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Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules: Separating Fact from Fiction, and the Science of Everyday Life

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Quacks and pundits beware! The internet is a powerful beast when it comes to science; the answer to any query you may have is just a few keystrokes away. But when there are multiple answers from various sources, how do we know what information is reliable? In Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules, bestselling author Dr. Joe Schwarcz takes a critical look at how facts are miscon Quacks and pundits beware! The internet is a powerful beast when it comes to science; the answer to any query you may have is just a few keystrokes away. But when there are multiple answers from various sources, how do we know what information is reliable? In Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules, bestselling author Dr. Joe Schwarcz takes a critical look at how facts are misconstrued in the media. He debunks the myths surrounding canned food, artificial dyes, SPF, homeopathy, cancer, chemicals, and much more. Unafraid to expose the sheer nonsense people are led to believe about health, food, drugs, and our environment, Dr. Joe confronts pseudoscience and convincingly and entertainingly advocates for a scientific approach to everyday life.


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Quacks and pundits beware! The internet is a powerful beast when it comes to science; the answer to any query you may have is just a few keystrokes away. But when there are multiple answers from various sources, how do we know what information is reliable? In Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules, bestselling author Dr. Joe Schwarcz takes a critical look at how facts are miscon Quacks and pundits beware! The internet is a powerful beast when it comes to science; the answer to any query you may have is just a few keystrokes away. But when there are multiple answers from various sources, how do we know what information is reliable? In Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules, bestselling author Dr. Joe Schwarcz takes a critical look at how facts are misconstrued in the media. He debunks the myths surrounding canned food, artificial dyes, SPF, homeopathy, cancer, chemicals, and much more. Unafraid to expose the sheer nonsense people are led to believe about health, food, drugs, and our environment, Dr. Joe confronts pseudoscience and convincingly and entertainingly advocates for a scientific approach to everyday life.

30 review for Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules: Separating Fact from Fiction, and the Science of Everyday Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Angie Reisetter

    I loved this book, but it wasn't what I thought it was going to be. I thought it would give some advice on how to sort through nonsense on the web, how to tell an authoritative source from a nonsensical one. Instead, the answer seems to be that Dr. Joe is an authoritative source, so we should just read his stuff. So all in all, the combination of the blurb and the approach of the book are a little, well, hubristic? off-putting? But that only shows up in the introduction, the blurb, and the conclu I loved this book, but it wasn't what I thought it was going to be. I thought it would give some advice on how to sort through nonsense on the web, how to tell an authoritative source from a nonsensical one. Instead, the answer seems to be that Dr. Joe is an authoritative source, so we should just read his stuff. So all in all, the combination of the blurb and the approach of the book are a little, well, hubristic? off-putting? But that only shows up in the introduction, the blurb, and the conclusion. Between the intro and conclusion, there are many short articles on chemistry-related news items and rumors, setting the record straight. And Schwarcz's voice is them is, for the most part, really very enjoyable. He gets rather snappish when Dr. Oz and the Food Babe come up, but when he's talking chemistry, he just talks chemistry, and I really enjoy it. He doesn't apologize for offending folks, though. If you're a fan of homeopathy, acupressure, or, yes, Dr. Oz, you're not gonna like his take on them. But he is consistently scientific, looking for evidence over conjecture. The result is a set of short essays on most of the chemistry-related issues I've thought about over the last year or so. Okay, not all of them, but many of them that have come up in the news. The book is divided roughly into thirds: first, thoughts on food and nutrition, second, some basic chemistry and chemists (history), and third, medicine drugs, and various and other sundry topics. Including the Food Babe. Like most chemists I know, he resents that somehow "chemicals" have become villains in our culture, and often he asks what we would have left if we eliminated chemicals from our lives. Fair enough. He's Canadian, so he often sites their Canada Health tests for the safety of food additives, or complains about their policies, which is a fresh break from FDA-bashing for me. Some of the articles focus on practical, useful things, like what sunscreen actually does, or that we should wash cantaloupes before cutting. Others are more random, but interesting and still chemistry related. A history of the German Bayer company, or stressing the early chemistry interest of Alan Turing (back off! he's our computation guy, not a chemist!). The brevity of the pieces and the lack of any real link between successive pieces (except at the very end) makes it a little hard to read in long sessions, but as a short, informative, easy read, I recommend it. I got a copy of the ebook from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lili

    From Netgalley for a Review: I wanted to like this book, I love the idea of taking a hard look at some of the really preposterous myths floating around the internet, especially the ones relating to outrageous health claims. I loathe them, I hate the way they are usually set up to take advantage of people who are desperate for a solution to a health problem or afraid for their health, or possibly even worse...these people are just plain stupid and think they know the solution to a problem because From Netgalley for a Review: I wanted to like this book, I love the idea of taking a hard look at some of the really preposterous myths floating around the internet, especially the ones relating to outrageous health claims. I loathe them, I hate the way they are usually set up to take advantage of people who are desperate for a solution to a health problem or afraid for their health, or possibly even worse...these people are just plain stupid and think they know the solution to a problem because it worked for them and they have discovered the miracle cure and want to share it. Ugh, the furry! However, I loathe the other side just as equally, the side that treats the people who make the mistake of believing the internet searches and tv doctors like they are complete idiots worthy of contempt. The people that think that their way is the only way and anything else is foolish. The book started out seeming like an even split, having annoyance at people like Food Babe and Dr. Oz, but leaving the people who made the mistake of getting caught up in their diatribe alone. Later though it starts treating them with the same contempt. Now I am not saying that this book is bad, I loved the information presented, I enjoyed the scientific explanations of why things do and do not work, and how small blips of data on a research project get blown out of proportion something fierce. I would have liked to see more sources, since the internet is such a hard place to navigate and all that, why not include a list of links that back the information you are giving us. By expecting us to just take your word at face value are you not putting us in the same category as the people who just believe Dr Oz and his ilk? Really, I just did not like the author's tone, it was arrogant and frankly I would rather just read a text book or long winded research paper, because at least I wouldn't have to deal with the level of arrogance and condescension. In my opinion, it is not the way to educate and spread knowledge.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lauralee

    I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. This was interesting, plainly written, and provided great explanations for the questions and topics covered. I also thoroughly enjoyed the scathing indictment of Doctor Oz, the master of pseudo-science. I think the only Con I see with this book is that it doesn't provide a lot of resources to do further research on your own if you want to learn more. If I hadn't been committed to writing a review, I would have prefer I received this book through a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for an honest review. This was interesting, plainly written, and provided great explanations for the questions and topics covered. I also thoroughly enjoyed the scathing indictment of Doctor Oz, the master of pseudo-science. I think the only Con I see with this book is that it doesn't provide a lot of resources to do further research on your own if you want to learn more. If I hadn't been committed to writing a review, I would have preferred this book as a bathroom book. The chapters/ideas are short and snappy, with not a lot of continuity between them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    The so-called "junk science" is everywhere now. It's easy to see another alarming heading on a newsfeed, easy to share and yet hard to analyze, so this collection of short articles explaining common misunderstandings and misrepresentations, whether deliberate (I'll point at PETA's "chicken wing" statements here) or unintentional, is very welcome. It's a good book for dipping into, one chapter at a time. It's also ideal for leaving in a communal area, or for chemistry teachers to inspire students The so-called "junk science" is everywhere now. It's easy to see another alarming heading on a newsfeed, easy to share and yet hard to analyze, so this collection of short articles explaining common misunderstandings and misrepresentations, whether deliberate (I'll point at PETA's "chicken wing" statements here) or unintentional, is very welcome. It's a good book for dipping into, one chapter at a time. It's also ideal for leaving in a communal area, or for chemistry teachers to inspire students and show the relevance of chemistry in the real world. (The point, as Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules shows, is that chemistry is everywhere, and rarely separated from the other sciences.) Don't expect snappy "top ten" lists, but do expect straightforward explanations of the science behind the myth, and the flaws and fallacies. "Natural does not mean "healthy", but equally "scientific" does not mean "right", and Schwarcz debunks some of the more pervasive myths on fairly much every topic from food to health and the history of medicine. He educates us with real science, giving practical solutions (or real issues to worry about). There's enough science for geeks, but it's easily understood - or skipped - for a layman. (My eyes did glaze a little during some of the more detailed explanations.) And it's not just scientific debunking. Quite often it's just a matter of pointing out statistical fallacies or misrepresentations, such as 65% decreases that sound wonderful... until you realize the original figure was miniscule to begin with. He doesn't hesitate to call out fear-mongering celebrities such as Dr. Oz and The Food Babe who mangle science in an effort to garner publicity, instead filling us with facts to delight random trivia buffs. It's almost like a guided tour through a "Popular Science" wiki. He points out the hypocrisy of human thinking, where we'll studiously avoid "chemicals" in one area and then saturate ourselves in them somewhere else, and the irresponsibility of manipulating data and studies to fit an agenda, and isn't averse to admitting that sometimes we just don't have an answer... yet. In short, it's about putting science in context, understanding the hype, and having some awareness of how statistics can be manipulated. The writing seems balanced, and is easy to read. Each segment can be read in isolation, having its own introduction and snappy finish, offering a clear conclusion where possible. Schwarcz might be considered the Bill Bryson for chemistry. There's a good index at the end, too, so you can easily find the science to refute whatever histrionic scare might pop up next. Disclaimer: I received a free copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    I enjoyed this book, but not nearly as much as I would have if: a) it featured a bibliography. b) it weren't riddled with strawman arguments. The entire premise of the book is the debunking of pseudoscience and commonly held misconceptions. I have a science background, enough of one to be familiar with a lot of the material discussed by Dr. Joe. I also have a skeptic's fascination with alternative medicine, which covered a lot of the rest of it. He actually did a pretty good job with the chemistr I enjoyed this book, but not nearly as much as I would have if: a) it featured a bibliography. b) it weren't riddled with strawman arguments. The entire premise of the book is the debunking of pseudoscience and commonly held misconceptions. I have a science background, enough of one to be familiar with a lot of the material discussed by Dr. Joe. I also have a skeptic's fascination with alternative medicine, which covered a lot of the rest of it. He actually did a pretty good job with the chemistry, and a mostly accurate one on the alt med - but he constantly rips on the alternative medicine and pseudoscience for not publishing studies, and for citing fake sources or fake quotes from real ones (when they cite any evidence at all), and then he himself does not bother to cite a damn thing. This is basically a book of stories that a cool prof might tell during the course of one of his or her lectures. I have a ton of those rattling around in my head, and I break them out all the time at get togethers and parties. They're uncommon knowledge, and you get to upset people's world view a little bit, what's not to love? But I've had a few of them turn out not to be true, because I didn't fact check. So just a word of advice, if you read this: beware of appeals to authority and the taking of things at face value - google for verification before you bust one of these out on someone.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike Smith

    I'd like to give this book a higher rating, but it didn't live up to the expectations set by the cover blurb. I expected Schwarcz to be harder hitting in debunking the myths that arise on the Internet about science and technology. I expected him to explain how to recognize misinformation when you find it online. Instead, it was a series of short (three to five pages) articles about topics in food safety, health, and chemistry in everyday life. Each article was well-written and informative, but t I'd like to give this book a higher rating, but it didn't live up to the expectations set by the cover blurb. I expected Schwarcz to be harder hitting in debunking the myths that arise on the Internet about science and technology. I expected him to explain how to recognize misinformation when you find it online. Instead, it was a series of short (three to five pages) articles about topics in food safety, health, and chemistry in everyday life. Each article was well-written and informative, but there wasn't much I wasn't already aware of (I have a science and engineering background and I read a lot). In addition, the heavy focus on chemistry (hence "molecules" in the title) doesn't do it for me (I prefer physics and biology). If you are already scientifically literate and you know how to filter out the nonsense online, there won't be much here for you. If you were hoping to learn how to filter out the nonsense, this book won't help you, in my opinion. If you're worried about whether science and big corporations are slowly poisoning you with chemicals, you may find information here that will set your mind at ease.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Unfortunately, despite the sub heading (Separating Fact from Fiction), Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules is better at pointing out fallacies then providing answers. You can read these short tales about science/food/health quackery and be entertained and informed at times. But do not depend upon Dr. Joe as a legitimate source for a paper or even an argument. As he points out in one story, just because it is in print does not mean it is true. Always, always verify! Especially when you are reading with Unfortunately, despite the sub heading (Separating Fact from Fiction), Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules is better at pointing out fallacies then providing answers. You can read these short tales about science/food/health quackery and be entertained and informed at times. But do not depend upon Dr. Joe as a legitimate source for a paper or even an argument. As he points out in one story, just because it is in print does not mean it is true. Always, always verify! Especially when you are reading with scientists writing outside their field of expertise. He makes some good points, but without the evidence he does not provide, this is a book to entertain or as an idea generator. Read at your own risk!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zeel

    I enjoyed this book but do have some qualms; the author clearly is knowledgable and did his research and I enjoyed the personal snarky comments he added throughout the book but I felt that he covered too many topics to quickly. Had he covered less topics but more in depth I think I may have enjoyed this more.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nick Null

    Meh

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sean Goh

    Interesting book with bite-sized tidbits of science. Easy to understand, conversational with snarky comments thrown in here and there. Can come across as arrogant at times. ___ Kekule: Let us learn to dream, then perhaps we shall find the truth. But let us beware of publishing our dreams till they have been tested by the waking understanding. Effective calories =/= calorie content as determined by conventional experimental methods. 100 calories from fat =/= 100 calories of carbohydrate. Wash the ou Interesting book with bite-sized tidbits of science. Easy to understand, conversational with snarky comments thrown in here and there. Can come across as arrogant at times. ___ Kekule: Let us learn to dream, then perhaps we shall find the truth. But let us beware of publishing our dreams till they have been tested by the waking understanding. Effective calories =/= calorie content as determined by conventional experimental methods. 100 calories from fat =/= 100 calories of carbohydrate. Wash the outside of fruit before cutting, even if the skin isn't normally eaten (e.g. honeydew). Cutting can transfer bacteria from the surface to the edible portion. Wash apples and eat the skin as well, for antioxidants (polyphenols). Mosquitos locate prey by smell. And the bacteria that produce foot smell are also found in Limburger cheese. Chocolate's smoothness is achieved by emulsifiers (soy lecithin, or now polyglycerol polyrincinoleate). Greek yogurt is yogurt that has the whey removed, so it has less carbs and greater concentration of protein. But the massive amount of whey extracted needs to be disposed of. It can't be dumped into water systems because it consumed dissolved oxygen when it biodegrades, starving aquatic life. Greek yogurt also needs 4 times as much milk to make as compared to regular yogurt. Napalm's name is a combination of naphthenic acid and palmitic acid, its original critical ingredients. Goldbeater's skin is a strong light sheet made from animal intestines that can be welded together by overlapping and gently rubbing to form a seamless, leakproof joint. Over a million cows contributed their intestines to the most famous dirigible, the Hindenburg. Chemicals affect us in many ways, like antibiotics curing infections, preservatives protect us from moldy food, detergents clean our clothes. Bisphenol A (BPA) has much controversy surrounding what effects it can have. Virtually every paper ends by calling for more research. The only conclusion the author is prepared to draw (w.r.t. plastics) is that routine heating of foods in plastics is not advisable. Cow milk yield and plant growth can be affected by soothing music (classical like Mozart). The most likely risk from (low energy i.e. microwave and longer wavelength) radiation sources is thermal burns from heating, but that only happens when standing very near high intensity transmitters like a TV station aerial. The inverse square law quickly attentuates the thermal effects with distance. When a cat rubs its cheeks against your leg, it is marking you as safe territory. Cat faces have pheremone secretions. If you buy a sunscreen that is "chemical-free", you are buying a vacuum. Use sunscreens to protect the skin when exposure is unavoidable, rather than to prolong exposure. There is no such thing as a healthy tan. In science credit should be attributed to the individual whose work has led directly to the development and application of the discovery. Beware surfaces contaminated by viruses and bacteria. While the tenets of homeopathy are marinated in pseudoscience, homeopaths can serve a useful function. They ask a plethora of caring questions and lend a sympathetic ear, both processes can translate to a reduction in stress and anxiety as the ailment naturally resolves. Chemical/Radiation breeding (scrambling genetic material of crops using abovementioned processes) has produced red grapefruit, and the barley that goes into premium Scotch whiskey.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    I enjoyed this book for the first third of it. In the second third, I couldn't concentrate and I was bored by the author's monotonous info-dump writing style. After a while, I got back into the content - which is good. However, when I reached the homeopathy chapter, I lost significant respect for this author due to his arrogant, increasingly vulgar, and disrespectful attitude towards anybody who doesn't agree with his particular views. He digresses into an angry barrage of abuses against anyone I enjoyed this book for the first third of it. In the second third, I couldn't concentrate and I was bored by the author's monotonous info-dump writing style. After a while, I got back into the content - which is good. However, when I reached the homeopathy chapter, I lost significant respect for this author due to his arrogant, increasingly vulgar, and disrespectful attitude towards anybody who doesn't agree with his particular views. He digresses into an angry barrage of abuses against anyone who holds a skepticism towards the monopoly that the scientific community has claimed as holders of unchanging truth and infallible evidence. As a biology BS myself, I disapprove of his unjust and derogatory treatment of people who, just as he recommends, don't jump on research-based bandwagons until evidence is confirmed, consistent, and applicable to the specific situation. His credentials do not withhold him from the same fallacies and ability to falter demonstrated by each case study in this book. However good the content and analysis, a dose of humility and a holding of oneself to the same standards one has used to scrutinize others would remove the bad aftertaste I have after this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Stowe

    I listened to the audio book and enjoyed it fine but found the narrative lacking. lots of interesting facts and upon reflection that was exactly what was advertised, I thought this was going to be a bit more focused content about a specific THING. Possibly it just wasn't for me man. I listened to the audio book and enjoyed it fine but found the narrative lacking. lots of interesting facts and upon reflection that was exactly what was advertised, I thought this was going to be a bit more focused content about a specific THING. Possibly it just wasn't for me man.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melissa MacLeod

    Very interesting read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Will Boncher

    Decent content, but just a bunch of snippets, and felt pretty repetitive.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave White

    Facts presented in an entertaining way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    As usual, Joe Schwarcz is informative and entertaining. The last couple of books of his I've read were very food-focused, so it was nice to get back to a broader mix of topics. As usual, Joe Schwarcz is informative and entertaining. The last couple of books of his I've read were very food-focused, so it was nice to get back to a broader mix of topics.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ayse

    Audiobook narrator was very boring - I like this kind of subject matter but it was hard to listen to

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lewis

    It was quite good, but a few essays seemed off topic. It was a little long therefore. Still worth reading, with plenty of interesting information.

  20. 4 out of 5

    A Reader's Heaven

    (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) The internet is a powerful beast when it comes to science; the answer to any query you may have is just a few keystrokes away. But when there are multiple answers from various sources, how do we know what information is reliable? In Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules, bestselling author Dr. Joe Schwarcz takes a critical look at how facts are misconstrued in the media. He debunks the myths surrounding canned food, a (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) The internet is a powerful beast when it comes to science; the answer to any query you may have is just a few keystrokes away. But when there are multiple answers from various sources, how do we know what information is reliable? In Monkeys, Myths, and Molecules, bestselling author Dr. Joe Schwarcz takes a critical look at how facts are misconstrued in the media. He debunks the myths surrounding canned food, artificial dyes, SPF, homeopathy, cancer, chemicals, and much more. Unafraid to expose the sheer nonsense people are led to believe about health, food, drugs, and our environment, Dr. Joe confronts pseudoscience and convincingly and entertainingly advocates for a scientific approach to everyday life. Ahhhh, the media - take a tiny pinprick of information, wrap it up in an agenda and we have a news story. People clamour over it cos "Dr. Oz" says it is cool - and, somehow, it is taken as fact by the general population and it becomes "the thing." You only have to look at the glut of dieting books over the last few decades to see that in action. This book sets out to deconstruct these mythological half-truths. And that is a good thing. Basically what we get here is a series of essay-style chapters that set out to stick to the science of food, health and dieting and applying scientific fact to many things we see around us today, from a chemistry standpoint. I liked the points put forward, enjoyed finding out why these myths start and what the real truths were. While all this is good and solid work, I did feel, at times, that the "science" was just a little much for me. A more "layman's" approach would have suited me better. I know that isn't always possible but I did get to a point where it was just too much for me and I put the book down and read something else. Overall, a great book for those interested in the sciences of life. Paul ARH

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Series of brief articles or blog posts about science, history, nutrition, and daily life. Although the articles are loosely grouped, they appear to be about random topics that struck the author's fancy. In general, his bent is to show that there's a lot of pseudo-science out there which inhibits good decision making. Also some interesting background on the origins of things we use in daily living. A fun read in between things, like an interesting conversation with someone who has done his resear Series of brief articles or blog posts about science, history, nutrition, and daily life. Although the articles are loosely grouped, they appear to be about random topics that struck the author's fancy. In general, his bent is to show that there's a lot of pseudo-science out there which inhibits good decision making. Also some interesting background on the origins of things we use in daily living. A fun read in between things, like an interesting conversation with someone who has done his research.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    While this was entertaining at times, and I did (potentially ) learn new things, this book did not add at all to my, or any reader's, ability to discern the truthfulness of any claim. In fact, the author made claims in the same manner and tone as many of the sources that he debunks. So while I may trust him as a source over others, I still feel the need to verify his claims independently, as I cannot do that based on his quoted research. While this was entertaining at times, and I did (potentially ) learn new things, this book did not add at all to my, or any reader's, ability to discern the truthfulness of any claim. In fact, the author made claims in the same manner and tone as many of the sources that he debunks. So while I may trust him as a source over others, I still feel the need to verify his claims independently, as I cannot do that based on his quoted research.

  23. 4 out of 5

    LillyBooks

    While I enjoyed the goal of this book, I found that for something written by a scientist and that is attempting to scientifically refute certain myths that it was not very deep. It felt too brief and shallow. I think the author may have been more concerned with brevity and maintaining that cheerful tone than in conveying hard science. It is possible to write a concise, accurate, educational book that presents truths in a positive light without winking through-out.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lexy

    I saw Joe Schwarzc on a local talk show and decided I would check out this book. I enjoyed the book but wish there was some kind of order or continuity to it. the topics that were tackled just seemed to be entered into randomly, there was no flow from chapter to chapter. The information presented in the book was interesting and educational but at times this artsy fartsy had a hard time understanding some of the underlying chemistry.

  25. 5 out of 5

    victor harris

    As the title indicates it attempts to distinguish science from pseudo-science. A broad range of topics are covered from food consumption to harmful chemicals and it offers interesting historical snapshots on how such myths and false cures evolved. Readers should be forewarned it contains very detailed discussions of biological and chemical structures, so it is challenging reading.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I have had to set this aside for now. I got about 1/3 of the way into it but it became overdue at the library and I was unable to renew. Nonfiction is a slog for me these days, although this is very interesting and I even read some aloud to my boyfriend. I do plan to pick it back up sometime, but for now, it remains Partially Read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susuluco

    For some reason I was expecting something different of this book. It is really science from everyday life. However, I did not find a good link between chapters, and some of the explanations were quite short for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Clemmer

    I thought the author did an excellent job of explaining how the science worked to help us better understand how the pseudoscientific community gets it wrong. Each chapter is more like an essay and easy to read in snippets.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shira

    Different parts of his book seem to give contradictory information about diet and various other areas of life. I found his writing entertaining, but the information/conclusions were contradictory.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rayfes Mondal

    Great collection of articles taking on misinformation on the internet regarding chemicals

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