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All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 6

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The sixth collection of the 1940s' greatest super-team, the Justice Society of America, sees the end of World War II. Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman and others star in these stories, which encapsulate the feelings of many Americans at the time. Among them are the anti-German "This Is Our Enemy!" and the touching "A Place in the World", which welcomed our t The sixth collection of the 1940s' greatest super-team, the Justice Society of America, sees the end of World War II. Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman and others star in these stories, which encapsulate the feelings of many Americans at the time. Among them are the anti-German "This Is Our Enemy!" and the touching "A Place in the World", which welcomed our troops home from overseas.


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The sixth collection of the 1940s' greatest super-team, the Justice Society of America, sees the end of World War II. Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman and others star in these stories, which encapsulate the feelings of many Americans at the time. Among them are the anti-German "This Is Our Enemy!" and the touching "A Place in the World", which welcomed our t The sixth collection of the 1940s' greatest super-team, the Justice Society of America, sees the end of World War II. Wonder Woman, the Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman and others star in these stories, which encapsulate the feelings of many Americans at the time. Among them are the anti-German "This Is Our Enemy!" and the touching "A Place in the World", which welcomed our troops home from overseas.

30 review for All Star Comics Archives, Vol. 6

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    If you like any of the stories here you're either a time traveling kid from the 40s or you were a kid reading these back then and you like remembering what it was to read silly stories. This one includes a bad guy that at the end of the issue he's explaining how he did what he did to our heroes and while he's doing so he collapses... So Green Lantern says: "he talked too much and he fainted. " Like SERIOUSLY. They also fight hungry robots from outer space that were peaceful but became hateful bec If you like any of the stories here you're either a time traveling kid from the 40s or you were a kid reading these back then and you like remembering what it was to read silly stories. This one includes a bad guy that at the end of the issue he's explaining how he did what he did to our heroes and while he's doing so he collapses... So Green Lantern says: "he talked too much and he fainted. " Like SERIOUSLY. They also fight hungry robots from outer space that were peaceful but became hateful because this bad guy told them so from earth. If you're stupid and you know it clap your hands!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    The JSA fights discrimination against the handicapped while also fighting off metal eating life forms from Jupiter. Oh. and perpetuate racist Anti German propaganda. But Wildcat makes a couple appearances and we see Mr Terrific for one issue, which is cool.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects Issue 24-28 of the Golden Age All-Star Comics. This included three issues where due to All American Comics deciding to separate from DC's characters, some regular members were banished and Green Lantern and Flash returned dropping their honorary member title. Issue #24: This Is Our Enemy: A man is unsure if fighting in the War is worth it, and so the Justice Society takes him on a tour through time highlighting all the cruelty and war-mongering in German history. It's War Propo This book collects Issue 24-28 of the Golden Age All-Star Comics. This included three issues where due to All American Comics deciding to separate from DC's characters, some regular members were banished and Green Lantern and Flash returned dropping their honorary member title. Issue #24: This Is Our Enemy: A man is unsure if fighting in the War is worth it, and so the Justice Society takes him on a tour through time highlighting all the cruelty and war-mongering in German history. It's War Propoganda, but it's fairly well done and enjoyable for what it is. Grade: A- Issue #25: The Mystery of the Forgotten Crime: A man comes to the Justice Society with a very bad case of amnesia, but he does remember that a man convicted of a crime was innocent of it and the Justice Society sets out to investigate. It's a fun, if cliched mystery with some over the top twists. It's still very enjoyable. Grade: B+ Issue #26: Vampires of the Void: The Justice Society takes on a group of metal eating monsters. This is a very traditional superhero story, but enjoyable and a lot of fun in its own right. Grade: B+ Issue #27 : A Place in the World: A lovely and life-affirming story regarding disability. It was very timely because many men returned from war with new disabilities. One of these was a focal point in the story, a football player who lost an arm in the War. Prior to the War he'd been a football player who'd looked down on his own disabled brother. Now, he found himself not being respected and having to be encouraged by his brother. He asks the Justice Society to help a group of young men with disabilities who were struggling with depression. The Justice responds by each having a disabled person assist them in their own unique way. It has a powerful for kids as well as affirming people with disabilities. There are problems you could point to if you wanted to be skeptical but it's heartfelt and particularly for the era, is a brilliant moving story. Grade; A+ Issue #28: A dying man asks the Justice Society to thwart a murder plot he set in motion. The would-be killer is an artist who sent paintings painted with paint that causes the subject to come to life at night. It's an insane concept leading up to amazing insane conclusion. My big problem is that the framing story of people in the future finding paints from the JSA that it says not to use is completely unnecessary. Grade; B+ Overall, these are some of the better All Star Comics stories. I think the limited quarterly publication schedule really does help them maintain quality writing, although the art is iffy at times, though that's to be expected from a book that was produced by a variety of freelancers. Still, this is a great collection full of sublime JSA goodness.

  4. 5 out of 5

    The other John

    Boy, what happened? As the stories in this volume were produced, World War II saw its final days and the quality of All-Star Comics plummeted. With the exception of the Hawkman sections, drawn by Joe Kubert, the art is pretty poor. The stories are a bit better--not some of Mr. Fox's better work, mind you--but solid Golden Age storytelling, chock full of morality, history and/or science lessons. The JSA take a tour through the history of Germany, for one last hurrah of wartime propaganda. They al Boy, what happened? As the stories in this volume were produced, World War II saw its final days and the quality of All-Star Comics plummeted. With the exception of the Hawkman sections, drawn by Joe Kubert, the art is pretty poor. The stories are a bit better--not some of Mr. Fox's better work, mind you--but solid Golden Age storytelling, chock full of morality, history and/or science lessons. The JSA take a tour through the history of Germany, for one last hurrah of wartime propaganda. They also revisit a 20-year old murder case, fight element eating robots from space, thwart a crime wave with the help of various disabled persons and combat portraits painted with paint that comes to life after sunset. If I didn't have a collector's mentality, I think I would've passed this one by. (Of course, I do kind of like the robots...)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rich Meyer

    This was the first volume of the All Star Comics Archives to reflect the period when there were no National Periodical Publications heroes on the team. NPP/DC and All American Comics split for awhile there, so no Superman, Batman, Dr. Fate, Spectre, etc. While the art isn't nearly as varied throughout all the issues as was usual for the title, there's some fun and informative stories in this book. I'd rate the one in which the JSA tries to help a disabled veteran show other folks with disabiliti This was the first volume of the All Star Comics Archives to reflect the period when there were no National Periodical Publications heroes on the team. NPP/DC and All American Comics split for awhile there, so no Superman, Batman, Dr. Fate, Spectre, etc. While the art isn't nearly as varied throughout all the issues as was usual for the title, there's some fun and informative stories in this book. I'd rate the one in which the JSA tries to help a disabled veteran show other folks with disabilities that they can be productive members of society the highest, along with the first tale, a historical journey in which a guy in the US who supports Germany is taken back in history to see how Germany's leadership became so messed up and power hungry. Mr. Terrific makes his sole Golden Age appearance with the team, and Wildcat appears in two stories. A good read for any GA fan!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Richard Remigio

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steven Heywood

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robert Stubbs

  9. 5 out of 5

    David

  10. 5 out of 5

    Damon Williams

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Pohl

  12. 5 out of 5

    Danny

  13. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rex

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brady

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karl Hickey

  19. 5 out of 5

    Xaanua

  20. 5 out of 5

    David

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tanu

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wt

  24. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jack Holt

  26. 5 out of 5

    Siddhant Nath

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Webster

  28. 5 out of 5

    Reyna

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sam Nerby

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael

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