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#EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education

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Your formula for managing innovation and transforming learning #EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education is a refreshing change from the negativity so common in the world of education today. Over the course of a 3-month solo road trip across the United States, author Grant Lichtman discovered that there is much to be positive about in today's K-12 schools. Lichtman, Your formula for managing innovation and transforming learning #EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education is a refreshing change from the negativity so common in the world of education today. Over the course of a 3-month solo road trip across the United States, author Grant Lichtman discovered that there is much to be positive about in today's K-12 schools. Lichtman, one of the country's leading experts in educational innovation, interviewed over 600 teachers, administrators, students, parents, and trustees to find out what kind of innovations they're doing right--and how others can leverage their successes. Innovation in education takes hard work, planning, and cooperation. With examples from around the country and findings from the latest education research, #EdJourney maps out how administrators and teachers can embrace the innovation process that schools and learners need now. Today's 21st century education presents unique challenges and opportunities to students, and this is a trailblazing practical guide to making sure education is ready for the future. #EdJourney focuses on four key questions: What new learning strategies are the top schools implementing to prepare our students for their future rather than for our past? How do teachers and administrators manage transitions to new types of teaching and learning? What are the key obstacles to shifting away from the assembly line model of education? How can we all leverage the lessons of success from the most innovative schools? The concrete examples and advice in this book will help you bring innovation and educational design concepts into your school. #EdJourney goes beyond the theoretical need for change--by now a familiar topic to almost everyone--and takes a real-world approach to achieving transformative education in any school.


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Your formula for managing innovation and transforming learning #EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education is a refreshing change from the negativity so common in the world of education today. Over the course of a 3-month solo road trip across the United States, author Grant Lichtman discovered that there is much to be positive about in today's K-12 schools. Lichtman, Your formula for managing innovation and transforming learning #EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education is a refreshing change from the negativity so common in the world of education today. Over the course of a 3-month solo road trip across the United States, author Grant Lichtman discovered that there is much to be positive about in today's K-12 schools. Lichtman, one of the country's leading experts in educational innovation, interviewed over 600 teachers, administrators, students, parents, and trustees to find out what kind of innovations they're doing right--and how others can leverage their successes. Innovation in education takes hard work, planning, and cooperation. With examples from around the country and findings from the latest education research, #EdJourney maps out how administrators and teachers can embrace the innovation process that schools and learners need now. Today's 21st century education presents unique challenges and opportunities to students, and this is a trailblazing practical guide to making sure education is ready for the future. #EdJourney focuses on four key questions: What new learning strategies are the top schools implementing to prepare our students for their future rather than for our past? How do teachers and administrators manage transitions to new types of teaching and learning? What are the key obstacles to shifting away from the assembly line model of education? How can we all leverage the lessons of success from the most innovative schools? The concrete examples and advice in this book will help you bring innovation and educational design concepts into your school. #EdJourney goes beyond the theoretical need for change--by now a familiar topic to almost everyone--and takes a real-world approach to achieving transformative education in any school.

30 review for #EdJourney: A Roadmap to the Future of Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Karissa

    I don't remember how I obtained a copy of this book, but I have now read it! The author Grant Lichtman, went on a road trip to different schools with the same question: What does innovation mean to you? The book offers multiple anecdotes from his travels of different schools and what they've implemented to improve education for the students and teachers. Lichtman the road blocks that impede change and shares what some schools have done to resist them and preserver. One thing that stood out to me I don't remember how I obtained a copy of this book, but I have now read it! The author Grant Lichtman, went on a road trip to different schools with the same question: What does innovation mean to you? The book offers multiple anecdotes from his travels of different schools and what they've implemented to improve education for the students and teachers. Lichtman the road blocks that impede change and shares what some schools have done to resist them and preserver. One thing that stood out to me was when he visited Presbyterian Day School (PDS) in Memphis and math units were explained to him. Students could take an assessment after spending about three days on the unit. If they passed at a high level could "then spend the next four days in either individiual or group projects to explore math-related topics of their choice in what they call a 'Guided Challenge'." (pg 113) As a teacher of GT students, I find this a beneficial practice and would like to look more into incorporating this into my practice. Finding the time (as mentioned in this text) to plan it is one obstacle I would face. Another idea that struck me was "'Student EdCon', a three-day, student-centered design thinking conference" (pg 155). "Nine different student teams pitched prototype ideas to our broader community, comprising their parents, our school board, superintendent, teachers, and administrators". This would be such an interesting idea to implement in high schools, and possibly as an 8th grade event in middle schools. Students could present ideas to improve their school or community and present in a conference style. One last take away from this book was this, "Some schools are stuck in the outdated mode of allowing teachers to attend a conference once a year or less, where teachers sit in a room with hundreds of others and listen to lectures" (pg 254). Summer professional development is pushed heavily, but then come the school year, it seems to be forgotten. Or the professional development that is planned tends to be planned on the Thursday/Friday before a large holiday, making it difficult for teachers to take time off. Ultimately, it was difficult for me to read through this book. It was interesting hearing about the different schools and how they've innovated their schools. But an important thing to remember that Lichtman notes at the beginning of the book is that change is not hard. Change is uncomfortable.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    “Everything we know about the history of successful innovation screams that we must move from theory to action: imagining, designing, testing, piloting, failing, tweaking. And we have to do this in shorter time frames and on a more continuous basis than schools are used to or comfortable with. The process of planning every few years is flawed. Innovation is an ongoing process; it needs to become deeply embedded in our everyday DNA, and at multiple levels of institutional organization.” Yes, yes, “Everything we know about the history of successful innovation screams that we must move from theory to action: imagining, designing, testing, piloting, failing, tweaking. And we have to do this in shorter time frames and on a more continuous basis than schools are used to or comfortable with. The process of planning every few years is flawed. Innovation is an ongoing process; it needs to become deeply embedded in our everyday DNA, and at multiple levels of institutional organization.” Yes, yes, yes! Book was a bit overloaded with the “ then I went to this school” examples, but the main idea is sound and what we need in successful schools today.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Oldridge

    I found the book dry. It seemed more like a man who was driving across the country, talking to random people, than it did a treatise on education reform. I must admit, I stopped reading about 1/4 of the way through.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marc

    Thought provoking book on educational change based on the author's three month driving trip across the US visiting schools and asking "What does innovation mean to you?" The stories of what is happening in these schools are interesting and provide a necessary backdrop for some bigger thinking. The true value in the book is in the bigger ideas that Lichtman pulls from the trip and the observations and perhaps even advice that he provides in Part Three of the book. Well worth spending the time. Thought provoking book on educational change based on the author's three month driving trip across the US visiting schools and asking "What does innovation mean to you?" The stories of what is happening in these schools are interesting and provide a necessary backdrop for some bigger thinking. The true value in the book is in the bigger ideas that Lichtman pulls from the trip and the observations and perhaps even advice that he provides in Part Three of the book. Well worth spending the time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  6. 4 out of 5

    Isabella Williams

  7. 5 out of 5

    John J.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bo Adams

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bethany Stotler

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kevin McShane

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rebbecca

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karl Lindgren-Streicher

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lehmann

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emmy314

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gaby

  16. 5 out of 5

    John

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Esau

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jan Indracek

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Goochee

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Walczak

  21. 5 out of 5

    Claire Howison

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  25. 4 out of 5

    Annalee T

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Thompson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  28. 5 out of 5

    Moss

  29. 5 out of 5

    jen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christine

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