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Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson: Recipes for Innovation from IBM & the Institute of Culinary Education

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You don't have to be a culinary genius to be a great cook. But when it comes to thinking outside the box, even the best chefs can be limited by their personal experiences, the tastes and flavor combinations they already know. That's why IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education teamed up to develop a groundbreaking cognitive cooking technology that helps cooks everywhere You don't have to be a culinary genius to be a great cook. But when it comes to thinking outside the box, even the best chefs can be limited by their personal experiences, the tastes and flavor combinations they already know. That's why IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education teamed up to develop a groundbreaking cognitive cooking technology that helps cooks everywhere discover and create delicious recipes, utilizing unusual ingredient combinations that man alone might never imagine. In Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson, IBM's unprecedented technology and ICE's culinary experts present more than 65 original recipes exploding with irresistible new flavors. Together, they have carefully crafted, evaluated and perfected each of these dishes for "pleasantness" (superb taste), "surprise" (innovativeness) and a "synergy" of mouthwatering ingredients that will delight any food lover. Sprinkled throughout the book are cooking tips from the pros at ICE, entertaining anecdotes on the various stages of IBM and ICE's collaboration and ideas for home cooks to expand their repertoires or spice up current favorites. From Chef Watson's first recipe ever, the Spanish Almond Crescent, to Creole Shrimp-Lamb Dumplings, Italian-Pumpkin Cheesecake, and Hoof-and-Honey Ale, Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson introduces home cooks and professional chefs to a whole new world of culinary possibilities.


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You don't have to be a culinary genius to be a great cook. But when it comes to thinking outside the box, even the best chefs can be limited by their personal experiences, the tastes and flavor combinations they already know. That's why IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education teamed up to develop a groundbreaking cognitive cooking technology that helps cooks everywhere You don't have to be a culinary genius to be a great cook. But when it comes to thinking outside the box, even the best chefs can be limited by their personal experiences, the tastes and flavor combinations they already know. That's why IBM and the Institute of Culinary Education teamed up to develop a groundbreaking cognitive cooking technology that helps cooks everywhere discover and create delicious recipes, utilizing unusual ingredient combinations that man alone might never imagine. In Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson, IBM's unprecedented technology and ICE's culinary experts present more than 65 original recipes exploding with irresistible new flavors. Together, they have carefully crafted, evaluated and perfected each of these dishes for "pleasantness" (superb taste), "surprise" (innovativeness) and a "synergy" of mouthwatering ingredients that will delight any food lover. Sprinkled throughout the book are cooking tips from the pros at ICE, entertaining anecdotes on the various stages of IBM and ICE's collaboration and ideas for home cooks to expand their repertoires or spice up current favorites. From Chef Watson's first recipe ever, the Spanish Almond Crescent, to Creole Shrimp-Lamb Dumplings, Italian-Pumpkin Cheesecake, and Hoof-and-Honey Ale, Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson introduces home cooks and professional chefs to a whole new world of culinary possibilities.

30 review for Cognitive Cooking with Chef Watson: Recipes for Innovation from IBM & the Institute of Culinary Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Taylor

    This book is mostly food porn for people who love Michelin-starred restaurants. I am a trained chef, and would love to try some of the recipes, but I cook three meals per day for a family of three, and can't imagine finding the time within the next decade. So, I'm rating it based on visual appeal, which it has a lot of. It also gives you a nice explanation for "how did they do that?" if you've ever had an experimental gastronomy dish. This book is mostly food porn for people who love Michelin-starred restaurants. I am a trained chef, and would love to try some of the recipes, but I cook three meals per day for a family of three, and can't imagine finding the time within the next decade. So, I'm rating it based on visual appeal, which it has a lot of. It also gives you a nice explanation for "how did they do that?" if you've ever had an experimental gastronomy dish.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    IBM and Watson - or rather, IBM, some servers, and the gifted programmers who comprise the Watson team - made waves recently with the publication of several creative recipes devised by Watson after the supercomputer was fed various cooking databases. The recipes that result are fairly complex, highly interesting, and somewhat confusingly presented in this cookbook. The recipes occupy a somewhat uncomfortable position between "weekend afternoon endeavor" and "haute cuisine tasting menu." As such, IBM and Watson - or rather, IBM, some servers, and the gifted programmers who comprise the Watson team - made waves recently with the publication of several creative recipes devised by Watson after the supercomputer was fed various cooking databases. The recipes that result are fairly complex, highly interesting, and somewhat confusingly presented in this cookbook. The recipes occupy a somewhat uncomfortable position between "weekend afternoon endeavor" and "haute cuisine tasting menu." As such, there are few that I even want to attempt - for example, James' Thai-Jewish chicken requires the preparation of 8 separate dishes, which are later combined into one, and the dish is supposed to take "90 minutes, plus marinating." Right - perhaps if you are a trained professional chef, with your mise en place, with nothing else to do, in a professional kitchen. Things like agar, parisienne scoops, and xantham gum are mentioned in passing. Perhaps I am merely biased against modern cuisine, as it doesn't provide enough calories for me to make it to lunch, let alone through dinner. Throughout the book, there was only one recipe which caught my eye - the American Kung Pao Chicken, which requires an overnight brine of pork belly and a five-hour braise. Despite that, the recipe optimistically claims that everything can get done in 90 minutes - "plus brining, cooking, and cooling." I generally find it helpful if cooking time is included in estimates of cooking time. I am also deducting (at least) one star for the authors' maddening inclusion of three pie charts - denoting "Surprise, Pleasantness, and Synergy" with each dish. Watson obviously calculates this numerically - just give us the number, or an Appendix summarizing all the recipes based on those criterias. ("Surprise" is also 100%, a full pie chart!, for nearly every dish, including braised lamb shanks, which are called "Moroccan almond curry" for some unknown reason.) The food in this cookbook in undoubtedly interesting and tasty and surprising and will reward the diligent home cook. I just think the book's many flaws, or its one-too-many ambitions, outweigh those positives.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barron

    New recipes created by an AI. The back cover of this book triumphantly declares that we will no longer have to rely on inspiration, genius, or the creative spark for our food ideas. To paraphrase the Lion King forsaking his birthright in order to eat bugs: Soulless, yet satisfying?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dray

    Sad to say this book didnt impress me. I love watson and his performance as go master, chess master and jeopardy contestant but these recipes were unappealing, overly complicated and way to meat oriented.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrea James

    It's with a heavy heart that I'm giving this book a couple of stars. My boyfriend got it for me because I'm a fan the Watson project (and most other clever uses of data and technology). As one of the other reviewers pointed out, the recipes in the book are not designed for the home cook, they involve so many different components to be prepared separately and sometimes ingredients that are not easy to source. I tried the Roasted Tomato and Mozzarella Tart because a) the recipe didn't look remotely It's with a heavy heart that I'm giving this book a couple of stars. My boyfriend got it for me because I'm a fan the Watson project (and most other clever uses of data and technology). As one of the other reviewers pointed out, the recipes in the book are not designed for the home cook, they involve so many different components to be prepared separately and sometimes ingredients that are not easy to source. I tried the Roasted Tomato and Mozzarella Tart because a) the recipe didn't look remotely surprising to me and chef Watson said that the surprise factor was 100% b) it didn't (at first glance) look like it would take as long or be as arduous as some the other recipes c) I fancied having some puff pastry and melted mozzarella (and this offered me an excuse to do so) The description said "what a stunner!" and yet the plesasantness was only around 55% (what do these pie charts mean?). I usually follow recipes closely the first time I make them. This time I ignored one of the instructions which was to get the edges golden brown before adding the filling because the tart in the book's picture looked overdone for my liking. It was fortunate that I chose to do that as the filling remained quite soft as the edges crisped up. And perhaps Mozzarella in the US is different to the ones we get in Europe because mine (as I expected) melted into the tart rather than looking fixed (and more plastic) as it did in the book. I was really hoping that I would be wrong and there would be something surprising about the taste (I'd never added cayenne before) but no, it is as you would expect a tomato and mozzarella tart to taste. There are some cocktails at the end of the book "Corn in the Coop" for instance with a very low surprise factor. The drink comes garnished with a piece of grilled chicken in the glass. I'd be pretty shocked to find chicken in my cocktail but maybe I've been going to all the wrong cocktail bars. The organisation of the information/recipes in the book is also unclear. All in all, I'm still excited about what Watson will be able to do in the future and reading the book has given me some ideas that hadn't occurred to me (so that was enjoyable) but as a book to cook from it is somewhat disappointing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alysa H.

    I was lucky enough to get an early copy of this, and it is so cool. The Chef Watson project is very innovative and the recipes look superdelicious!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Terri Griffith

    Combine it with their website for great food ideas and recipes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jim Morgan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clare

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  11. 4 out of 5

    Silvia Ching

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brian Sit

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Ford

  14. 5 out of 5

    Philip Craig

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Allain

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gian

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anson Biggs

  18. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Roquemore Ennis

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tesona Driskill

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  21. 5 out of 5

    William Carbone

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pinky

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steven Teitzel

  24. 5 out of 5

    Henry Jewkes

  25. 5 out of 5

    SE

  26. 4 out of 5

    MR BARRY MUNRO

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lorch

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kirk

  29. 5 out of 5

    Docsam

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lance

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