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Ten Women

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“Listening to stories gives you many lives, telling them dims loneliness.” —Marcela SerranoNine Chilean women with divergent life stories - from a teenaged lesbian struggling to find acceptance to a woman confronting the loneliness of old age - come together to talk about their triumphs and heartaches. They all have one person in common, their beloved therapist Natasha who “Listening to stories gives you many lives, telling them dims loneliness.” —Marcela SerranoNine Chilean women with divergent life stories - from a teenaged lesbian struggling to find acceptance to a woman confronting the loneliness of old age - come together to talk about their triumphs and heartaches. They all have one person in common, their beloved therapist Natasha who, though central to the lives of all of the women, is absent from their meeting. The women represent the many cultural and social groups that modern Chile is comprised of—from a housekeeper to celebrity television personality. They are of disparate ages and races and their lives have been touched by major political events from the dictatorship of Pinochet to the Israel-Palestine conflict. But despite their differences, as the women tell their stories, unlikely bonds are formed, and their lives are transformed in this intricately woven, beautifully rendered tale of the universal bonds between women from one of Latin America’s most celebrated novelists.


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“Listening to stories gives you many lives, telling them dims loneliness.” —Marcela SerranoNine Chilean women with divergent life stories - from a teenaged lesbian struggling to find acceptance to a woman confronting the loneliness of old age - come together to talk about their triumphs and heartaches. They all have one person in common, their beloved therapist Natasha who “Listening to stories gives you many lives, telling them dims loneliness.” —Marcela SerranoNine Chilean women with divergent life stories - from a teenaged lesbian struggling to find acceptance to a woman confronting the loneliness of old age - come together to talk about their triumphs and heartaches. They all have one person in common, their beloved therapist Natasha who, though central to the lives of all of the women, is absent from their meeting. The women represent the many cultural and social groups that modern Chile is comprised of—from a housekeeper to celebrity television personality. They are of disparate ages and races and their lives have been touched by major political events from the dictatorship of Pinochet to the Israel-Palestine conflict. But despite their differences, as the women tell their stories, unlikely bonds are formed, and their lives are transformed in this intricately woven, beautifully rendered tale of the universal bonds between women from one of Latin America’s most celebrated novelists.

30 review for Ten Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Always Pouting

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A book that follows along as nine patients of a psychiatrist all meet to tell their stories to one another followed by the story of the psychiatrist herself. I read the other reviews and I see other people also weren't as sure with the format. I think one person mentioned that it's a series of monologues. That's all quite true. I don't think I hated the structure of this, but I do think the way everything is mostly disconnected didn't work out. Mostly because the book wraps up with the psychiatr A book that follows along as nine patients of a psychiatrist all meet to tell their stories to one another followed by the story of the psychiatrist herself. I read the other reviews and I see other people also weren't as sure with the format. I think one person mentioned that it's a series of monologues. That's all quite true. I don't think I hated the structure of this, but I do think the way everything is mostly disconnected didn't work out. Mostly because the book wraps up with the psychiatrist's story at the end as told by her assistant and it feels like there wasn't any resolution or clarity to what the purpose of the meeting had been. The lack of interactions between patients and this abrupt announcement at the end that the psychiatrist was going to be taking a leave just made it all feel disjointed at the end. Also I was kind of confused when reading because it says at one point "Natasha never saw her again" and it was unclear whether the author meant Marlene or Hanna. I assumed it was Hanna but then Natasha finds Hanna and so I was like what? The book was interesting though, I don't know as much about South America, let alone Chile and did want to know more about what it was like there. I really liked reading the accounts of the lives of women in Chile and the way their experiences were common to the experiences had by anyone anywhere. That was the most appealing aspect of this for me. The stories themselves were compelling as well but I do think some were better than others, which tends to happen when you have disparate parts like this. Overall an enjoyable read, regardless of the fact that it felt disjointed.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    Marcela Serrano is a well-known writer in Chile, but Ten Women is the first of her books to be translated into English. The concept underlying the book is straightforward: nine women, all clients (some paying, some pro bono) of the same psychologist come together to tell their stories to one another. After the nine speak, an assistant to the psychologist tells the psychologist’s story as well. These chapters are framed by very brief opening and closing vignettes describing the psychologist viewi Marcela Serrano is a well-known writer in Chile, but Ten Women is the first of her books to be translated into English. The concept underlying the book is straightforward: nine women, all clients (some paying, some pro bono) of the same psychologist come together to tell their stories to one another. After the nine speak, an assistant to the psychologist tells the psychologist’s story as well. These chapters are framed by very brief opening and closing vignettes describing the psychologist viewing the women at a distance as they arrive for this group session. I wanted very much to love this book. I’m particularly interested in literature from post-Pinochet Chile, and the idea of such a multiplicity of narrative voices was tantalizing. I wanted to love this book. But I didn’t. I’m not sorry I read it. I learned from it. But that act of reading was rather like eating a large serving of Swiss chard: I knew it was good for me, but the experience wasn’t intrinsically rewarding. The women in Ten Women represent a broad range of classes, ages, and life experiences, including a young lesbian; the wife of a man who was “disappeared” during the Pinochet regime; a well-known television host; a poor woman struggling to provide not only for herself, but for her bipolar daughter and disabled mother as well. Unfortunately—and I don’t know if this is a characteristic of the original or a result of the translation—these voices come across in a sort of monotone, difficult to differentiate from one another. The structure Serrano uses, while interesting in concept, is part of the problem here. The book is essentially ten monologues with almost no cross reference. Each woman speaks about herself, but we hear only her voice as she speaks. There’s no exchange of words among characters. In addition, we’re not offered visuals of the group or the room in which they’re meeting, so our experience is abstract. We get no interplay of voices, no facial expressions or body language. The distance inherent in the monologues becomes most perplexing when the story of Natasha, the psychologist, is told by Natasha’s assistant. Natasha’s story is interesting, but doesn’t explain why she hasn’t met with the group herself or why she’s decided that this indirect form of self-revelation is appropriate in this therapeutic setting. One learns about the details of daily life for women in contemporary Chile: the expectations and opportunities that are largely regulated by class. However, since we can’t really connect with these too-similar-despite-their-differences women emotionally and since the novel as a whole lacks any narrative arc, what we get is a set of details that could have been communicated with equal efficiency in a shorter work of sociological non-fiction. If you’re interested in understanding some of the variety of contemporary Chileña experience, read this book. However, if you’re hoping to build relationships with characters and to travel along beside them you’ll be disappointed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    This book caught my attention and kept it throughout. Each chapter is a story told by a different woman from Chile. They are young, they are older, they are single, they are wed, they are rich and they are poor, they come from all walks of life, and each one has a story to tell. The only thing these women have in common is their wonderful therapist, Natalie. Natalie brings them all together and lets each one shine. Most believe they have no story worth telling - they are just "average" women gett This book caught my attention and kept it throughout. Each chapter is a story told by a different woman from Chile. They are young, they are older, they are single, they are wed, they are rich and they are poor, they come from all walks of life, and each one has a story to tell. The only thing these women have in common is their wonderful therapist, Natalie. Natalie brings them all together and lets each one shine. Most believe they have no story worth telling - they are just "average" women getting on with their lives. Fortunately, as each one begins to tell their history, a wonderful - if sometimes sad - story results. As I read each chapter, although it would seem I had little in common with either the rich, pampered woman or the woman fighting to survive in the deepest holes of poverty, it turns out I did. All women share some of the same characteristics. In short, I loved this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    H.A. Leuschel

    This is a beautiful novel that gives a voice to nine Chilean women from vastly different backgrounds who each have a deep hurt to live with and that has caused them to seek out therapy at different stages of their lives. They are brought together by their therapist, Natasha, which gives each of the women the opportunity to talk about their lives and share the burden of the past together. I was moved about how many of the women's stories I could relate to and that there are aspects of a woman's l This is a beautiful novel that gives a voice to nine Chilean women from vastly different backgrounds who each have a deep hurt to live with and that has caused them to seek out therapy at different stages of their lives. They are brought together by their therapist, Natasha, which gives each of the women the opportunity to talk about their lives and share the burden of the past together. I was moved about how many of the women's stories I could relate to and that there are aspects of a woman's life we can all empathize and understand. The style of writing is fluid, honest and straight to the point. There are no embellishments for the descriptions of much of the hardship endured by many of the narrators and I thought that was important in order to convey their courage to face life's challenges. A poignant and original read!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Siria

    In this short novel, Marcela Serrano introduces us to nine women and their therapist. Of varying ages and social backgrounds, all are from Chile and all are dealing with some kind of pain and heartache. Serrano shows a real mastery of voice here—each woman sounds distinct, and believably the product of her own circumstances. She is however clearly less interested in plot or in story arc. While that's not enough to overshadow the book's merits, the rather limp final tale/epilogue means that Ten W In this short novel, Marcela Serrano introduces us to nine women and their therapist. Of varying ages and social backgrounds, all are from Chile and all are dealing with some kind of pain and heartache. Serrano shows a real mastery of voice here—each woman sounds distinct, and believably the product of her own circumstances. She is however clearly less interested in plot or in story arc. While that's not enough to overshadow the book's merits, the rather limp final tale/epilogue means that Ten Women doesn't quite have the takeaway punch it could have had.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    This novel was a freebie during an International Book Week...or something. Ten different woman share their stories with varying degrees of trauma and emotional distress. There is a broad cross section of women so that there is more than a drop of Chilean culture meted out to the reader. There are young, old, rich, poor, famous, almost invisible, pretty and not pretty. All of these women display some kind mental/emotional struggle. Mental concerns include:d depression, narcissism, anxiety, PTSD, This novel was a freebie during an International Book Week...or something. Ten different woman share their stories with varying degrees of trauma and emotional distress. There is a broad cross section of women so that there is more than a drop of Chilean culture meted out to the reader. There are young, old, rich, poor, famous, almost invisible, pretty and not pretty. All of these women display some kind mental/emotional struggle. Mental concerns include:d depression, narcissism, anxiety, PTSD, alcoholism, sex addiction, battered woman syndrome, emotional detachment etc. On the whole, this was not a pleasant read. The stories are all sad, including the story of the therapist Natasha. Also, the stories are really not very well tied together. This is more a story collection than a novel and some of the stories are better written than others. Taken as a whole, this was an interesting novel that was too distributed for my tastes. I have no idea what the author was trying to convey. The problems discussed seem to exist in a lot of different cultures in my view. Interesting but not completely satisfying. 3+ Stars Listened to the audio book. The narration was good.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Kellenberger

    Incredible! This is a story about nine Chilean women, all under the care of their therapist Natasha, who is the tenth woman and makes this series of stories complete. When I first opened this book, my heart sank a little because it is 10 separate short stories. I'm not usually a fan of short stories, but the author wove these stories together so seamlessly, it ended up being a full novel and a complete pleasure to read. In Ten Women, we learn the life stories of nine Chilean women who have all h Incredible! This is a story about nine Chilean women, all under the care of their therapist Natasha, who is the tenth woman and makes this series of stories complete. When I first opened this book, my heart sank a little because it is 10 separate short stories. I'm not usually a fan of short stories, but the author wove these stories together so seamlessly, it ended up being a full novel and a complete pleasure to read. In Ten Women, we learn the life stories of nine Chilean women who have all had different experiences in life and are seeking help through their therapist. From a woman who has been abandoned without notice by her husband to a famous television personality, a teenage lesbian, a housekeeper, and to women who are rich and alone and women who live in abject poverty, these tales are heart-rending and full of beauty. They also describe the cultural and social groups of modern Chile, and thus the reader learns so much about this stunning country in South America. I am utterly astounded by Serrano's ability to write ten different personalities into her novel, all from very different backgrounds, but all connected through their therapist. This is a beautiful read. I received this book through a free giveaway through Amazon on World Book Day. It was bundled with eight other books. I've been working my way through this book set specifically because it was a set of books from other countries that had been translated to English. My armchair travels through Chile were exceptional and so far this book has been my favorite out of all nine books that were up for grabs that day. Books really do allow us to travel the world. Special thanks to Haley Ware for sending me the book deal. My last 12 hours of reading are dedicated to her. Best Takeaway Quotes: This quote was my favorite in Ten Women because it so accurately summed up my own feelings about this period in my life. “I recently turned forty-two, a complicated stage of life. You’re young, but not very, you’re not elderly, but you are a bit old. Neither fish nor fowl. It’s the transition from one thing to the other, the real start of deterioration. Sometimes I feel like I want to have aged already, to be an old woman who has resolved all her expectations.” ― Marcela Serrano, Ten Women “Listening to stories gives you many lives, telling them dims loneliness.” ― Marcela Serrano, Diez mujeres “Women among women know how not to feel alone.” ― Marcela Serrano, Diez mujeres “traveling allows you to discover things that remain hidden during the normal routine of daily life.” ― Marcela Serrano, Ten Women “Hatred is like blood, it’s impossible to conceal and it stains everything.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Ten disparate short stories Perhaps it's the translation, but this book is just a series of ten short stories told by each narrator about their lives. Some are young, some old, all women. There is no central theme, except perhaps that each is really alone. Don't we all die alone even when surrounded by loved ones? I don't get it. Ten disparate short stories Perhaps it's the translation, but this book is just a series of ten short stories told by each narrator about their lives. Some are young, some old, all women. There is no central theme, except perhaps that each is really alone. Don't we all die alone even when surrounded by loved ones? I don't get it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ridhima Agarwal

    TW: book carries mentions of rape, assault, violence Ten Women brings to life the stories of ten different kinds of women in Chile. The story is told from each woman's POV as she describes her life's experiences and the road that led her to the therapist, Natasha's office. I'd like to say that I expected a lot more from this book going into it. I loved the varying kinds of ages, cultural differences and backgrounds that were introduced in the plot. Each one offered a unique insight into the li TW: book carries mentions of rape, assault, violence Ten Women brings to life the stories of ten different kinds of women in Chile. The story is told from each woman's POV as she describes her life's experiences and the road that led her to the therapist, Natasha's office. I'd like to say that I expected a lot more from this book going into it. I loved the varying kinds of ages, cultural differences and backgrounds that were introduced in the plot. Each one offered a unique insight into the life of women in Chile during different political and familial backdrops, and made you relate to their pain and heartache. However , I wanted the women to interact, to bond, and to share their stories in a more conversational manner. But this novel made each woman's storyline into a monologue with absolutely no interaction between any of them. We get a small glimpse of each one's appearances, expressions, and body language initially in the first chapter but never see anything like that again. I'll say that reading this work of Marcela Serrano is recommended only if you want individualized accounts from different women and to learn about their lives. But if you want a story line that takes you on a journey along with the characters, you'll be disappointed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    Juana: I think that one person’s story is always part of other people’s stories. (p. 82) I've never been to Chile, and I'm not sure that I have read another book by a Chilean author. In fact, I know embarrassingly little about Chilean life (mostly stereotypes from my childhood). Given this, Marcela Serrano's Ten Woman was a good way to get a diverse view of Chilean women. The women in this book are rich and poor; young and old; lesbian, heterosexual, and asexual; widowed, single, married; Chilean Juana: I think that one person’s story is always part of other people’s stories. (p. 82) I've never been to Chile, and I'm not sure that I have read another book by a Chilean author. In fact, I know embarrassingly little about Chilean life (mostly stereotypes from my childhood). Given this, Marcela Serrano's Ten Woman was a good way to get a diverse view of Chilean women. The women in this book are rich and poor; young and old; lesbian, heterosexual, and asexual; widowed, single, married; Chilean-born and immigrant. They were gang raped, molested, annoyed by TV-watching husbands, in the midst of an existential crisis, and broken down by poverty and life circumstances. The premise: nine women were invited on a retreat and each, by turn, told the story of her life. They occasionally referred to Natasha, their psychologist, and rarely referred to each other. If Natasha was attempting to build a sense of community, which she seems to have wanted to do, she doesn't seem successful. A real group therapy retreat would involve listening to the other women speak, but also responding to them. The content of each woman's monologue was different, but their voices still sounded alike. Wealthy, well-educated women sounded like poor and uneducated women? Young like old? Perhaps the translation wiped out stylistic differences? Simona: How far can you compromise without seriously violating your identity, without permanently losing self-respect? (p. 104) Natasha then allowed her assistant to tell her story for her. What psychologist would turn the focus to herself in this way (view spoiler)[especially as she prepares to leave them and the country (hide spoiler)] ? It's all about me, folks!!! Blech! (This lost the book a star.) Natasha seemed to have otherwise done good work with these women. They certainly adored her (which, of course, says nothing about the quality of her work). Lupe: Why the hell do we spend our whole lives seeking love? Why are we capable of doing anything for people to love us? (p. 177).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bobbi

    Ten Women by Marcela Serrano is supposed to be, well, I'm not exactly sure. If it's supposed to be a slice of life novel, the slice of each life that the reader receives is so small that they're still left hungry after ten pieces. If it's supposed to be a story about mental illness, it's hard to know what the author is trying to say about it. It feels like there was supposed to be a story here, but the author flounders with the idea to the point that all we're left with is exposition. Even thoug Ten Women by Marcela Serrano is supposed to be, well, I'm not exactly sure. If it's supposed to be a slice of life novel, the slice of each life that the reader receives is so small that they're still left hungry after ten pieces. If it's supposed to be a story about mental illness, it's hard to know what the author is trying to say about it. It feels like there was supposed to be a story here, but the author flounders with the idea to the point that all we're left with is exposition. Even though there are ten different women, including the therapist, it's hard to tell any of them apart. Most of them just aren't memorable. The tone each of their chapters was written in was exactly the same, so that all of their voices blended together in monotony. This made the book drag on to the point that I wanted to quit reading it, but I didn't, because each chapter was short enough as to make me believe that the next one might be better if I just got through the one I was in the middle of. I honestly think it dragged down my mood. One of the most glaring bits of this book that I didn't like was the fact that literally nothing happened. The women told their stories, but they were all bland, and after they were introduced, the reader didn't get to hear from them ever again. None of them got closure, still complaining of their ills at the time that this story takes place, and the end of the book seemed forced because of it. Also, many of the same traumas were repeated, and it seemed like the author wanted to use them for shock value. It had the opposite effect, one of boredom and almost anger. As a survivor, I'm less than pleased. Overall, I wouldn't recommend reading this book. If you're feeling happy, it'll bring you down and make the world seem grey, and if you're not in a good place, it'll make you feel worse. I threw in a second star because the descriptive writing was beautiful at times, but it's not enough to save it. Even if you got it for free from amazon like I did, I don't think it's worth it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kelly_Hunsaker_reads ...

    Marcela Serrano is a well-known writer in Chile, but Ten Women is the first of her books to be translated into English. When Amazon recently offered free books for 8 novels in translation I gladly scooped this one up. And I felt it offered a unique view of life in post-Pinochet Chile. Serrano told her story through a simple concept. Nine women are in therapy. Each one is at a very different place in life. They are old and young, rich and poor. But despite their differences they are all struggling Marcela Serrano is a well-known writer in Chile, but Ten Women is the first of her books to be translated into English. When Amazon recently offered free books for 8 novels in translation I gladly scooped this one up. And I felt it offered a unique view of life in post-Pinochet Chile. Serrano told her story through a simple concept. Nine women are in therapy. Each one is at a very different place in life. They are old and young, rich and poor. But despite their differences they are all struggling with an aspect of life and have chosen to get help from their therapist, Natasha. They have come together to share their stories, and while gathered they also learn about Natasha's personal story -- told to them by her assistant. Strangely, the therapist is present and is commenting on the women, but she doesn't join them or speak to them. I wanted to love this book. It seemed like it was meant for me. It focuses on women. It exposes the hard parts of life. It is all about life in a place that is completely foreign to me. Unfortunately though, I didn't connect with the characters. I found that this book is told in such a way that the characters feel one-dimensional, and there is a sameness to them. I barely noticed the passage from one chapter, and one woman's story, to the next. I expected this one to be emotional but didn't find that to be true. There is no warmth to the book. Unfortunately it felt more like ten unresolved short stories, or worse, like ten monologues. In the end, when I closed the book I also forgot the women. ****** Please follow me at my Facebook book blog: https://www.facebook.com/Kelly-Hunsak... and on Bookstagram: https://www.instagram.com/kelly_hunsa...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lyndsey Bookish Nature

    A lovely collection of ten different Chilean women’s stories. They all have lead very different lives but have come together at the request of their therapist. Very interesting read. I’d liked to have seen more of a group conclusion where they have a group story or something, but nice grouping of stories regardless.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Hill

    depressing. might be good for someone going through a lot of work on themselves.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anushree

    Set in the contemporary Chilean city of Santiago this book shines a light on the passion, pathos, compulsions and unbegun dreams of ten women who differ widely and wildly in temperament, age, personality and circumstances. Natasha, the tenth woman and the therapist to nine versatile women, invites them all to an 'institute' - we don't know why - to share their journey with each other. The chapters are named after each woman, who narrate their life - lived and unlived - with a raw, aching beauty Set in the contemporary Chilean city of Santiago this book shines a light on the passion, pathos, compulsions and unbegun dreams of ten women who differ widely and wildly in temperament, age, personality and circumstances. Natasha, the tenth woman and the therapist to nine versatile women, invites them all to an 'institute' - we don't know why - to share their journey with each other. The chapters are named after each woman, who narrate their life - lived and unlived - with a raw, aching beauty and unflinching honesty. The nakedness of their narrative is at once brilliant and brittle. Someone's a rape survivor, someone's struggling with ageism, someone's raising a teenager with a mental disorder while caring for a stroke-stricken mother not knowing how to make ends meet. There are ladies with inheritance and successful careers who know something has snapped but not what or how to fix it. There's nebulous sexuality and promiscuity, shifting sexual identity, middle-age crises and an utter and absolute failure to move on from trauma. At last, we see the vulnerable side of the therapist and the purpose behind this meeting is revealed. Through all of these poignant and striking narratives, the universality of mental health issues in womanhood has been aptly highlighted. I didn't connect with all the narratives. At points, the book felt stretched too thin, but I can see how this tedium was a rhythm of reality. From personal experience, I know therapy and self-exploration (examination?) to be unglamorous and demanding. It requires an elephantine resolve to go on clawing at dirt (stuff we will rather ignore or leave alone) in the hope of finding baubles (insights). This is a highly recommended, absorbing read, so remember to pace yourself out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kszr

    An interesting way to introduce the concepts of emptiness. The central character, each person's therapist, is only announced at the beginning at the end, with each of the other ladies speaking, as a real group therapy session. All of these women have experienced loss and pain in different ways, but all are "broken" the same way. They have carried this so deep in their bones that is has become part of their DNA. This book is laid out in such a way that each chapter is another's story being told. An interesting way to introduce the concepts of emptiness. The central character, each person's therapist, is only announced at the beginning at the end, with each of the other ladies speaking, as a real group therapy session. All of these women have experienced loss and pain in different ways, but all are "broken" the same way. They have carried this so deep in their bones that is has become part of their DNA. This book is laid out in such a way that each chapter is another's story being told. The only common thread is Natasha, which is where each story ends. And then the book goes through Natasha's story. They were all drawn to each other by something that was missing. The purpose of the collection, both of the ladies that day and of the book, is that you are shown that you need to go find what it is that is missing within you. Take your time but do not ever forget. It is that drive that will keep you alive.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Nine Chilean women recount the stories of their lives in a group session at the home of their therapist, Natasha. Although Natasha never appears, her story is also told, this time by her assistant. Each woman has unique life experiences to share. They range in age from an 18-year-old to a woman in her 70's and their economic backgrounds are just as disparate. What they all share is a recognition of their own self-worth and a new found independence. Their stories are engaging and filled with thei Nine Chilean women recount the stories of their lives in a group session at the home of their therapist, Natasha. Although Natasha never appears, her story is also told, this time by her assistant. Each woman has unique life experiences to share. They range in age from an 18-year-old to a woman in her 70's and their economic backgrounds are just as disparate. What they all share is a recognition of their own self-worth and a new found independence. Their stories are engaging and filled with their past struggles whether it be love, family, politics, children, money or lack of money. I enjoyed this book quite a bit not to mention the peek into Chile's culture.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kaora

    One of the ten free books I received from Amazon, but only the third I've read so far. The first two were good, but while this one kept me reading I kept waiting for some big reveal as to why we were hearing all these women's stories and it just never came so by the end I was quite disappointed. It didn't make sense to me why all these women travelled to this house to tell their stories and leave. I did enjoy the stories themselves, but none of them really resonated with me. On to the next. One of the ten free books I received from Amazon, but only the third I've read so far. The first two were good, but while this one kept me reading I kept waiting for some big reveal as to why we were hearing all these women's stories and it just never came so by the end I was quite disappointed. It didn't make sense to me why all these women travelled to this house to tell their stories and leave. I did enjoy the stories themselves, but none of them really resonated with me. On to the next.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Michelle

    This was not a great read for me. First, I had no idea it was ten freaking short stories [this is what happens when you don't really read the description about the book] and after about 4 of them, I was so NOT invested. Everyone was unhappy. It was a lot of whining. Look, I lived in a foreign country. I know what its like and of course its not all happiness and unicorns. But you cannot tell me that NOT ONE OF THESE WOMEN has had any kind of happiness. Meh. I was really unimpressed with this. This was not a great read for me. First, I had no idea it was ten freaking short stories [this is what happens when you don't really read the description about the book] and after about 4 of them, I was so NOT invested. Everyone was unhappy. It was a lot of whining. Look, I lived in a foreign country. I know what its like and of course its not all happiness and unicorns. But you cannot tell me that NOT ONE OF THESE WOMEN has had any kind of happiness. Meh. I was really unimpressed with this.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Reham Elmligy

    i decided it's always inspiring to read women's writing i decided it's always inspiring to read women's writing

  21. 4 out of 5

    Polly Vella

    I enjoyed reading stories about these diverse 10 women in Chile and how their experiences have shaped them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    Because this book was really 10 different stories it didn’t really read like a typical book. Each story was sad and different. I couldn’t really relate to any of the characters, but empathized with them.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    A poignant, thoughtful, and moving look deep into the lives of nine women and the woman that brought them to this healing point in their lives. SUMMARY Nine Chilean women from different walks of life are brought together by their beloved therapist, Natasha, to share their stories with each other. From a teenage girl confronting her sexual identity to a middle-aged recluse, these women have nothing in common. The women represent many cultural, racial, and social groups that comprised modern Chile. A poignant, thoughtful, and moving look deep into the lives of nine women and the woman that brought them to this healing point in their lives. SUMMARY Nine Chilean women from different walks of life are brought together by their beloved therapist, Natasha, to share their stories with each other. From a teenage girl confronting her sexual identity to a middle-aged recluse, these women have nothing in common. The women represent many cultural, racial, and social groups that comprised modern Chile. From housekeeper to celebrity television personality, together their stories form a collage that is at times achingly sad, and at other times funny and inspiring. As the women tell their stories many unlikely common threads are discovered and bonds are formed. Their separate stories form an intricately woven tale of triumph, heartache and healing that will resonate with women everywhere. “How these women move me. How they sadden me. Why did half of humanity take on such a great burden and leave the other half to rest?” REVIEW What a interesting work of fiction! By having each woman tell her own story you are drawn into the book and it feels so real. I would not have been surprised if you told me this was a work of non-fiction. The first story is Francisca’s who is forty two, successful in real estate development, but not so much with life in general or in her relationship with her mother. She tells us she hates her mother and she been in therapy with Natasha the longest. Then we hear Mané’s story, who is seventy-five the oldest of the women, and says she used to be gorgeous, and her story is about her personal shame of aging. She says the movie Sunset Boulevard is like the story of her life. There are also the stories of a women who was raped by soldiers on a trip to Israel, and a popular television reporter who is not sure who she is and cannot sleep without medication. The voice of each woman is strong and moving, despite telling a painful or horrific story. Gripping and evocative, the women’s stories will haunt you well after the the last page is turned. It’s a beautifully written work that should have wide appeal with all women of a certain age. The part I like most was the diversity of the women included in the story. My least favorite part of the book was having Natasha’s story, which is rightfully told last, be told by her long time assistant. If you are looking for a book with a plot and a story line, this is not the book for you. This book’s strength is in it’s first person storytelling format. MARCELLA SERRANO is an award winning Chilean novelist. Her debut novel We Love You So Much won the Literary Prize in Santiago. She is widely considered one of the best Latin American writers working today. Translated Beth Fowler Narrated Marisol Ramirez Publisher BrillianceAudio/ AmazonCrossing Publication February 25, 2014 “Being old is always feeling tired. It’s waking up tired, it’s going around all day tired, and it’s going to bed tired.” www.bluestockingreviews.com for more

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    For such a short book, this took me FOREVER to read. This was my "well, I'm in-between books at the moment, let's see what's on my e-reader ..." followed up immediately with "Oh yeah. Ten Women. Am I even half through yet?" I just couldn't get into this book at all. Mind you, there were some lovely passages, highlight-worthy quotes, and a few things resonated with me. But it just didn't have my kind of oomph. The book gives each Chilean woman a chapter ... 9 women are therapy patients and the 10t For such a short book, this took me FOREVER to read. This was my "well, I'm in-between books at the moment, let's see what's on my e-reader ..." followed up immediately with "Oh yeah. Ten Women. Am I even half through yet?" I just couldn't get into this book at all. Mind you, there were some lovely passages, highlight-worthy quotes, and a few things resonated with me. But it just didn't have my kind of oomph. The book gives each Chilean woman a chapter ... 9 women are therapy patients and the 10th is their therapist who isn't actually in that room with them. Her story is told last ... and by her assistant. All the patients are from different backgrounds, they've lived differently, and they range from young to old. What really didn't work for me was (and perhaps this is a 'lost in translation' situation) the endlessly long story that each woman told, stream of consciousness, uninterrupted. Why gather a group of women together to simply be audience members as each one has their spotlight? Wouldn't it make more sense to say "here! all of you! you're so different but essentially you're all the same, same pain, same struggles, same doubts ... regardless of status, sexual preference, or age". But that never happens. There's no interaction. There's no bonding. There's no interruption or crossover or "How would you handle this?" or really anything else that would give a real reason for all these woman to be sharing their stories with each other. Moreover, we have no idea how the listeners in the room are reacting - or being affected by - the stories they are hearing. Does it strike a nerve, give an ah-ha moment, resonate, open a new point of view? Your guess is as good as mine. Also, I really hoped that this book would give me a snapshot of what it was like to be a woman in Chile. Sadly, apart from a few references to streets, areas, maybe a cultural reference or two, all these women could have been from places I've lived in the United States. So, that was rather a disappointment as well, not really getting a better picture of the struggles pertaining to living in another culture. I guess though, that only further reinforces the notion that all people struggle with the same issues no matter where their pin sits on the atlas.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    My book club made this selection for its foreign, female author, and it didn't disappoint! Set in Chile, nine women who are seeing a therapist (the 10th woman) come together to tell their stories. Each chapter is narrated in a different woman's voice, and they rarely connect. However, the reader comes to realize that there are similar themes in every woman's life: broken relationships, challenging children, professional worrries, image insecurity, and financial concerns (even for the wealthy). W My book club made this selection for its foreign, female author, and it didn't disappoint! Set in Chile, nine women who are seeing a therapist (the 10th woman) come together to tell their stories. Each chapter is narrated in a different woman's voice, and they rarely connect. However, the reader comes to realize that there are similar themes in every woman's life: broken relationships, challenging children, professional worrries, image insecurity, and financial concerns (even for the wealthy). With beautiful writing, the author makes the case that in the end, our stories are all the same.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tom Rowe

    Nine Chilean women go on a retreat with their therapist. They then introduce themselves by telling the others how their lives are all messed up. That's pretty much it. Well written and well translated. I now know a little more about Chile than I did before. Each tale was interesting. It was hard to get absorbed into the book because it was really 10 different stories and not one long story, but each story was worth the read. Nine Chilean women go on a retreat with their therapist. They then introduce themselves by telling the others how their lives are all messed up. That's pretty much it. Well written and well translated. I now know a little more about Chile than I did before. Each tale was interesting. It was hard to get absorbed into the book because it was really 10 different stories and not one long story, but each story was worth the read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella

    you can listen ten different stories of ten different women that togheter want to realize theirselves. A psychological romance that tell you the weakness and strongness of women during their life, in different places and times but they meet each other into the same room to be part of a whole big histrory

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    3.5 stars - This is not a cohesive story of the ten women whose lives are told in this book. It is really a collection of short stories, which consist of each woman in turn telling about herself and her past. There are nine women who have been brought together by their psychologist, Natasha, and they tell the group the stories of their lives. It is not explained why Natasha has brought them together for this revealing exercise. At the end, Natasha's assistant relates Natasha's past to the women 3.5 stars - This is not a cohesive story of the ten women whose lives are told in this book. It is really a collection of short stories, which consist of each woman in turn telling about herself and her past. There are nine women who have been brought together by their psychologist, Natasha, and they tell the group the stories of their lives. It is not explained why Natasha has brought them together for this revealing exercise. At the end, Natasha's assistant relates Natasha's past to the women rather than Natasha herself. It appears that the therapist is not in the room to hear the story of her past. At first I really enjoyed the various stories. The women are at a wide variety of stages of their lives and have vastly different pasts. Some have had good lives with loving families and successful careers. Others are quite poor and mostly alone. Eventually I tired of the lack of an enjoined narrative that would tie the stories together. I don't need lots of plot in a book, but in the end this was ten chapters of a "tell us about yourself" scenario so nothing actually happens . The action is all part of the women's pasts, and while some of it was extremely compelling, it didn't go anywhere new. The reader knows already that each woman has survived her trauma well enough to come relate it to others. I needed more of a story to anticipate and wonder what would happen next. Additionally the nine women do not interact with each other at all. The majority of them never mention any of the other women or refer to the mutual therapy session they are experiencing. The lack of acknowledgement of each other is odd.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle | Nine Tale Vixen

    content warnings: (view spoiler)[ableism & ableist language, classism, racism, homophobia, threat of being outed, loss of loved ones, grief, depressive episodes, infidelity, relationship with significant age gap (14 and 19), domestic violence, rape, incest, pedophilia, self-medication, self-harm, Holocaust mention (hide spoiler)] rep: (view spoiler)[Chilean main cast & setting; multiracial MCs, first-gen and second-gen immigrant MCs, lesbian MC, Arabic MC, Jewish MC, MC with ADHD, secondary chara content warnings: (view spoiler)[ableism & ableist language, classism, racism, homophobia, threat of being outed, loss of loved ones, grief, depressive episodes, infidelity, relationship with significant age gap (14 and 19), domestic violence, rape, incest, pedophilia, self-medication, self-harm, Holocaust mention (hide spoiler)] rep: (view spoiler)[Chilean main cast & setting; multiracial MCs, first-gen and second-gen immigrant MCs, lesbian MC, Arabic MC, Jewish MC, MC with ADHD, secondary character with bipolar disorder (hide spoiler)] Rating translated novels is tricky since I have to treat the author and translator as one entity, being unable to distinguish their respective contributions to the novel as I experienced it. With that in mind, though, I didn't find any of the women or their backstories to be particularly compelling, though it's always eye-opening to read about experiences and beliefs so different from my own. The premise was mildly intriguing but serves more as a blurred backdrop than a unifying framework for the disjointed chapters. Still, I think it was the last chapter (plus the epilogue) that knocked this down to 2 stars: the presented themes that I didn't feel were conveyed throughout the novel, and my general confusion as to what all was going on. ----------- CONVERSION : 5.85 / 15 = 2 stars Prose: 4 / 10 Characters & Relationships: 3 / 10 Emotional Impact: 4 / 10 Development / Flow: 2 / 10 Setting: 5 / 10 Diversity & Social Themes: 3 / 5 Intellectual Engagement: 2 / 5 Originality / Trope Execution: 3 / 5 Memorability: 1 / 5

  30. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Natasha, watching 9 women walk up to the house where she awaits them, thinks: All making an effort to be a bit happier. To heal themselves. All of them genuinely dedicated to living the best kind of life within their means. Natasha is a psychiatrist and has asked 9 of her women patients to come and tell their personal stories to the group. What follows is each woman's unique story. The 10th woman is Natasha herself, whose story is told at the end by her assistant. These women had never met each o Natasha, watching 9 women walk up to the house where she awaits them, thinks: All making an effort to be a bit happier. To heal themselves. All of them genuinely dedicated to living the best kind of life within their means. Natasha is a psychiatrist and has asked 9 of her women patients to come and tell their personal stories to the group. What follows is each woman's unique story. The 10th woman is Natasha herself, whose story is told at the end by her assistant. These women had never met each other before this day; Natasha is the only link they have to each other. Yet as each different story is told, there are common themes, similar struggles and emotions, reflected that in the end bind them to each other, to Natasha and to the reader. Every single story was relatable. Some are sad, some are tragic, some are about struggle, others about coming into your own identity. The age of the women spans young adult to elder, covering the wide expanse of women's roles and experiences in today's world. I saw bits of my self in so many, or recognized friends and acquaintances. I was pulled into each story. At the very end as all are leaving, Natasha's voice returns in a little epilogue where the reasons for this session are disclosed: In the end, she tells herself, moving away from the window, after everything, in one way or another, we all have the same story to tell. The author is a prize winning Chilean author, and this is her first work translated into English. I hope more of her work is soon available to us.

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