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The Spy Who Haunted Me

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Eddie Drood's evil-stomping skills have come to the attention of the legendary Alexander King, Independent Agent extraordinaire. The best of the best, King spent a lifetime working for anyone and everyone, doing anything and everything, for the right price. Now, he's on his deathbed and looking to bestow all of his priceless secrets to a successor, provided he or she wins Eddie Drood's evil-stomping skills have come to the attention of the legendary Alexander King, Independent Agent extraordinaire. The best of the best, King spent a lifetime working for anyone and everyone, doing anything and everything, for the right price. Now, he's on his deathbed and looking to bestow all of his priceless secrets to a successor, provided he or she wins a contest to solve the world's greatest mysteries. Eddie has to win, because King holds the most important secret of all to the Droods - the identity of the traitor in their midst.


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Eddie Drood's evil-stomping skills have come to the attention of the legendary Alexander King, Independent Agent extraordinaire. The best of the best, King spent a lifetime working for anyone and everyone, doing anything and everything, for the right price. Now, he's on his deathbed and looking to bestow all of his priceless secrets to a successor, provided he or she wins Eddie Drood's evil-stomping skills have come to the attention of the legendary Alexander King, Independent Agent extraordinaire. The best of the best, King spent a lifetime working for anyone and everyone, doing anything and everything, for the right price. Now, he's on his deathbed and looking to bestow all of his priceless secrets to a successor, provided he or she wins a contest to solve the world's greatest mysteries. Eddie has to win, because King holds the most important secret of all to the Droods - the identity of the traitor in their midst.

30 review for The Spy Who Haunted Me

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    2.5 stars. Ok paranormal thriller in which Eddie is teamed up with five other agents, who must work together and compete against each other to solve five great mysteries. The best part of this was Walker from the Nightside being one of the agents.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Simon Green who penned the space opera Deathstalker series has turned his eye to urban fantasy and has a winner, I think, in the tales of his secret agent Shaman Bond a/k/a Eddie Drood. The Droods are a family of super secret agents who combat evil with the armor that encases them from a torc around their necks. Green has populated their world with all sorts of foul murderers, magical creatures, elfs, aliens, witches and spies. Eddie Drood, the grandson of the Matriarch of the clan Drood is one Simon Green who penned the space opera Deathstalker series has turned his eye to urban fantasy and has a winner, I think, in the tales of his secret agent Shaman Bond a/k/a Eddie Drood. The Droods are a family of super secret agents who combat evil with the armor that encases them from a torc around their necks. Green has populated their world with all sorts of foul murderers, magical creatures, elfs, aliens, witches and spies. Eddie Drood, the grandson of the Matriarch of the clan Drood is one of the secret agents that risks his life to keep the world safe. The novel start off with Drood assuming his namesake Shaman Bond in a plot to kill some ravens in the Tower of London, where we meet some of the odd villains and get a taste of the world. After Bond painlessly dispatches some of the co-conspirators, he returns to the family home for a super secret mission. He is to journey to the home of an earlier secret agent -- The Independent Agent, who claims to have secrets about a traitor who is harming the Drood interests. The Independent Agent, who appears to be deathly ill, has asked Drood and 5 other special up and coming secret agents to travel the world figuring out various magical mysteries. The winner of the contest will be granted access to all of the Independent Agent's secrets. The six agents are whisked around the world to face various bad guys including nasty aliens, a creature out of a Robert Louis Stevenson novel, a creature at the bottom of Loch Ness and others before a final confrontation at the end of the novel. Green is a master of the colorful characters, battle scenes with armor, swords and beasties. I felt the novel was a tad too long -- one less bad beastie may have moved it along at a better clip, but overall it was a fun journey and Eddie Drood is a good character, who has not worn out his welcome in this household.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rhyson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read this book a few years ago. It was entertaining to a certain degree, but....... Where do I begin? So there's this spy dude, who's apparently famous. And old. He says he wants to choose a successor to pass his secrets on to. Really? The author sat down, decided to write a novel, and said, "Gee, I think I'll have this dying spy send a bunch of people on a quest." Sure, the plot twist made it... not pathetic. But really, pathetic is a terrible way to start a book. So Eddie Drood and four othe I read this book a few years ago. It was entertaining to a certain degree, but....... Where do I begin? So there's this spy dude, who's apparently famous. And old. He says he wants to choose a successor to pass his secrets on to. Really? The author sat down, decided to write a novel, and said, "Gee, I think I'll have this dying spy send a bunch of people on a quest." Sure, the plot twist made it... not pathetic. But really, pathetic is a terrible way to start a book. So Eddie Drood and four other stooges go on a quest. *Edit: there's six of them. And that's how distinct their characteristics are: not at all.* To solve five mysteries. Starting with the Loch Ness monster. Because none of them thought to do that before. The spy dude didn't tell them what they needed to solve, he just sent them on their merry way. But first they had to figure out where in the world the teleporter put them. They find out through Walking GPS person, who has no other characteristics other than she was given a lot of technology by the FBI, that they're in Scotland. So they decide that the mystery the spy dude wants them to solve is the Loch Ness monster. But they're just guessing. It's an obvious guess, but they don't know. Remember that for later. Blah, blah, blah, one of them gets killed. And it's not an accident and the Loch Ness monster didn't do it. And the remaining four are like, "Meh, whatever. We can totally still be friends." Since they get teleported elsewhere, they decide they solved the mystery. Elsewhere is the Southern USA, gadget lady says. So they figure they need to solve the mystery of Bigfoot. Because none of them ever got curious before then. So these people, who are the most competent, skillful, brilliant, upcoming world class spies, use their stellar skills to seek out this bigfoot. They sit down and make a campfire. To make tea. Seriously. They do that. James Bond would totally sit down and make tea if he wanted to look for Bigfoot. But luckily, they don't need to search, since Bigfoot conveniently walks up to them. He's a furry pedophile. They kill him. And one of them dies. And it's not an accident and Bigfoot didn't do it. And they're like, "Whatever, we can totally still be friends." They get teleported to Russia, where the main character saves the remaining "super spies" from hypothermia. Then they get teleported to Philadelphia, where they decide that the mystery they need to solve is a random ship that disappeared in 1940. Um, what? Out of the whole city of Philadelphia, the biggest mystery is a ship that sink 60 years ago? For all they know, they need to solve the mystery of Mrs. Pinkerton's missing cat. They weren't given any hints what they needed to solve. Why pick that ship? Another one of them dies. And it's not an accident and the evil fairies didn't do it. And they're like, "Whatever, all three of us can still totally be friends." And then they get teleported to Midwestern USA. Didn't the author do any research to find out that in the whole, wide world, the biggest mysteries of life are NOT located in the USA? Boring racist. So yes, they're still stuck in the boring USA. And it's an alien invasion they figure they need to solve. Because there's humans and cows with body parts missing. There's a bull that's missing it's stomach, testicles, a patch of hide, and it's top front teeth. Dang. Based off of that, I'd say they have a much bigger mystery, because cows don't have top front teeth. The aliens managed to steal something the cows didn't have. Good job, aliens. And then there's the plot twist, that made the whole reason for the book seem not stupid, though it didn't touch the stupidity of the content. And Eddie Drood, ho, hum, average Gary Stue, saves the day. The end.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hicks

    Well, OK, it was written in 2009, and a lot of urban fantasy has passed by since then. And maybe I'd have taken more from the book if I had read the Nightside books. But this sure feels like one of those series written by a guy who thinks writing is easy and can bang out a book in a few weeks. This may be true if your hero has an invulnerable suit that can do, well, anything really - the only limit seems to be that it can't do things Eddie hasn't thought of yet. There goes any dramatic tension. Well, OK, it was written in 2009, and a lot of urban fantasy has passed by since then. And maybe I'd have taken more from the book if I had read the Nightside books. But this sure feels like one of those series written by a guy who thinks writing is easy and can bang out a book in a few weeks. This may be true if your hero has an invulnerable suit that can do, well, anything really - the only limit seems to be that it can't do things Eddie hasn't thought of yet. There goes any dramatic tension. OK, not that we thought Eddie would ever be at risk, any more than James Bond ever was. Each scene was describe-foe, make a speech, armour up and blast the baddie. No outsmarting (except in a couple of minor scenes), just straight-on BashBash. It's like reading an Asterix comic and waiting for Obélix to PAF! the Romans. There's even a nod to this from the author when he notes that none of his Q-analog's fancy weapons ever got used. Even the foes were mostly generic, lightly described and given to Flemingesque speeches of the "you see, Mr. Bond, bwah-ha, my plan is ..." And yes, I award no marks for wholesale theft of concept, plot and more from the Bond series. There comes a point where it passes tribute or pastiche and just becomes lazy. Beach read at best, maybe not even that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    It's really a 3.5, but it's a significant step above his normal work, so I had to give it a boost. Not that I don't like his other books, I've read most of them. But they aren't always that well done. The books in this series are longer and somewhat more complex than his other books. There is just a bit more story and depth. Not tons, but more. The series reminds me of a mix between James Bond and Xanth. Lots of puns, take-offs, and pop culture references. I'm sure I missed a lot of them, but I It's really a 3.5, but it's a significant step above his normal work, so I had to give it a boost. Not that I don't like his other books, I've read most of them. But they aren't always that well done. The books in this series are longer and somewhat more complex than his other books. There is just a bit more story and depth. Not tons, but more. The series reminds me of a mix between James Bond and Xanth. Lots of puns, take-offs, and pop culture references. I'm sure I missed a lot of them, but I enjoyed the ones I caught. I enjoyed his inclusion of references and characters to his other stories (Nightside and Shadows Fall in this one). On the one hand, it's fun, like when Buffy appeared on Angel. On the other hand, it feels a little lazy and like cheap advertising for his other books. But overall he made is work again (the last book included a character from his Deathstalker series). He made a very good choice in the character he chose to include. The best thing about the series is the main character, Eddie. He's just likable. I'm not thrilled with the concept of this adventure, where Eddie ends up at several famous sites of unexplained weirdness and has to discover the truth. But it was fun to get him out of England.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    The Spy Who Haunted Me is the third book in the Secret Histories series written by Simon R. Green. It stars Edwin Drood, code named Shaman Bond and he is a part of the Droods, an ancient family that purportedly watches over the world and protects it from various threats, including supernatural and magical ones. There are rumors of a traitor undermining the Drood family's efforts to guard humanity against paranormal and mystical threats. Complicating matters, legendary agent Arthur King is dying w The Spy Who Haunted Me is the third book in the Secret Histories series written by Simon R. Green. It stars Edwin Drood, code named Shaman Bond and he is a part of the Droods, an ancient family that purportedly watches over the world and protects it from various threats, including supernatural and magical ones. There are rumors of a traitor undermining the Drood family's efforts to guard humanity against paranormal and mystical threats. Complicating matters, legendary agent Arthur King is dying without an heir. Eddie joins a group of other agents in tackling King's challenge: solve five of mankind's greatest mysteries and learn King's secrets, including the traitor's name. The Spy Who Haunted Me is written rather well. The narrative is engaging with well-crafted quests take the team from Loch Ness to Roswell, where Eddie is forced to choose between saving humanity and recovering the information his family desperately needs. Though some supporting characters are clearly meant to be disposable, Eddie makes a likable hero, and readers will enjoy following him through this surprisingly complex mystery. It is another action-packed melding of spy story and fantasy, featuring suave sleuthing, magical powers and a generous dash of dry wit. All in all, The Spy Who Haunted Me is written rather well and is a good start to what would hopefully be a wonderful series, which I plan to continue in the very near future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Schnaucl

    The legendary Independent Agent is going into retirement so he invites 6 of the world's best agents (well 5 of the world's best agents and his grandson, who is a corporate spy) to compete in a contest. The group is to solve 5 mysteries, and the prize for the winner (there can be only one) is the Independent Agent's vast horde of secrets, including the name of the traitor inside the Drood family. I believe three of the other competitors are new characters, but readers of Green's Nightside series w The legendary Independent Agent is going into retirement so he invites 6 of the world's best agents (well 5 of the world's best agents and his grandson, who is a corporate spy) to compete in a contest. The group is to solve 5 mysteries, and the prize for the winner (there can be only one) is the Independent Agent's vast horde of secrets, including the name of the traitor inside the Drood family. I believe three of the other competitors are new characters, but readers of Green's Nightside series will certainly recognize Walker, and the Blue Fairy is from previous books in this series. The mysteries are quite interesting, ranging from discovering the truth about the Loch Ness monster to the Philadelphia Experiment. They're each interesting mysteries, although my one quibble is that Sasquatch is from the American Pacific Northwest, not Arkansas. I'm sure Arkansas has some lovely legends and myths of its own, but as a native of the Pacific Northwest, I feel compelled to point out that Sasquatch belongs to the Pacific Northwest. Predictably, since there can be only one winner, the agents begin being murdered, one by one. There's never any real concern that Walker would die, he's too major a character in the Nightside series to die in a different series, and, of course, Eddie Drood has to survive, but the rest are fair game. I didn't see the twist at the end but once it was revealed it was blindingly obvious. I really enjoyed learning more about Walker and seeing him when he's not interacting with John Taylor. It was also nice to see Eddie away from the politics of the Drood family and his girlfriend and just be himself on a mission. I like Molly, but I'd like to see more of that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shayan Kh

    2.6 stars Once again, a book that seems like an Agatha Christie mystery novel. Seriously, the whole time I was trying to guess who is the bad guy and who I can trust. But it wasn't as good as a mystery novel. And if you've read some of Christie's book you can guess the plot of this book. (view spoiler)[ I like the references to his other books. I really like a connected universe. And what Simon Green made so far is what I really like. I guess it could be quite annoying if it isn't your cup of t 2.6 stars Once again, a book that seems like an Agatha Christie mystery novel. Seriously, the whole time I was trying to guess who is the bad guy and who I can trust. But it wasn't as good as a mystery novel. And if you've read some of Christie's book you can guess the plot of this book. (view spoiler)[ I like the references to his other books. I really like a connected universe. And what Simon Green made so far is what I really like. I guess it could be quite annoying if it isn't your cup of tea. The added characters were really shallow. The CIA agent, who supposedly Eddie could have a thing for if not for Molly, didn't have anything that makes her stand out. I have read another book of the series, and I'm already forgetting about her. I don't remember anything about the other lady. This is just bad writing in my opinion. But I'm not reading Simon Green's work for his writing. I'm reading them for a world full of mystery, magic, action and interesting concepts( which this book lacked), and it was okay in this perspective. Especially since you have to read it to continue the series. The mysteries these agents had to investigate were disconnected, and they mostly didn't do anything that the King himself couldn't do. Except for the loch ness monster and the last one, but he didn't even know about the last one. So the expenses he made in advance wasn't justified in my opinion. (hide spoiler)] In other words, This wasn't a solid work. It was a patched-up mess of different stories and characters and is only recommended for those who like the series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aliyyah

    In this third installment in Simon R. Green's Secret Histories series, we find Eddie Drood back out in the field as Shaman Bond, no longer heading his family, but no closer to finding the traitor either. There is a brief escapade as Eddie as Shaman has to protect the Tower of London, but this seems more to point out that Eddie is no longer the head of the Droods and he likes it that way. He is then invited to play a high-stakes game with several of the best secret agents in the business for the In this third installment in Simon R. Green's Secret Histories series, we find Eddie Drood back out in the field as Shaman Bond, no longer heading his family, but no closer to finding the traitor either. There is a brief escapade as Eddie as Shaman has to protect the Tower of London, but this seems more to point out that Eddie is no longer the head of the Droods and he likes it that way. He is then invited to play a high-stakes game with several of the best secret agents in the business for the prize of winning all the secrets that the dying Independent Agent knows. The carrot for Eddie and the Drood clan is the supposed knowledge of the traitor in their midst. And so insues a madcap mystery-hopping tour through all the weird and deadly things that Simon Green is known for. For the first time we get to interact with Walker from the "Nightside" series as an individual, which I think may have been some of the best parts of the book. However the over-the-top nature of every new mystery gets to be a little repetitive after awhile (there can only be so many strange, uncertain, inhuman ways to be inhuman it seems). But all in all, a very good read and a nice break from the Drood infighting of the last book. So if you want some more Shaman Bond and his antics, then this novel is right up your alley. All I have to say is "I'm not weird,... I'm differently normal".

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cst

    This is much better than the previous book. Taking the characters and removing them from the world is a mistake, they aren’t that good. The story needs the world around it to keep it going, strange conspiracies, weird appearances and weirder powers. This book sends the characters on a scavenger hunt around the world and that is much better than the cooped up torture we had before. There are still problems, I had the big twist pegged much too early and the various tasks would have profited from v This is much better than the previous book. Taking the characters and removing them from the world is a mistake, they aren’t that good. The story needs the world around it to keep it going, strange conspiracies, weird appearances and weirder powers. This book sends the characters on a scavenger hunt around the world and that is much better than the cooped up torture we had before. There are still problems, I had the big twist pegged much too early and the various tasks would have profited from variety, but this book gives me more from that strange world. And Walker. I like Walker.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Adam Prat

    Of the series this one was probably the darkest of the novels so far. The book was split into mini adventures/ stories and story lines the author came up with were pretty intense and would almost put this one in a horror category as well as sci/fi fantasy. In retrospect it actually boosted up the the plot a bit as it really was innovative and compelling in the story. I think this one was shorter then the others or the plot just moved along a lot faster then the others. Overall it was a very good Of the series this one was probably the darkest of the novels so far. The book was split into mini adventures/ stories and story lines the author came up with were pretty intense and would almost put this one in a horror category as well as sci/fi fantasy. In retrospect it actually boosted up the the plot a bit as it really was innovative and compelling in the story. I think this one was shorter then the others or the plot just moved along a lot faster then the others. Overall it was a very good read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Scott Fogel

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The book started out a little confusingly, like I missed a book. However, it became very interesting as we got to the real story. I only have it 4 stars because or really started to drag when they went to Siberia in the third test. It picked back up again after that. Overall it was a good book and kept the series going well, building on the other books.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robin Toll

    Romping good read. This series is really drawing me in. I suppose on some level it feels a little old fashioned, but it's themed after James Bond- - and in a much more amusing way, to me - so it just sortof works. Looking forwards to the next one. Romping good read. This series is really drawing me in. I suppose on some level it feels a little old fashioned, but it's themed after James Bond- - and in a much more amusing way, to me - so it just sortof works. Looking forwards to the next one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laurla2

    a silly book where drood and 5 other top spys are recruited by 'the best' who is old and dying. they have to complete a series of 5 tasks and the winner gets all his secret knowledge. not as good as the nightside series, but still entertaining. "i am not weird, i'm just differently normal" a silly book where drood and 5 other top spys are recruited by 'the best' who is old and dying. they have to complete a series of 5 tasks and the winner gets all his secret knowledge. not as good as the nightside series, but still entertaining. "i am not weird, i'm just differently normal"

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    I enjoyed this book more than the last one. The premise was super easy to follow, and it kept me engaged the whole time. It was pretty predictable, though; I figured out the twist at the end by the end of the third chapter. But still, not a bad ending. Looking forward to starting the next book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Harrison

    I already read this one, but picked it up today because I hadn't taken it back to the library yet. Adding it towards my goodreads goal. I already read this one, but picked it up today because I hadn't taken it back to the library yet. Adding it towards my goodreads goal.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stan

    If you like Simon R. Green then you will like this nook. As usual in a Green novel the trip is more fun than the ending.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    I figured out The Who Done It - didn’t detract from the story or the plot, waited til it came along. Enjoyed this romp.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chianna

    Not my fave but good.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    I’m a big fan of the Nightside series and have been longing to find something to fill the gap now that I’ve finished the series. The Droodverse isn’t cutting it. Not even close.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charl

    The Drood stories are just as good as the Nightside ones, and this one includes a nice crossover between the two. An enjoyable read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Philippe Hyndrikx

    Good fun with some nice inside jokes and references , uncomplicated without any pretences

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The competition for King's secrets was a lot of fun, and it was neat to see the group of competitors somewhat working together to solve some of the world's greatest mysteries, with Green's own twist to them. Really enjoying reading this series and the Nightside series together, something I definitely recommend. To read my full review, please visit my blog: https://allyouneedarebooksandcats.wor... The competition for King's secrets was a lot of fun, and it was neat to see the group of competitors somewhat working together to solve some of the world's greatest mysteries, with Green's own twist to them. Really enjoying reading this series and the Nightside series together, something I definitely recommend. To read my full review, please visit my blog: https://allyouneedarebooksandcats.wor...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Another great read in the series. I really couldn't put this one down until i completed it. He is just serious enough to put an edge on but then it will go away with the revelation of one of the mysteries. The Crossover of walker from the Nightside series was awesome. Another great read in the series. I really couldn't put this one down until i completed it. He is just serious enough to put an edge on but then it will go away with the revelation of one of the mysteries. The Crossover of walker from the Nightside series was awesome.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Davie

    Third in the Secret Histories urban fantasy series about the Drood family who are the hidden protectors of the world. My Take Well, this was interesting. It was a lot of short stories woven into a larger tale of six of the world's greatest secret agents invited to play a game with the winner to gain all of Alexander King's, the Independent Agent's, secrets. And Green has brought Walker from the Nightside in as one of the participants. I love it! The Hiring Hall is incorporated as Pound of Flesh, I Third in the Secret Histories urban fantasy series about the Drood family who are the hidden protectors of the world. My Take Well, this was interesting. It was a lot of short stories woven into a larger tale of six of the world's greatest secret agents invited to play a game with the winner to gain all of Alexander King's, the Independent Agent's, secrets. And Green has brought Walker from the Nightside in as one of the participants. I love it! The Hiring Hall is incorporated as Pound of Flesh, Inc. with a tagline of We always take our cut. How very Shakespearean, LOL. Oh, then there's the Druid Nation with Let's put the fear back into Halloween! It's funny, it's outrageous, it's full of snark as the agents all take jabs at each other. It makes fun of, well, you name it. And this time around, Green brings in a bit of the Nightside with Walker as one of the gamesters. It was rather odd reading a story in which Walker is not treated as scarier than God. In between it all, there's Eddie trying to make peace with everyone, to foster a sense of teamwork. There's an attempt to bring sex into this, but it falls flat. Then there's Walker using his Voice. Once. After that he supposedly doesn't have it. Huh?? Oooh, a Drood at Strangefellows in the Nightside. I suspect Eddie will be quite happy never to return! The Story Another upheaval in who rules the Drood family and Eddie can't decide if he's happy or not about it. All of which becomes moot when he's invited to participate in King's game to discover which of six of the world's most promising agents will survive a game he has devised. They are to go out into the world and solve five mysteries, starting with the Loch Ness monster. Each agent brings their strengths and contacts---where communications are possible---to solve each mystery. Most of the mysteries require intuition and knowledge to even figure out what the mystery is! It's a deadly game with helpful results. Well, helpful to the inhabitants anyway. And threats from some very capable enemies. The Characters Eddie Drood, a.k.a., Shaman Bond, ruled his family---the one that rules the Universe---for a short time, but he's back in London as a field agent. Molly Metcalf has moved back to the wild woods and Eddie spends as much time as he can with her although it's not much in this story. Martha Drood is the Matriarch of the Droods, Eddie's grandmother. William is the whacko Librarian with Rafe as his assistant (and nanny); Uncle Jack is the Armourer who has way too much fun in his workshop (think of James Bond's Q); Cousin Harry is still around with his partner, Roger, the half-demon, his half-brother, AND his lover; there's still a Cedric as Sergeant-at-Arms, but he's sneakier than his predecessor; Ethel is still happily involved; and, Callan has recovered...mostly. The other agents include the Blue Fairy with his stolen torc; Honey Lake is CIA; Walker is...well, he's Walker from the Nightside, a force to be reckoned with; Peter King is the Independent Agent's grandson who specializes in industrial espionage; and, Lethal Harmony of Kathmandu uses her sex to sway those around her. Queen Mab has re-taken her throne from Oberon and Titania and has designs upon our world. Big Aus is part of an Australian gang interested in embarrassing the Queen. He's already hired on Coffin Jobe who has a tendency to fall down dead; the Dancing Fool who is the fastest fighter in the world with his déjà fu; and, Strange Chloe, the Goth's Goth, who can crumble the world with her gaze. Philip MacAlpine is paying for the mistakes of Daemons are Forever. Silly bugger, he should have known better! The Cover The cover is quite a colorful collage of events in its bright lime green electrifying the U.S.S. Eldridge with a beautiful royal blue sky behind and a decrepit pier before it. One of his fellow spies and Eddie are in silhouette in the foreground. I'm not really sure where the title came from. There are several possibilities from Eddie feeling the losses, the Independent Agent's history, and/or the mysterious person who keeps following them. Any of these could be The Spy Who Haunted Me.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Niraj

    A good romp in science fiction and fantasy. Fun and quick.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Yael

    Eddie Drood, a.k.a. Shaman Bond, is a top-rated secret agent. His family, the dreaded Droods, have from time out of mind protected the world from everything from vicious ETs to the forces of Hell itself. Now Eddie and five other of the greatest secret agents have been chosen to play a deadly game by Alexander King, the Independent Agent, the greatest secret agent in the world, who is dying. Only one can win, and the winner will inherit King's deepest secrets, the most valuable commodities in the Eddie Drood, a.k.a. Shaman Bond, is a top-rated secret agent. His family, the dreaded Droods, have from time out of mind protected the world from everything from vicious ETs to the forces of Hell itself. Now Eddie and five other of the greatest secret agents have been chosen to play a deadly game by Alexander King, the Independent Agent, the greatest secret agent in the world, who is dying. Only one can win, and the winner will inherit King's deepest secrets, the most valuable commodities in the world. Eddie, along with Honey Lake, a beautiful CIA agent; Walker of the Nightside, where the Sun never rises because some things can only take place in the dark; Lethal Harmony of Kathmandu, the most seductive and deadly female spy in the world; the Blue Fairy, a gay half-Elf at least as deadly as the others; and Peter King, Alexander King's own grandson must try to crack the world's five greatest mysteries. If he can, he and he alone will inherit King's secrets, while the rest will die. Yet all these agents must work together to win the goal, even if afterwards they must kill one another if they are to inherit the prize. The five of them set off via teleportation bracelets, visiting the world's most mysterious sites, trying to discover the truth about the terrifying secrets held by them: Loch Ness, where the real Loch Ness Monster still waits to be discovered; western Arkansas, near the border with Texas, where something masquerading as the Sasquatch lurks; X37, a deserted science city in the frozen heart of Siberia, close to where an exploding comet devastated the region in 1908, where spectres worse than anything living wait to destroy their souls; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where an open door to the land of the Fair Folk gapes to receive them; and Roswell, New Mexico, where aliens nothing like the friendly ET are preparing to turn every man, woman, and child in the world into weird organic machinery. As they travel from site to site, one by one agents are killed by an unknown assassin who could be any one of the surviving agents. At last only Eddie Drood and Walker are left to bring back the evidence of the truth of the mysteries they were sent to investigate. But upon confronting Alexander King in his posh lair in the Alps, they discover that all along, it was King, in the guise of his own grandson, Peter, who murdered the other agents. King gloatingly tells them that he had taken his grandson's life-force to enable him to rejuvenate, and then taken his grandson's place so that no one would suspect that he was still alive. He had planned to kill all the agents from the beginning in order to eliminate potential competition and threats. But now, as he prepares to murder Eddie and Walker, Eddie pulls one last surprise -- and he and Walker leave King dead in his lair, walking away with all King's secrets. This novel, one of a series, is every bit as gripping and entertaining as its predecessors, full of plot twists and surprises, and rich with humor.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Caldwell

    Book 3 of the Secret Histories seies. I am about halfway through and have found 3 contiguity problems between book 2 and book 3.One is very minor and the other two are larger.The small one is about Eddie. In book 2, he basically states he has seen too many James Bond movies,but in book 3 he tells the Matriach that he doesn't watch spy movies.The next one is about Subway Sue.In book 3, she is called one of the walking wounded and teamed up with Callan Drood. Unfortunately she was dead at the book Book 3 of the Secret Histories seies. I am about halfway through and have found 3 contiguity problems between book 2 and book 3.One is very minor and the other two are larger.The small one is about Eddie. In book 2, he basically states he has seen too many James Bond movies,but in book 3 he tells the Matriach that he doesn't watch spy movies.The next one is about Subway Sue.In book 3, she is called one of the walking wounded and teamed up with Callan Drood. Unfortunately she was dead at the book of book 2. (If it didn't take, it would have been nice to have an explanation of why.)The third one is about the secret Soviet science city,X37.In book 2,X37 was a Ghoulville that Harry Drood wiped out.But then in book 3, the spies are investigating X37 again and Eddie doesn't seem to why it looks like there was fighting there.(There was an glitch in earlier novels where Molly is described as someone who abducted aliens but later states she has never seen aliens because she deals with magic.Of course, she might have just said she had abducted aliens just to help her crazy and unpredictable reputation.)Found one more problem with series contiguity(unless I am not remembering correctly).Eddie says Giles Deathstalker taught them to pull up only part of the armor, such as making golden sunglasses to use their Sight.But I would swear eddie formed either just his helmet or his faceplate in a book before meeting the Deathstalker.Also sometimes they need to use the armor to use their Sight and other times they don't. Now after that last paragraph , you might think I am going to say I hated the book. Strangely enough I didn't hate it. More just let down that there that many problems from one of my favorite authors.In fact the story was very good. The Independent Agent is dying and decides to hold a contest to see who gets his collection of secrets.The six contestants are Eddie Drood (naturally), the Blue Fairy (who betrayed Eddie in the last book),Honey Lake(of the CIA),Peter King(indutrial espionage and grandson of the Independent Agent),Lethal Harmony of Kathmandu(femme fatale),and Walker from the Nightside(he does love crossover between his series).They have to investigate 5 mysteries which means they need to work together.Since their can be only one winner, it also means they need to watch their backs. The mysteries and their solutions are fun and the interactions of the characters are excellent(at least if they don't die too quickly).Walker is always a great character even when he is being a bastard.Their side trip to the Nightside was perfect.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zarin

    This is the third book in the series by Simon Green and as always a scientific fictional fantasy. Only this time there are many many incidents tied together and each different from the other. And there are many more interesting characters thrown together to give you much more than the previous one. As usual the book starts out with the introduction to Shaman, the drood and what all supernatural capabilities his torc gives him. The characters of the previous novel are given just a brief refresh an This is the third book in the series by Simon Green and as always a scientific fictional fantasy. Only this time there are many many incidents tied together and each different from the other. And there are many more interesting characters thrown together to give you much more than the previous one. As usual the book starts out with the introduction to Shaman, the drood and what all supernatural capabilities his torc gives him. The characters of the previous novel are given just a brief refresh and then the story proceeds directly towards its brand new plot. The new characters introduced are nice and well characterised. So, the plot is that the independent agent Alexander King is on his deathbed and he intends to pass on his huge booty of secrets to the greatest agent. To choose the greatest he calls upon six young agents to compete for the prized possession. They have to solve five great mysteries and prove their worth. The ride through the five mysteries was a hell of a ride. Yes. The mysteries were not entirely fictional but were woven around real mysteries being the Loch Ness monster, the swamp monster, the Tunguska event, the Philadelphia experiment and the Roswell UFO incident. Sounds interesting doesn’t it? Well yes, it is. Of all the mysteries, the Tunguska event was very spooky and so well described that I had goosebumps. Imagine your worst dreams coming alive! The others were no match to this one incident. The Roswell incident did come close towards the end. But, as compared to the previous novel’s excitement, thrill and climax this one fell short. The climax of this story was more of anti-climax. The last fight being rather boring and non eventful. Though the plot integrated the various mysteries well, not all of them were as detailed and well described as the Tunguska event. As this event set the benchmark, the others almost followed a declining route all the way towards the end. I’d say not as great as the previous but definitely an enjoyable read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

    Another fun book in this series. Mystery, Back Stabbing spy world fun.

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