ideas for the first time, since it assumes that a fair number of words/concepts are understood. If you a man, and familiar with Jung's ideas, I'd say it's a must read. If you're not I found this an amazing and powerful book, that speaks directly to the challenges of being a male in our modern, industrialized world. Certainly it spoke strongly to me. I'd love to say "everyone - well - at least men" should read this book, but certainly see how it might be daunting for someone being exposed to Jung's ideas for the first time, since it assumes that a fair number of words/concepts are understood. If you a man, and familiar with Jung's ideas, I'd say it's a must read. If you're not familiar with Jung, there are better place to start.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Levin

    In 2005 I was introduced to Wild at Heart, which was the first time I had heard the term "wounding of men." I didn't relate to that well, as I was not super outdoorsy, and didn't have much takeaway from it. Fast forward to 2019, I was lent this gem, which I had never heard of, while I was taking a few days of silent retreat. Everything about the topic of wounding and healing in men is presented much better in this book. I recommend every man to read this, and maybe even a second read. In 2005 I was introduced to Wild at Heart, which was the first time I had heard the term "wounding of men." I didn't relate to that well, as I was not super outdoorsy, and didn't have much takeaway from it. Fast forward to 2019, I was lent this gem, which I had never heard of, while I was taking a few days of silent retreat. Everything about the topic of wounding and healing in men is presented much better in this book. I recommend every man to read this, and maybe even a second read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    JP

    Why are some people special?  Why are some books? because, they always stay close and give useful thoughts and help to voyage our life smoothly. It's about men and their archetype towards this world.  How much his mother complex disturbs him in his personal life. No book would discuss this dimension too precisely. I learned so many things in this book, and may put into practice if it's formed like a habit. Lovely book! Why are some people special?  Why are some books? because, they always stay close and give useful thoughts and help to voyage our life smoothly. It's about men and their archetype towards this world.  How much his mother complex disturbs him in his personal life. No book would discuss this dimension too precisely. I learned so many things in this book, and may put into practice if it's formed like a habit. Lovely book!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kolya Kalinin

    This book covers a very important problem of the modern man. Suppressing his own femininity, following gender stereotypes, stupid labeling, - because of this, a man suffers. There are a lot of empty words in the book. But it is definitely worth reading, if only because of the last chapter calling for revolution of mind.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Eifert

    Really good book on the struggles of men in modern times. The book references m the Men's Movement and Robert Bly, etc., but stands outside that movement. If you're interested in Jungian Theory and masculinity, then you will find this book worth reading. Really good book on the struggles of men in modern times. The book references m the Men's Movement and Robert Bly, etc., but stands outside that movement. If you're interested in Jungian Theory and masculinity, then you will find this book worth reading.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim Sotoadeh

    This is a book that I read at exactly the right time in my life. I had to stop every 2 or 3 pages to take a deep breath because of how much Truth there is in here. I recommend every man who's interested in looking into their soul and discovering the Truth within them to read this. This is a book that I read at exactly the right time in my life. I had to stop every 2 or 3 pages to take a deep breath because of how much Truth there is in here. I recommend every man who's interested in looking into their soul and discovering the Truth within them to read this.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisbeth Solberg

    Liked the literary quotes better than the main text. Became impatient with repetitive style. Discussion with bookies was interesting but lacked a male perspective.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrei

    This book has many perspicacious observations about male psychology, peppered with beautiful poetic expressions and fascinating details. There were many moments where I recognized parts of myself which made it an interesting read. However, I found myself struggling with both its style and content. It's repetitive: he reiterates his thesis, quite incessantly, to the point where I lost my patience, and when it came to practical advice, I was left frustrated by its explicitly vague nature: "But alwa This book has many perspicacious observations about male psychology, peppered with beautiful poetic expressions and fascinating details. There were many moments where I recognized parts of myself which made it an interesting read. However, I found myself struggling with both its style and content. It's repetitive: he reiterates his thesis, quite incessantly, to the point where I lost my patience, and when it came to practical advice, I was left frustrated by its explicitly vague nature: "But always, whenever healing occurs, it is due to a transpersonal, mysterious agency, experienced as grace." This makes me wince, and there's a sugary atmosphere to the writing which I personally dislike. His idea that the only reason people misbehave, or seek power over others, is because they were raised wrong, that violence only comes from weakness, seems unrealistic to me. I don't imagine surplus-killer predators with strict dominance hierarchies behave the way they do because they have a complicated relationship to their mother. Surely bad parenting is a scourge, but the shining Buddha-minds which he aims for seem to only function via mysterious forces. There's also a hagiography of marginal cultures which I find suspicious. For example, he offers this fascinating detail: "One looks with horror at his paintings of the Mandan Sioux initiatory rites. A skewer was driven into the pectoral muscles of the initiate and he was raised by rope from those hooks toward the ceiling of the ceremonial lodge. He was swung around, hanging from the hooks in his breast, until he fainted. Then he was lowered to the ground and when he recovered he placed a finger on a buffalo skull, the digit to be severed as a further sacrifice." This is super cool as a curiosity, but he makes the questionable assumption that cruelty played no part in this, that its *apparent* cruelty is strictly necessary to make the mysterious archetypal healing energy spring forth, which they arrived at by some sort of magic. I'm not convinced that it's anything more than one of many bungled attempts at trying to form a society; a society/culture which is not exactly thriving, I might add. I also get the impression he wants to have his cake and eat it too. For example, he glorifies strength and heroism, using mythological stories to explain that you can't throw yourself a pity party, that you gotta go out there and fight. I'm on board. But then he'll also flip that around and talk about how pitiful it is that men are holding back their pain, how the patriarchy sucks, how men use external means to salve their wounds, and how they won't find inner peace that way. It would be nice if men could be totally attuned to their emotions, willing to express them, and also able to cut them off in service of their families and communities, and also able to take care of their own needs, and also protect their family, and also not be pressured to be a strong-man. This would all be nice, but he himself admits that his profession offers little more than talk on this matter: "As constructive and supportive as therapy may be, it does not involve ritual burial and rebirth, or swinging from the pectorals. No ecstatic vision, only talk. Such talk is necessary, and healing, but it also takes longer." I didn't come away feeling a lot of confidence in the power of these rituals or visions. He wraps the book up with a good pep talk: A man still is obliged to fulfill his commitments to others, to meet his responsibilities. Yet he has an inescapable calling to individuation. If he forgets that calling, squanders his brief moment on earth, he is a problem to those others anyhow. To live the journey of the soul is to serve nature, to serve others and to serve that mystery of which we are the experiment. Do what you gotta do, but, also don't get too caught up in that...?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Suhrob

    What I really enjoyed: - Hollis seems like a nice guy with his heart in the right place - The writing is deeply seated in (western) mythology and poetry - all the quotes and allusions were a great pleasure. - I *think* I agree with the symptomatics. I don't know if it is complete, but sounds plausible What I really not enjoyed: - there are essentially no solutions here - Hollis himself seem quite bearish on therapy (he says it is very valuable, and very ineffective - not in these words) - several time What I really enjoyed: - Hollis seems like a nice guy with his heart in the right place - The writing is deeply seated in (western) mythology and poetry - all the quotes and allusions were a great pleasure. - I *think* I agree with the symptomatics. I don't know if it is complete, but sounds plausible What I really not enjoyed: - there are essentially no solutions here - Hollis himself seem quite bearish on therapy (he says it is very valuable, and very ineffective - not in these words) - several times he recounts dreams by clients 12+ months of therapy apart with next two no shift/improvement (?)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tom Evans

    Much wisdom is contained in here, and generous sharing of his experience, personal and professional. A cumbersome start (it has aged somewhat) built up to a confronting and deeply challenging series of questions to ask myself as a man...son, and father. The urgent call to speak truth rang true, but how to do it with love, authenticity and, say, a fierce compassion was somewhat clunky. Or maybe a book can only do so much and it's time to book an appointment, ha! Much wisdom is contained in here, and generous sharing of his experience, personal and professional. A cumbersome start (it has aged somewhat) built up to a confronting and deeply challenging series of questions to ask myself as a man...son, and father. The urgent call to speak truth rang true, but how to do it with love, authenticity and, say, a fierce compassion was somewhat clunky. Or maybe a book can only do so much and it's time to book an appointment, ha!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Troy Powell

    A thought-provoking exploration of toxic/restrictive masculinity from a Jungian perspective. A brave insight into some of the patterns and consequence of this "Saturnian Shadow" with a clear guide on what we can do to heal these wounds. This was my second James Hollis book and I am so happy that I read it. A thought-provoking exploration of toxic/restrictive masculinity from a Jungian perspective. A brave insight into some of the patterns and consequence of this "Saturnian Shadow" with a clear guide on what we can do to heal these wounds. This was my second James Hollis book and I am so happy that I read it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike Huizinga

    Highly recommended read for any man. It makes you aware of the pitfalls of current society and their impact on men. Moreover, it encourages and inspires you to overcome the mother complex and father complex for yourself and the generations to come. To truly live your own life as an independent human being and face any obstacles along the way with dignity and gratitude.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tobias Volkmann

    life changing for me If you're a man and feeling a little lost at times wondering why you are doing what you are doing and maybe also wondering what you should do to be satisfied with life this is a book to read for sure. life changing for me If you're a man and feeling a little lost at times wondering why you are doing what you are doing and maybe also wondering what you should do to be satisfied with life this is a book to read for sure.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yavor Yanakiev

    A very difficult read. Great knowledge and insights but it's written as if you're a psychology major and should be able to understand a lot of terminology. If you force yourself through that, though, and are able to focus on the substance instead - there's some really good nuggets of info there. A very difficult read. Great knowledge and insights but it's written as if you're a psychology major and should be able to understand a lot of terminology. If you force yourself through that, though, and are able to focus on the substance instead - there's some really good nuggets of info there.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bogdan Oleksyshyn

    One of the best book for man growing

  30. 5 out of 5

    George Saakiants

    Eye opening book on the mission of a man in life..

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