Hot Best Seller

The Leaning Tower and Other Stories: A Library of America eBook Classic

Availability: Ready to download

Here, in an authoritative text drawn from The Library of America's definitive edition Katherine Anne Porter: Collected Stories & Other Writings (also available as an e-book), is an exclusive digital edition of Porter's 1944 collection The Leaning Tower and Other Stories. Ranging from the Deep South to New York City to Berlin, incomparable in their dramatic clarity and emot Here, in an authoritative text drawn from The Library of America's definitive edition Katherine Anne Porter: Collected Stories & Other Writings (also available as an e-book), is an exclusive digital edition of Porter's 1944 collection The Leaning Tower and Other Stories. Ranging from the Deep South to New York City to Berlin, incomparable in their dramatic clarity and emotional force, the nine gems in this collection affirm Porter's genius for writing stories, as Eudora Welty observed, "with a power that stamps them to their very last detail on the memory." This Library of America E-Book Classic includes detailed annotation, a note on textual history, and a chronology of Porter's life.


Compare

Here, in an authoritative text drawn from The Library of America's definitive edition Katherine Anne Porter: Collected Stories & Other Writings (also available as an e-book), is an exclusive digital edition of Porter's 1944 collection The Leaning Tower and Other Stories. Ranging from the Deep South to New York City to Berlin, incomparable in their dramatic clarity and emot Here, in an authoritative text drawn from The Library of America's definitive edition Katherine Anne Porter: Collected Stories & Other Writings (also available as an e-book), is an exclusive digital edition of Porter's 1944 collection The Leaning Tower and Other Stories. Ranging from the Deep South to New York City to Berlin, incomparable in their dramatic clarity and emotional force, the nine gems in this collection affirm Porter's genius for writing stories, as Eudora Welty observed, "with a power that stamps them to their very last detail on the memory." This Library of America E-Book Classic includes detailed annotation, a note on textual history, and a chronology of Porter's life.

30 review for The Leaning Tower and Other Stories: A Library of America eBook Classic

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Leaning Tower And Other Stories, c1963, Katherine Anne Porter تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سی ام ماه سپتامبر سال 2009 میلادی عنوان: برج کج؛ نویسنده: کاترین‌ آن پورتر؛ مترجم: مجتبی ویسی؛ تهران، ثالث، 1387، در 111 ص، شابک: 9789643804459؛ چاپ دیگر 1391؛ در 136 ص؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان امریکایی قرن 20 م ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    As I was finishing Katherine Anne Porter’s remarkable story, “Holiday,” I wondered about the deforming illness that one of the characters, “Ottilie,” was suffering from. By accident I bumped into a 1995 New York Times essay on Porter, my novelist Mary Gordon (see link below). I still haven’t found out what happened to Ottilie, but the provocatively titled essay by Gordon, “The Angel of Malignity: The Cold Beauty of Katherine Anne Porter,” captured many of my quickly coalescing thoughts on Porter As I was finishing Katherine Anne Porter’s remarkable story, “Holiday,” I wondered about the deforming illness that one of the characters, “Ottilie,” was suffering from. By accident I bumped into a 1995 New York Times essay on Porter, my novelist Mary Gordon (see link below). I still haven’t found out what happened to Ottilie, but the provocatively titled essay by Gordon, “The Angel of Malignity: The Cold Beauty of Katherine Anne Porter,” captured many of my quickly coalescing thoughts on Porter. Gordon’s view of Porter is a bit sunnier than mine (but not by much), but we both agree on the “coldness,” and “malignity.” Of all our major American writers, Porter (who is also probably the least read), is perhaps our most morbid. I’m not talking about the gothic shadows of Poe, or the haunted woods of Hawthorne, but something deeper, like a long running bass note that underscores everything. The bass note is the Fear of Death. Not death itself, which is a concrete event that comes and goes in the cycle of life, but something more manic, that often seems to be on the verge of breaking out into a kind of hysteria. Porter knew Hemingway’s “Clean, Well Lighted Place” well. Papa could show Porter nothing she didn’t already know about death. In The Leaning Tower’s first story (a novella), “The Old Order,” Porter’s recurring alter-ego, “Miranda,” nearly loses it at the circus while watching (appropriately) a high wire act: The flaring lights burned through her lids, a roar of laughter like rage drowned out the steady raging of the drums and horns. She opened her eyes. . . A creature in a blousy white overall with ruffles at the neck and ankles, with bone white skull and chalk white face, with tufted eyebrows far apart in the middle of its forehead, the lids in a black sharp angle, a long scarlet mouth back into sunken cheeks, turned up in a perpetual bitter grimace of pain, astonishment, not smiling, pranced along a wire stretched down the center of the ring, balancing a long thin pole with little wheels at the end. Miranda thought at first he was walking on air, or flying, and this did not surprise her; but when she saw the wire, she was terrified. High above their heads the inhuman figure pranced, spinning the little wheels. He paused, slipped, the flapping white leg waved in space; he staggered, wobbled, slipped sideways, plunged, and caught the wire with frantic knee, hanging there upside down, the other leg waving like a feeler above his leg; slipped once more, caught by one frenzied heel, and swung back and forth like a scarf. . . The crowd roared with savage delight, shrieks of dreadful laughter like devils in delicious torment. . .Miranda shrieked too, with real pain, clutching at her stomach with her knees drawn up . . .The man on the wire, hanging by his foot, turned his head like a seal from side to side and blew sneering kisses from his cruel mouth. . . The above is probably my favorite passage from my favorite story in the book. The precision of the writing is a thing to behold, and boy, is it freighted with dread. In one instance magic is transformed into a nightmare, with the fragile wire of life now seen, the demonic figure dancing above, and then hanging upside down – like a figure from a Tarot deck -- all to the sound of laughter. Welcome to Hell to little girl. There is of course more to the “story,” though structurally it reminds me more of Tolstoy or Chekhov’s seemingly artless rambles. But like those two great writers, Porter weaves a complex, interrelated number of symbols throughout the course of the narrative. The bizarre conclusion, that has Miranda and her brother, after an afternoon of hunting and crawling in and out of emptied graves, poking at a flayed rabbit that was ready to give birth, underscores in bold Porter’s morbidity. It’s a scene that might have shocked Poe. The following stories (there are only five in the collection) are for the most part excellent, excepting perhaps “A Day’s Work,” which I felt slight in comparison to the rest. It’s about an arguing Irish couple in the city. He’s a drunk, she’s a scold. The story hinted at something darker, and then closed with the comic. I was disappointed, but even with Porter’s weak stories, there are those sentences, descriptions, that have you going back and re-reading pages again and again. One outstanding story, and one of Porter’s very best, is “Holiday.” Evidently it took Porter – always the perfectionist -- thirty years to finish. (Gordon, in her essay, notes that Porter was not prolific, and if one were to break down her literary output per year of her life, it averaged about ten pages a year.) It’s about an unnamed woman who, needing a sabbatical, goes to live with a German family out in the sticks of Texas back country. What follows are the woman’s observations of life with the family. Increasingly these observations center on a crippled servant girl who, as it turns out, is also a member of the family. The collection’s final story, “The Leaning Tower,” I was only OK with, maybe because I was still in the “Wow” zone after reading “Holiday.” It’s good, even necessary, if you’re in to pre-World War 2 literature, and works as an excellent complement to Isherwood’s Berlin Stories. Part of my problem is that I got the sense that Porter was using this story as a model for her later novel, Ship of Fools. The “Leaning Tower,” in its own way, with its varied cast of characters, is a ship of fools in miniature. Gordon essay link: http://www.nytimes.com/1995/04/16/boo...

  3. 5 out of 5

    میلاد کامیابیان

    خشت اول چون نهد معمار... میلاد کامیابیان 1 «برج کج» را کاترین ان پورتر در سال 1944 منتشر کرده، یعنی پیش از پایان جنگ جهانی دوم. داستان این نوولا، اما، در سال 1931 می‌گذرد، در برلینِ مفلوک پس از جنگ اول جهانی. چارلز آپتون، نقاش نوخاسته‌ی آمریکایی، آمده تا اروپا را ببیند و استعدادش را پرورش بدهد، هرچند به نظر نمی‌رسد شهر درستی را برای اقامت انتخاب کرده باشد. رفتار اهالیِ شهر با غریبه‌ها خصمانه است، به‌خصوص اگر اهل آمریکا باشند، کشوری که به زعم آنان باعث شکست آلمان در جنگ قبلی شده. در همچو شرایطی، چار خشت اول چون نهد معمار... میلاد کامیابیان 1 «برج کج» را کاترین ان پورتر در سال 1944 منتشر کرده، یعنی پیش از پایان جنگ جهانی دوم. داستان این نوولا، اما، در سال 1931 می‌گذرد، در برلینِ مفلوک پس از جنگ اول جهانی. چارلز آپتون، نقاش نوخاسته‌ی آمریکایی، آمده تا اروپا را ببیند و استعدادش را پرورش بدهد، هرچند به نظر نمی‌رسد شهر درستی را برای اقامت انتخاب کرده باشد. رفتار اهالیِ شهر با غریبه‌ها خصمانه است، به‌خصوص اگر اهل آمریکا باشند، کشوری که به زعم آنان باعث شکست آلمان در جنگ قبلی شده. در همچو شرایطی، چارلز سرانجام در خانه‌ی زنی میان‌سال و اصالتاً اتریشی اتاقی برای سکونت می‌یابد. مراسم ورود چندان خوشایند پیش نمی‌رود: نقاش جوان، سهواً، مجسمه‌ی کوچکی را که به شکل برج کج پیزا ساخته شده و برای خانم صاحب‌خانه یادگاری است از روزگار خوش گذشته –سال‌های پیش از جنگ– می‌شکند و، بعد، چنان دست‌وپایش را گم می‌کند که تصمیم می‌گیرد از خیر اجاره‌ی اتاق بگذرد، اما قرارداد در راه است و او چاره‌ای جز امضا ندارد. این‌جا، درست در دل این وضعیت نادل‌پذیر، در اتاقی که یک طرفش زنی با چشمان اشک‌آلود ایستاده و طرف دیگرش مردی جوان با احساس شرمندگی، برج کجی که نام اثر را رقم زده برای نخستین‌بار جلوه می‌کند. در ترازی نمادین، انهدام این آخرین بازمانده‌ی ایامِ خوبِ رفته نشانه‌ی آینده‌ی نامطمئن زن ژرمن و خیرخواهیِ بی‌فایده و ضررآفرین مرد یانکی به نظر می‌رسد. اما در متن اثر برای مجال دادن به همچو قرائتی باید نشانه‌های دیگری هم تعبیه شده باشند. 2 در خانه سه مرد جوان دیگر هم اقامت دارند: تادیوژ مِی، اوتو بوسنِ و هانس وان گهرینگ. اولی نوازنده‌ای لهستانی است، دومی دانشجویی اهل شمال آلمان و سومی آلمانیِ مغروری که زخم تازه‌ی دوئلی نافرجام را بر صورت دارد و آرزویش رفتن به پاریس زیباست. ملیت‌ها و اخلاقیات ساکنان خانه به‌دقت انتخاب شده‌اند. با پیش رفتن اثر، از خلال صحبت‌ها و روابط اشخاص، درمی‌یابیم که تادیوژِ نوازنده جهان‌دیده‌ترین و خردمندترینِ این جمع است –همو که مقدر است، چند سال بعد، با فرمان پیشوا، خاک کشورش ضمیمه‌ی خاک آلمان نازی شود. اوتو بوسنِ به‌اصطلاح شهرستانی دانشجوی ساده‌دلی است که کنج عافیت را می‌گزیند و، به‌عکس، هانسِ جذاب –از زخمی که بر گونه دارد هم پیداست که– سری پرشور دارد و، درست، از سنخ جوانان مغروری به نظر می‌آید که، اندکی بعد، فرصت عضویت در شاخه‌ی جوانان حزب نازی و کسب قدرت را به هیچ روی از دست نمی‌دهند. تکلیف چارلز هم که پیش‌تر روشن شد: نمونه‌ی تازه‌سال آمریکاییِ خوب که همه‌جا با نیت خیر وارد عمل می‌شود، گیرم نتیجه‌ی کارش به هیچ وجه آن چیزی که پیش‌بینی می‌کرده نباشد. اطلاعات برون‌متنیِ خواننده، خواه‌ناخواه، در سبک‌سنگین کردن این مردان جوان دخیل است و شک نیست که این چهار نفر، مثل تمام شخصیت‌های رمان‌ها و نوولاهای برجسته‌ی جهان، نه فقط از زبان خود، که از دل گفتمانی که ایشان را پرورده و بارآورده سخن می‌گویند. به این طریق است که خانه‌ی کوچک رزا فایشل به مکانی برای تعاطیِ گفتمان‌ها تبدیل می‌شود و این، بی‌شک، هنر نویسنده است، هرچند هنری نه‌چندان بدیع. 3 برج کج بار دیگر در پایان اثر ظاهر می‌شود، هنگامی که چارلز، خسته از پای‌کوبی و شادخواریِ شب سال نو، از باشگاه به اتاقش برگشته و برج را، تعمیرشده و بندزده، در گنجه می‌بیند. علی‌رغم تمام خوشی‌هایی که در باشگاه برای چارلز مهیا بوده، او دل‌زده و ناامید بر تختش دراز می‌کشد و این درست همان لحظه‌ی مکاشفه‌گونی است که معنای نمادین برج کج بر او آشکاره می‌شود: «آن‌جا بود، کوچک و شکننده و گستاخ، چنان‌که گویی به او دل‌و‌جرئت می‌داد نزدیک‌تر برود. خوب می‌دانست که انگشتان شست و سبابه چه قدرتی برای خرد کردن جسمی ظریف دارند تا در چشم‌برهم‌زدنی تکه‌های مرمت‌شده را از نو در هم بشکنند و بر زمین بریزند. این شیء کوچک و متهور، کج و معلق، همواره آماده‌ی سقوط، ولی همچنان پابرجا، چرا به این شکل بود؟ نه، اشتباهی از همان ابتدا رخ داده بود. این برج در قسمت فوقانی دچار مشکلی نامأنوس بود. برج‌ها که نباید از همان ابتدا کج باشند.» برج کج نشانه‌ی وضعیت آلمان پس از جنگ بود، و آلمان پیش از جنگ. برج کج نماینده‌ی جهان پس از جنگ بود، و پس از آن. برج کج نماد وضعیت عام بشری است: محاط در مرگی محتوم و در آرزوی رستگاری‌ای از دست شده –گیرم فاش‌گوییِ پایانیِ نویسنده کیفیت این «برج کج» را کاهش داده باشد.‏ ____________________________ این یادداشت در «اعتماد»:‏ http://www.etemadnewspaper.ir/Release... در «پوئتیکا»:‏ http://poesis.blogfa.com/post/83/%D8%...-

  4. 5 out of 5

    Baktash

    خیلی چرند بود. نمیدونم شاید بخاطر این بود که من نسخه ی کتاب شب که پخش رادیویی بود گوش دادم اینقدر بد بود.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    I have to admit that with short stories I somewhat counterintuitively have less patience than with novels. I don't want a slice of life showing me how it was for certain people who lived at a particular time in a particular place. Or, I don't want only that. I want plot, story, incident, consequence. Not alot of that here. I can't fault the writing at all, and there was only one story I disliked. So Porter can capture the milieu of poor whites and blacks in the south when there is still a memory I have to admit that with short stories I somewhat counterintuitively have less patience than with novels. I don't want a slice of life showing me how it was for certain people who lived at a particular time in a particular place. Or, I don't want only that. I want plot, story, incident, consequence. Not alot of that here. I can't fault the writing at all, and there was only one story I disliked. So Porter can capture the milieu of poor whites and blacks in the south when there is still a memory of slavery, or the indefinable tension in the air in 1931 Berlin among several young men, variously German, Polish, and American. But none of the stories wowed me, none will I reread. I just needed more stuff to actually happen. In college a professor could have probably swayed me that some of these are great, but I'm older now and swayed less easily.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Margarida

    Excelentes contos. Este livro reúne duas antologias: "Judas em flor e outras histórias" e "A Torre Inclinada e outros contos". A autora recebeu o National Book Award e o Pulitzer Prize pelas suas "Collected Stories". Excelentes contos. Este livro reúne duas antologias: "Judas em flor e outras histórias" e "A Torre Inclinada e outros contos". A autora recebeu o National Book Award e o Pulitzer Prize pelas suas "Collected Stories".

  7. 5 out of 5

    Arezoo h

    فلاكت...

  8. 5 out of 5

    meelad

    خوش خوان و سرراسته و لحظات مفرح خیلی زیاد توش پیدا می‌شه. ولی موضوع هویت ملی و مقایسه اروپا و آمریکا یکم کهنه و بی‌مزه است و گاهی تو ذوق می‌زنه ـ شاید به دلیل این که هفتاد سال از نوشته شدن کتاب می‌گذره و اوضاع دنیا عوض شده! ترجمه مجتبی ویسی هم مثل کتاب قبلی که ازش خوندم به نظرم خیلی خوبه، با کمی ویرایش بیشتر و کمی ممیزی کمتر عالی‌تر هم می‌شد.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

    احساس مي كرد سرخوشي اش به يك درد شباهت دارد،وزنه اي سنگين بر تنش، و حال اگرچه نمي تواند به روشني فكر كند، چيزي را احساس مي كند كه پيش تر هرگز ان را نشناخته است:تباهي جهنمي جان را، سرما و اگاهي از مرگ را در درون خويش

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I may not have read every single story, but I read the title one, and a few more––enough to know it's a solid 4. Very spare prose, not so gothic for being southern, but then again she moved to nyc relatively young... I may not have read every single story, but I read the title one, and a few more––enough to know it's a solid 4. Very spare prose, not so gothic for being southern, but then again she moved to nyc relatively young...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Illiterate

    These stories often foreground the continuity of daily chores, relationships, and sufferings as social change and private tragedy wash over people.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mercedé Khodadadi

    اسم برج کج کاترین آن پورتر را زیاد شنیده بودم، کنجکاو بودم ببینم چیست. اولین کتابی بود که از آن پورتر میخواندم. خوب بود، یعنی نمیتوانی بگویی کتابی بدی است یا ارزش خواندن ندارد. برج کج پیزا در داستان یک نماد است و بیانگر چیزی یا جایی است که آرزوی دیدنش و دستیابی به آن را داری اما وقتی آن را پیدا میکنی، نقص و عیوبش تازه بر تو آشکار میشود. چارلز آپتون نقاشی آمریکایی است که به دلیل سفارشهای دوست اکنون مرده دوران کودکی اش مبنی بر دیدن برلین یک بار هم که در زندگی اش شده؛ به آلمان می آید. اما برلینی که اسم برج کج کاترین آن پورتر را زیاد شنیده بودم، کنجکاو بودم ببینم چیست. اولین کتابی بود که از آن پورتر میخواندم. خوب بود، یعنی نمیتوانی بگویی کتابی بدی است یا ارزش خواندن ندارد. برج کج پیزا در داستان یک نماد است و بیانگر چیزی یا جایی است که آرزوی دیدنش و دستیابی به آن را داری اما وقتی آن را پیدا میکنی، نقص و عیوبش تازه بر تو آشکار میشود. چارلز آپتون نقاشی آمریکایی است که به دلیل سفارشهای دوست اکنون مرده دوران کودکی اش مبنی بر دیدن برلین یک بار هم که در زندگی اش شده؛ به آلمان می آید. اما برلینی که میابد با برلینی که دوستش کونو توصیف کرده فرق دارد: برلین پس از جنگ، اقتصاد در هم شکسته شده، آدمهایی فقیر و مغازه دارانی چنان درمانده که اگر جنسشان را بهشان پس بدهی اشک در چشمانشان حلقه میزند. کتاب کمی مرا یاد کتاب "آمریکا" نوشته فرانتس کافکا می انداخت

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Kosar

    I really enjoyed this collection of short stories. Porter's nine stories focus on very different people in very diverse settings, including former slaves in rural post-bellum south, an urban Irish husband and wife, and a young American artist in Wiemar Berlin. Poverty, strife, and suffering are recurring themes. Porter's book is especially interesting to me because so much of the world she describes is gone. Reading these short stories engaged my imagination and lifted me out of 2011. Although th I really enjoyed this collection of short stories. Porter's nine stories focus on very different people in very diverse settings, including former slaves in rural post-bellum south, an urban Irish husband and wife, and a young American artist in Wiemar Berlin. Poverty, strife, and suffering are recurring themes. Porter's book is especially interesting to me because so much of the world she describes is gone. Reading these short stories engaged my imagination and lifted me out of 2011. Although this is a short book, one can't read it quickly---or at least I couldn't. The sentences often are long and the descriptions are rich; Porter also drops the reader into a scene, and to understand what's going on requires the reader to take time to consider the words.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    What I said on fb is what I stand by. She reminds me of a weirdo mix between Eudora Welty and Flannery O'Connor and Joyce Carol Oates. But without the full-on gothicness of JCO. I think the best one of this collection is The Leaning Tower as it captures the tensions between the two wars in Germany. I liked the Grave in college, bur it's less wow now. Might read more of hers, but later. Her terseness kind of bothers me. Which is hardly surprsing. Probably wait on Amer. Lit books for a bit. Think What I said on fb is what I stand by. She reminds me of a weirdo mix between Eudora Welty and Flannery O'Connor and Joyce Carol Oates. But without the full-on gothicness of JCO. I think the best one of this collection is The Leaning Tower as it captures the tensions between the two wars in Germany. I liked the Grave in college, bur it's less wow now. Might read more of hers, but later. Her terseness kind of bothers me. Which is hardly surprsing. Probably wait on Amer. Lit books for a bit. Think I had to read her in grad. school, but I've forgotten which ones and that info may have been lost in a previous move.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Rahimi

    This is the second book of Porter's stories I have read. Her style is fine but I don't enjoy most of her plots. However I especially liked Old Order, the series of short vignettes set in the South straddling before and after Emancipation. I think she was able to capture a bit of the surprise white southerners felt when they realized that their black "Mammy" did not perhaps really love them as much as they thought they did. This is the second book of Porter's stories I have read. Her style is fine but I don't enjoy most of her plots. However I especially liked Old Order, the series of short vignettes set in the South straddling before and after Emancipation. I think she was able to capture a bit of the surprise white southerners felt when they realized that their black "Mammy" did not perhaps really love them as much as they thought they did.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    I enjoyed these short stories. The first few were about the same family over a number of years.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Realini

    The Leaning Tower by Katherine Anne Porter Another version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... and http://realini.blogspot.ro/ This is an exceptional, if different short story by the Pulitzer Prize Winner Katherine Anne Porter. It is longer than the usual narrative found in the Collection that I have just finished reading. And it takes place in Berlin, whereas the rest took the reader mainly to the area not far from the Mexican border The Leaning Tower by Katherine Anne Porter Another version of this note and thoughts on other books are available at: - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... and http://realini.blogspot.ro/ This is an exceptional, if different short story by the Pulitzer Prize Winner Katherine Anne Porter. It is longer than the usual narrative found in the Collection that I have just finished reading. And it takes place in Berlin, whereas the rest took the reader mainly to the area not far from the Mexican border, on either side of it. The hero is an American though, Charles Upton the son of a farming family from Texas. He wants to be a painter and one of the reasons why he is in Berlin is that his friend Kuno had told him such wonderful things about the city. Charles came to study art here, thinking that he will find a town of castles. It is not. Furthermore, it is 1931 and Germany has been through a terrible crisis. The landlady is showing Charles a suitcase with million marks bank notes and other denominations that are worthless because of the staggering inflation: You could not buy a loaf of bread with these Go out and see! The American meets with various people, most of whom have a distorted view of his country and those living in it... "The Americans are all rich, they come to Europe and throw money at dancing girls... They light their cigars with dollar bills" Charles Upton protests, but if falls on deaf ears. There are three other men that occupy rooms in the same house, paying a smaller sum because the American must be richer to the same landlady. Hans is a young man who has been through a duel and he has a really bad wound on the cheek, that will leave a serious scar. Charles thinks that people would be embarrassed and avoid looking at it back in Texas, where this kind of proof of a conflict would be demeaning. Whereas in Berlin, it was a matter of pride and high status. Everyone knew how it came about and approved. Hans was delighted by the evidence of his bravery and the tribute to his honor. Tadeusz is a Polish youth, with ancestry in Austria and much further East. His grandmother was a Tartar and he loves London, which he considers the best city to live in. There is an interesting theory that is discussed with the aforementioned and Otto, a mathematician with a bright future, but destitute for the moment. This construct maintains that the real people of one country are the peasants. The aristocracy married with nobles from many other countries, because they had the money to travel, mix and marry in other lands. Whereas the peasants never went anywhere. They had wives and then children locally. It sounds reasonable, even if after this account they go into assessing the populations of Germany, America and others. And the characters proposing their views are wrong: Americans do what I wrote earlier... There is no such thing as this population is like this or that In large numbers, all groups have good and bad individuals. Americans have voted in large numbers with The Donald, but three million more against him. And there is a big difference between the value system of one group and the other. At one point, when Charles enters his room for the first time, he sees The Leaning Tower. It is actually a small, cheap and apparently distasteful replica of The Leaning Tower of Pisa. Alas, Charles touches the small thing and it disintegrated. Much to the despair of the landlady who explains that it was a souvenir from her trip to Italy. Back then her husband was alive and life was much better and this little tower was the symbol of those happy days... And this gives the name and a different significance to the account. Eudora Welty said about Katherine Anne Porter: "She writes stories with a power that stamps them to the very last detail on the memory" Oh, yes indeed!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rod

    3.5 The parts I enjoyed (e.g. Holiday) I really enjoyed a lot, though it was an admittedly uneven collection. I don't know where she was going with the title story, and was a little frustrated while reading it, though I have to admit something about the ending is staying with me. She's a good writer and I look forward to moving onto "Pale Hore, Pale Rider," (part of my ongoing pursuit of "flu fiction"). 3.5 The parts I enjoyed (e.g. Holiday) I really enjoyed a lot, though it was an admittedly uneven collection. I don't know where she was going with the title story, and was a little frustrated while reading it, though I have to admit something about the ending is staying with me. She's a good writer and I look forward to moving onto "Pale Hore, Pale Rider," (part of my ongoing pursuit of "flu fiction").

  19. 5 out of 5

    Delphine Lucas

    This was a work of a genius. Nothing that is written today comes close to this nuanced subtle and fascinating writing. This is my first book I’ve read by her. I’m surprised I’ve waited this long. I look forward to reading everything else she’s written. At the end of the book is a short biography of her. What a life. She really did live and for that time period, she was truly remarkable.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Miguel Serradas

    Conjunto de pequenas histórias muito bem contadas, tradução muito boa. Utilização extensiva da palavra “comissura” :).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amir Rafighi

    یه کتاب کم حجم که نثر گیرایی داره

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Interesting snap-shots of a strange time. Her writing reminded me of Hemmingway-- except the female characters were written like people in stead of decorative objects.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kalle

    As usual with collections of short stories, this one is a bit of a hit-and-miss. The titular story is worth reading, and while the others had their moments, I did not really enjoy them that much.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Samane

    ما بايد اين نكته را درك كنيم كه دردها و رنج هاي يك مرد به خودش مربوط است و اغلب اين خود اوست كه بايد دست بالا بزند و به شيوه خود حل و فصل شان كند. ما از كجا بدانيم چه عملي خوب است يا بد؟

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bishop

  26. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gavin William Wright

  28. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Serna

  29. 4 out of 5

    Peighton

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jane

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...