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Beowulf

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This exhilarating graphic-novel edition of an ancient classic honors the spirit of the original as it attracts modern readers. The epic tale of the great warrior Beowulf has thrilled readers through the ages — and now it is reinvented for a new generation with Gareth Hinds’s masterful illustrations. Grendel’s black blood runs thick as Beowulf defeats the monster and his hid This exhilarating graphic-novel edition of an ancient classic honors the spirit of the original as it attracts modern readers. The epic tale of the great warrior Beowulf has thrilled readers through the ages — and now it is reinvented for a new generation with Gareth Hinds’s masterful illustrations. Grendel’s black blood runs thick as Beowulf defeats the monster and his hideous mother, while somber hues overcast the hero’s final, fatal battle against a raging dragon. Speeches filled with courage and sadness, lightning-paced contests of muscle and will, and funeral boats burning on the fjords are all rendered in glorious and gruesome detail. Told for more than a thousand years, Beowulf’s heroic saga finds a true home in this graphic-novel edition.


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This exhilarating graphic-novel edition of an ancient classic honors the spirit of the original as it attracts modern readers. The epic tale of the great warrior Beowulf has thrilled readers through the ages — and now it is reinvented for a new generation with Gareth Hinds’s masterful illustrations. Grendel’s black blood runs thick as Beowulf defeats the monster and his hid This exhilarating graphic-novel edition of an ancient classic honors the spirit of the original as it attracts modern readers. The epic tale of the great warrior Beowulf has thrilled readers through the ages — and now it is reinvented for a new generation with Gareth Hinds’s masterful illustrations. Grendel’s black blood runs thick as Beowulf defeats the monster and his hideous mother, while somber hues overcast the hero’s final, fatal battle against a raging dragon. Speeches filled with courage and sadness, lightning-paced contests of muscle and will, and funeral boats burning on the fjords are all rendered in glorious and gruesome detail. Told for more than a thousand years, Beowulf’s heroic saga finds a true home in this graphic-novel edition.

30 review for Beowulf

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I read Beowulf in School and I remember thinking this was a good story. It had it's mythical overtones, but the language was not modern and I had a hard time making concrete pictures in my head of what was really happening in this epic famous poem. I think this works so well in Graphic novel form. It's perfect and I just became a huge fan of Gareth Hinds for bringing this amazing story to life. The colors and details in the art are amazing. The story is full of action and that Viking mentality. I read Beowulf in School and I remember thinking this was a good story. It had it's mythical overtones, but the language was not modern and I had a hard time making concrete pictures in my head of what was really happening in this epic famous poem. I think this works so well in Graphic novel form. It's perfect and I just became a huge fan of Gareth Hinds for bringing this amazing story to life. The colors and details in the art are amazing. The story is full of action and that Viking mentality. Beowulf was the first superhero. He lived by his honor code. He's quite the figure. The ending is so perfect for a Viking story. This is a work of art. It takes the ancient poem and makes this story very modern and it sits easily along any other story today really.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    When I initially read this it was the first graphic version of the epic tale that I had read. Mostly visual, with little words to help us, it seemed to be a great adjunct to the teaching/reading of the story we read in British Literature classes. Colorful, poetic. Now that I have seen Santiago Garcia and David Rubin's version, which gets at more of Beowulf's story and captures more of the drama and power, I am inclined to say this is still good artwork, and maybe still the best I have seen of Hi When I initially read this it was the first graphic version of the epic tale that I had read. Mostly visual, with little words to help us, it seemed to be a great adjunct to the teaching/reading of the story we read in British Literature classes. Colorful, poetic. Now that I have seen Santiago Garcia and David Rubin's version, which gets at more of Beowulf's story and captures more of the drama and power, I am inclined to say this is still good artwork, and maybe still the best I have seen of Hinds's classics adaptations, but not as effective as this newer (2016) Beowulf.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Snatched this up at the recent Gathersburg Book Festival, saying aloud to myself, "Shut UP, there is a GRAPHIC NOVEL of BEOWULF?!" Yes, yes there is! So I'm giving this book four stars because it's a GRAPHIC NOVEL OF BEOWULF. And it's done very beautifully, the art is amazing and freaky! But I wanted to love it more, and what I didn't love was the text. I would have killed to see Tolkien's or Seamus Heaney's translation used, something nice and poetic and in the spirit of the original. But it re Snatched this up at the recent Gathersburg Book Festival, saying aloud to myself, "Shut UP, there is a GRAPHIC NOVEL of BEOWULF?!" Yes, yes there is! So I'm giving this book four stars because it's a GRAPHIC NOVEL OF BEOWULF. And it's done very beautifully, the art is amazing and freaky! But I wanted to love it more, and what I didn't love was the text. I would have killed to see Tolkien's or Seamus Heaney's translation used, something nice and poetic and in the spirit of the original. But it reads more like a synopsis of Beowulf. Occasionally you get the poetic language, and then it fades out entirely in favor of the pictures (which is good, it's a graphic novel, that's the way it's supposed to be), but then there's a jarring block of plain text again: then they did this, this, this, this. I think Hinds needed to up his game with the text to match his pictures, which had a greeny-brown palette and looked like old wood carvings (in other words, amazing).

  4. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    I never thought of Beowulf as a superhero story... but it surely is. Gareth Hinds shows that the graphic novel media is perfect for telling this story to modern audiences. These drawings would be even more amazing in large format. The book is well designed, carefully laid out and printed on a good grade of glossy paper.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This graphic novel was included in the 2008 YALSA list. Gareth Hinds does graphics for computer games and apparently reinvents classics as graphic novels in his spare time. He’s done Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice” and “King Lear” and just published The Odyssey in January. The illustrations of Beowulf and Grendel on the front and back covers indicate that the drawings will be dark and gritty. I’m hoping for a more creative classic adaptation than P&P&Zombies — something that could perhaps This graphic novel was included in the 2008 YALSA list. Gareth Hinds does graphics for computer games and apparently reinvents classics as graphic novels in his spare time. He’s done Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice” and “King Lear” and just published The Odyssey in January. The illustrations of Beowulf and Grendel on the front and back covers indicate that the drawings will be dark and gritty. I’m hoping for a more creative classic adaptation than P&P&Zombies — something that could perhaps be used to hook student interest or as part of an Old English or epic poem reading ladder. First page — Tiny-headed Beowulf looks like a cross between Zeus and The Hulk. He also appears to be decomposing. This must be a foreshadowing. End of Book I — Hinds devoted 20 full pages to the gruesome battle between Beowulf (clad in a manly loincloth and helmet) and Grendel (looking like one of Tolkein’s uruk-hai). Bones were shattered, blood was shed, and then Grendel runs away with one less arm than he came with. Eww. End of Book II — Another gruesome set of battle scenes between Beowulf and Grendel’s mother, who puts up a better fight than her son did. Beware the momma bear. Hinds snuck an image of 9/11 into Hrothgar’s speech warning Beowulf against pride, which I find to be in poor taste and unnecessarily political. Of the text included, Hinds managed to find a pretty good balance between readability and the beauty and cadence of Old English poetry, but it would still be difficult for low readers. I liked that he gave each book a distinct color scheme — the first, mostly light browns and black; the second, light browns, red, and greenish-blues for the water-lair; the third and final, purplish-gray and white. The colors lent emotion and tone to the story. This adaptation simplifies the tale of Beowulf and breaks it down into three easy-to-grasp events. It could be used to introduce the story or as a tool of struggling readers, but I don’t know that I’d necessarily recommend it to teachers or students to read just for kicks. I’m very curious, though, to take a look at his adaptation of The Odyssey. Side note: I have a difficult time with Children’s and YA authors who try to persuade their readers to think or believe a certain way. Steve Augurde, a British children’s author, wrote a blog post about the fact that children’s authors function as a kind of babysitter to kids and as such, they need to feel a keen sense of responsibility for what they are communicating to those kids. “Children are susceptible. As an audience they're relatively easy to scare, manipulate, and indoctrinate. I feel that children's fiction writers therefore have to be particularly conscious and careful of what they say.” More and more often I encounter educators justifying the political indoctrination of their students instead of working relentlessly to teach students how to think for themselves. I see the same thing in literature, in music, in the words coming out of mouths of celebrities -- people marketing their beliefs the way we market jeans. It's no wonder the country is a mess.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Beautiful drawings! The story line is much easier to understand then the original poem.

  7. 5 out of 5

    R.S. Carter

    It's missing a lot of the prose, but still a nice collector's edition for Beowulf fans. It's missing a lot of the prose, but still a nice collector's edition for Beowulf fans.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lexy

    This book was not as good as I thought it was going to be

  9. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Through detailed artwork, artist and story teller, Gareth Hinds creatively brings the classic epic poem of Beowulf to life on the pages of this graphic novel. The legend of Beowulf itself isn't a terribly exciting one, though. Beowulf is certainly heroic as he battles the formidable Grendel, Grendel's mother and a fearsome dragon before he ultimately perishes. If there is a lesson to be learned from Beowulf and his story, however, I'm afraid it escapes me, hence the three star rating. Through detailed artwork, artist and story teller, Gareth Hinds creatively brings the classic epic poem of Beowulf to life on the pages of this graphic novel. The legend of Beowulf itself isn't a terribly exciting one, though. Beowulf is certainly heroic as he battles the formidable Grendel, Grendel's mother and a fearsome dragon before he ultimately perishes. If there is a lesson to be learned from Beowulf and his story, however, I'm afraid it escapes me, hence the three star rating.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David

    2.75 I have always wanted to read Beowulf and so when I saw this graphic novel I thought I would give it a shot. I think I should have stuck to reading Beowulf as this version bit if more than it could handle. It felt like I was reading spark notes on the spark notes of Beowulf. I think this is a situation where this doesn't translate into a graphic novel. The art was interesting and I am glad I read it, but it just seems as if it is missing too much. 2.75 I have always wanted to read Beowulf and so when I saw this graphic novel I thought I would give it a shot. I think I should have stuck to reading Beowulf as this version bit if more than it could handle. It felt like I was reading spark notes on the spark notes of Beowulf. I think this is a situation where this doesn't translate into a graphic novel. The art was interesting and I am glad I read it, but it just seems as if it is missing too much.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    The art in this was great, but honestly the storytelling fell a bit flat in terms of writing. It's the Beowulf story I expected, so there's not much new here, but the illustrations are really nice. There's some really great double-page spreads that you can't look away from too. The art in this was great, but honestly the storytelling fell a bit flat in terms of writing. It's the Beowulf story I expected, so there's not much new here, but the illustrations are really nice. There's some really great double-page spreads that you can't look away from too.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kavitha Sivakumar

    An extremely simplified version of Beowulf in graphic form. An extra star is for the unusual and intriguing illustrations.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    I really enjoyed this. My love for Beowulf is still relatively recent (I never read it in high school just college) but this was another wonderfukl reminder as to why I appreciate ancient literature. Gareth Hinds has a wonderous ability to translate the tone of classic narratives into the contemporary medium of comics, and while his form was not as solid as it was in his version of The Odyssey, I still found as a fan of Bewoluf plenty to appreciate in this book. This graphic novel will likely be I really enjoyed this. My love for Beowulf is still relatively recent (I never read it in high school just college) but this was another wonderfukl reminder as to why I appreciate ancient literature. Gareth Hinds has a wonderous ability to translate the tone of classic narratives into the contemporary medium of comics, and while his form was not as solid as it was in his version of The Odyssey, I still found as a fan of Bewoluf plenty to appreciate in this book. This graphic novel will likely be read by students looking to avoid reading the original source material (shame on you btw if that you Beowulf is awesome), but fans of comics, as well as the original epic, should take a chance on this book as there's more than plenty of enough to enjoy. Gareth Hinds continues to remind me that comics, as a medium, is capable of so much. If nothing else it can take stories as old as memory and make them into something new.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cwn_annwn_13

    This is a portion of translations of Beowulf accompanied by art done in the comic book veign. I thought the art captured the feel of Beowulf very well. I actually went out of my to buy a hardcover edition of this after already having the trade paperback a few years back.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    Let me just say that I am completely biased when it comes to Beowulf. I love Beowulf! However, I felt that this graphic novel made the story more accessible and 'real,' in a way. Let me just say that I am completely biased when it comes to Beowulf. I love Beowulf! However, I felt that this graphic novel made the story more accessible and 'real,' in a way.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Raven Lucero

    4.5/5 stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jason Furman

    I love Gareth Hinds' graphic adaptations of classics, The Iliad and The Odyssey: A Graphic Novel are particularly spectacular and shocking faithful renderings of these two books in muscular form. Beowulf appears to be his first book and it is not nearly as good as what follows but still is nicely drawn and nicely shortened and worth reading. I love Gareth Hinds' graphic adaptations of classics, The Iliad and The Odyssey: A Graphic Novel are particularly spectacular and shocking faithful renderings of these two books in muscular form. Beowulf appears to be his first book and it is not nearly as good as what follows but still is nicely drawn and nicely shortened and worth reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    my teacher lost this piece of shit and thinks I stole it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Garden

    Roger gave me this when we were in Madison earlier this month and it's terrific. Roger gave me this when we were in Madison earlier this month and it's terrific.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Devon

    This is a hard book to review. Beowulf is one of my areas of study, so I tend to be more of a stickler than I might be with other subjects, but I am also interested in seeing different interpretations in art, especially comics and graphic novels, which I find an interesting and multifaceted genre. I wasn’t sure what to make of this retelling of Beowulf. The art was often hit and miss for me and there were a lot of choices I didn’t agree with, or didn’t understand. I’m not sure I agree with portr This is a hard book to review. Beowulf is one of my areas of study, so I tend to be more of a stickler than I might be with other subjects, but I am also interested in seeing different interpretations in art, especially comics and graphic novels, which I find an interesting and multifaceted genre. I wasn’t sure what to make of this retelling of Beowulf. The art was often hit and miss for me and there were a lot of choices I didn’t agree with, or didn’t understand. I’m not sure I agree with portraying everyone as blonde and blue-eyed, and the presence of the stereotypical viking helm (with horns) bugged me more than a little bit. The materiality pictured was often anachronistic, though I was intrigued by the choice of having the giant-forged sword in Grendel’s mother’s lair marked in cuneiform writing. Grendel and his mother were suitably monstrous, and I did enjoy the dark spatters across whole panes to indicate the wanton slaughter and maiming. Another artistic choice I thought particularly clever was having Beowulf’s journey to the bottom of Grendel’s mother’s pond in the background of pages that held the story leading up to that moment, which cause the action to leap to the forefront once Beowulf arrived in the cave. I don’t understand why the author chose to have the text - no matter whether a character was speaking or if it were narration - only in square blocks that sometimes took up the majority of a frame or page. There was the occasional change in font to indicate the Seer (in part three) was talking, but the change wasn’t dramatic enough to be immediately noticeable (at least not for me). I also thought it entirely unnecessary and outright confusing to have a misty vision of New York city in the background during Hrothgar’s farewell speech. I couldn’t figure out what the author was trying to convey with that, and, as there were no ties to it throughout the text, it should have been left out entirely. It was really jarring. What really gets me about the whole thing is the lack of nuance and, I think, understanding of the source material. A lot of what makes the text of Beowulf so compelling are tensions in the words and what is understood by them. For example, Grendel is called “ellengæst”, which can be translated to something like “noble stranger”, “valourous creature”. The “ellen” is the same as in “hū þā æðelingas ellen fremedon” in the first line. Why did the original author choose to name Grendel that way, when he’s an outcast, monstrous murderer? The possibilities that stir in that one description! Also in the motivation for Grendel’s actions: the rise of civilization caused by Hrothgar’s building of Heorot. And in the death-visions of the woman at Beowulf’s funeral, entirely absent from the comic. Granted, it would be difficult to know these things reading Beowulf in a modern English translation, but I don’t think it would be difficult to discover them, or engage with the text in a more meaningful way. I would have liked to see that meaningfulness of engagement in this comic retelling, but it was woefully absent.

  21. 5 out of 5

    William Galaini

    Beowulf is a difficult thing to review and perhaps even more difficult to accurately interpret given its multitude of translations and revisions with various intentions in mind. Approaching this material is a daunting task to the wise, and a futile task to the unwise. So which is artist Gareth Hinds? Wise or unwise? As we first open this volume, we are met with the illustrator's notes regarding the chosen translation as well as a vocabulary bank to help guide us through some of the more obtuse lan Beowulf is a difficult thing to review and perhaps even more difficult to accurately interpret given its multitude of translations and revisions with various intentions in mind. Approaching this material is a daunting task to the wise, and a futile task to the unwise. So which is artist Gareth Hinds? Wise or unwise? As we first open this volume, we are met with the illustrator's notes regarding the chosen translation as well as a vocabulary bank to help guide us through some of the more obtuse language. This is a welcome addition for high school students, rusty readers, and non-English majors. First we'll discuss the pallet. The dirty browns and beaten tans are offset by the flat metal glint of chain-mail and swords. The most vibrant colors are those of fire and sky; the flames and their emanating light bring life to the drab setting and the night sky is a deep and unworldly blue. All of this brings a dismal, haunting setting filled with hidden power. Next we'll discuss the character designs. Beowulf is a Grecian exaggeration of what is a traditional male warrior. This stock character is as boring a representation of Christendom as I've ever encountered. Hinds' interpretation of the titular character is faithful and no liberties are seemingly taken. But then we hit Grendel and Grendel's mother... and Hinds' work really shines. Never have I seen a better visual representation of the mother and her beastly brood. Their musculature, piercing eyes, and spindly hair makes them stand out in the drab colored setting while bringing life to the visual conflict between characters. I mean, look at this ... The art focuses on motion in many spots, generating a frantic elegance to the violence that the epic poem itself clumsily conveys in its various modern translations. If ever you scratched your head while reading the tale of Beowulf, simply peruse this comic. Not all is perfect, and despite Hinds' wise approach some things eluded him; namely the second, post-Grendel half of Beowulf. Those familiar with the epic poem would recognize the secondary portion of the tale as tacked-on and strongly influenced by Christian missionaries. There was nothing Gareth Hinds could really do with the material except change it. He takes some liberties with Beowulf himself, aging him properly and casting his face in tragic light but it isn't enough. I would have preferred Hinds take even more liberty with the visual language here and cast the material in a new light. Sadly, the latter-half of the poem is confusing and aimless despite a spectacular battle with a dragon. All in all, an excellent work and a worthy edition to not only the educational body of literature but also the casual reader.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cathleen

    I feel like I should start with the caveats. First, it's been 23 years since I read Beowulf, and though that senior high school English class where I was first introduced to the story was probably the most important academic event of my life, I remember little about the original epic poem save the most basic of plot points. Second, I feel vastly underqualified to review graphic literature. Though it's only recently getting the credit it deserves, this format has a rich tradition and requires exe I feel like I should start with the caveats. First, it's been 23 years since I read Beowulf, and though that senior high school English class where I was first introduced to the story was probably the most important academic event of my life, I remember little about the original epic poem save the most basic of plot points. Second, I feel vastly underqualified to review graphic literature. Though it's only recently getting the credit it deserves, this format has a rich tradition and requires exercising a special skill set to really appreciate it. One of the things I really like about Hinds's adaptation is related to my relative inexperience with graphic literature. It's been hard for me not to privilege words over images in the graphic novels and comics I've read, and I found myself doing just this as I started Beowulf. It quickly became apparent that I wasn't going to get away with it this time, though. I was irritated, at first, by how much Hinds was leaving out, but that forced me to be a better reader of his images. They were where I found the rest of the story, of course. Now, I'm not dumb. I knew the images were important, but my classically trained brain couldn't help but to focus primarily on the words -- until that strategy failed. Particularly smart and well done are the fight scenes with Grendel, Grendel's mother, and the dragon. These scenes are completely absent of text, but Hinds's illustrations are full of texture and meaning, thus telling the story as well as any accompanying text could have. This book truly illustrates the point that good graphic literature relies on text AND image to tell a story. The artwork is beautiful. I'd need to do a few more readings to fully figure out it's significance, but the colors begin in earthy browns and end in rich jewel tones. Hinds deftly conveys emotion in his choice of colors and his use of detail in the drawings. What I think Hinds's adaptation is missing is a complex understanding of the antagonists. Grendel, Grendel's mother, and the dragon are fairly one dimensional in their rage. I seem to remember much more complexity and maybe a little ambiguity in terms of evil/not evil in the original poem. Hinds tells the story exclusively from Beowulf's point of view and therefore loses the opportunity for a richer, fuller exploration. The Hinds version, though, has enlivened the story for me and does make me want to reread the original. In my book, that makes this successful.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rich Farrell

    The king of heroic epics gets a lavish visual interpretation in Hinds's full-color mixed-media gem, originally self-published as three separate issues in 2000. He begins with a credit to two versions of the familiar story (A.J. Church's 1904 translation and that of Francis Gummere), in which a vicious monster named Grendel terrorizes the great hall of King Hrothgar for 12 winters, and the hero Beowulf arrives from afar, to try to defeat the creature and succeeds—with his bare hands. Then he must The king of heroic epics gets a lavish visual interpretation in Hinds's full-color mixed-media gem, originally self-published as three separate issues in 2000. He begins with a credit to two versions of the familiar story (A.J. Church's 1904 translation and that of Francis Gummere), in which a vicious monster named Grendel terrorizes the great hall of King Hrothgar for 12 winters, and the hero Beowulf arrives from afar, to try to defeat the creature and succeeds—with his bare hands. Then he must contend with Grendel's mother, when she comes to avenge her son's fate; the third chapter deals with the mournful end to the hero's life, resulting from a battle with an enormous dragon. Each chapter begins with a brief narrative (paying homage to the cadences of the story's early verse renditions), before giving way to a lengthy, wordless and bloody battle. Hinds's angular perspectives and unusual color palettes (dark, ruddy colors, deep burgundy blood, and not a ray of sunshine in sight) lend the book an almost overwhelming sense of menace. The third and most emotionally forceful chapter centers around an incredible two-page spread that shows the dragon awakening; it's an arresting image in a book filled with many. For fantasy fans both young and old, this makes an ideal introduction to a story without which the entire fantasy genre would look very different; many scenes may be too intense for very young readers. Ages 10-up. (Apr.)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Take me back to a time where men where brave and monsters ruled the earth. Take me back and remind me that before the skyscrapers and the planes and the ships there where vessels, hovels, and Lords. I have this thought quite often. I love history ( beyond AP USA) and am often drawn to novels which depict hero's in their prime. Beowulf is possibly the most powerful of all these epics. Not only does it pull you in with its vivid story but it itself is a testament to the changing english language. Jus Take me back to a time where men where brave and monsters ruled the earth. Take me back and remind me that before the skyscrapers and the planes and the ships there where vessels, hovels, and Lords. I have this thought quite often. I love history ( beyond AP USA) and am often drawn to novels which depict hero's in their prime. Beowulf is possibly the most powerful of all these epics. Not only does it pull you in with its vivid story but it itself is a testament to the changing english language. Just look at how many times this book has been reproduced. It is constantly being read, always being reanalyzed. That is the sign of an epic if there ever was one Beowulf is the story of one valiant warrior as he moves from his humble beginnings toward the end of his life. He is a brave thane then a powerful king, slaying the beasts that terrifying the world. He travels to the aid of the people that need him and lunges into danger with the perseverance and swiftness of a hero. I am making this review short because I have to get back to the essay I have to write on this book ( it was assigned to me as a part of my major English writings Class) but you should read this if you want to get pulled back in a different time. Not only the behavior but the words themselves reflect a hero's battle and ultimate triumph. A beautiful peace of literature if I have ever seen one.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tom Ward

    An unfortunate telling of Beowulf, lacking all the nuances that make the story great. The main focus is Beowulf's three fights against Grendel, Grendel's Mother, and the Dragon. The first two books, those about Grendel and Grendel's Mother, are hard to read because the art is so messy and the panels are arranged so that people unfamiliar with the poem would probably have a tough time. The artwork in the third book is much better, and the dragon is well done. Hinds did leave quite a bit of direct An unfortunate telling of Beowulf, lacking all the nuances that make the story great. The main focus is Beowulf's three fights against Grendel, Grendel's Mother, and the Dragon. The first two books, those about Grendel and Grendel's Mother, are hard to read because the art is so messy and the panels are arranged so that people unfamiliar with the poem would probably have a tough time. The artwork in the third book is much better, and the dragon is well done. Hinds did leave quite a bit of direct translation of the poem in, which is nice, but it was done too half-heartedly. To translate Beowulf into a worthy graphic novel, one would need much more than Hinds' 120 pages. The most laudable thing about this work is that it attempts to bring the classic poem to the attention of young adults. Also, there's a really unnecessary image of (I think) New York City overlaying Hrothgar's farewell speech, and it is completely out of place, and doesn't even fit well thematically. That one I just don't get...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jshifrin1

    A world wear monsters and dragons roam the earth terrorizing human kind there is a hero who was born to slay them his name Beowulf. This place exists in the graphic novel Beowulf by Gareth Hinds, based on the poem Beowulf. This book takes place in 1000 A.D. is about a warrior who slays beasts and monsters to defend his people. In the beginning of the book Beowulf enters as the prince of a far away land he has come to free Hrothgar’s great hall from the beast Grendal. This is just one example of A world wear monsters and dragons roam the earth terrorizing human kind there is a hero who was born to slay them his name Beowulf. This place exists in the graphic novel Beowulf by Gareth Hinds, based on the poem Beowulf. This book takes place in 1000 A.D. is about a warrior who slays beasts and monsters to defend his people. In the beginning of the book Beowulf enters as the prince of a far away land he has come to free Hrothgar’s great hall from the beast Grendal. This is just one example of the three grate adventures Beowulf went on, he also fought Grendal’s mother and a ferocious dragon. This is a very good book but a little graphic but very vivid. I think this book is amazing, though the text was a little difficult to understand. This book itself has not been around very long but the story of Beowulf has existed since 700 A.D. this story is timeless and full of action no matter what age you are it can appeal to you.

  27. 4 out of 5

    A.E. Marling

    Beowulf is a superhero of a bygone era, tackling monsters with his bare hands. So strong was he that swords broke whenever he hit people with them, “so they conferred no great advantage.” I loved the brutally beautiful phrasing. To speak, Beowulf “unlocked his word hoard.” He entered the hall, and “majesty lodged there.” He wore armor of “webbed mail.” He battled a dragon with “molten venom,” who was “threatening the night sky with streamers of fire.” When Beowulf crushed someone, he “wrecked his Beowulf is a superhero of a bygone era, tackling monsters with his bare hands. So strong was he that swords broke whenever he hit people with them, “so they conferred no great advantage.” I loved the brutally beautiful phrasing. To speak, Beowulf “unlocked his word hoard.” He entered the hall, and “majesty lodged there.” He wore armor of “webbed mail.” He battled a dragon with “molten venom,” who was “threatening the night sky with streamers of fire.” When Beowulf crushed someone, he “wrecked his bone-house.” And last but far from least awesome: “Withergeld.” That’s not to say the story was any good by today’s standards. It was meandering, repetitious and disjointed. Neil Gaimen helped hammer the tale into a single battle-worthy arc in the 2007 movie.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Although this is not a verbatum version of the Beowulf saga, it is an excellent version for those unfamiliar with the original text/translation or for those who want to read a more accessible version of the story. The artistry is superb and illustrates the story well. Each of the sections has a slightly different feel to it, giving the reader a clear sense of divide between each of the epic challenges Beowulf faces. I did find some scenes difficult to follow but this is more related to the fact Although this is not a verbatum version of the Beowulf saga, it is an excellent version for those unfamiliar with the original text/translation or for those who want to read a more accessible version of the story. The artistry is superb and illustrates the story well. Each of the sections has a slightly different feel to it, giving the reader a clear sense of divide between each of the epic challenges Beowulf faces. I did find some scenes difficult to follow but this is more related to the fact that I am unfamiliar with the layout of graphic novels and not due to the work itself. An excellent version of the Beowulf saga, making it accessible to all.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris Bass

    Great read along with the full version. If anyone is interested, I wrote a grad paper comparing the traditional text and graphic novel. Also, I met Hinds at NCTE, and I realized that I knew a little too much about him.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Micahb

    I hadn't read this since 9th grade. I think it was easier when I was reading it with the class and talking about it with the teacher. Still, a good story (even if there are are a few too many sidenotes). I hadn't read this since 9th grade. I think it was easier when I was reading it with the class and talking about it with the teacher. Still, a good story (even if there are are a few too many sidenotes).

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