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Logan's Run: Vintage Movie Classics

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The bestselling dystopian novel that inspired the 1970s science-fiction classic starring Michael York, Jenny Agutter, and Richard Jordan. In 2116, it is against the law to live beyond the age of twenty-one years. When the crystal flower in the palm of your hand turns from red to black, you have reached your Lastday and you must report to a Sleepshop for processing. But the The bestselling dystopian novel that inspired the 1970s science-fiction classic starring Michael York, Jenny Agutter, and Richard Jordan. In 2116, it is against the law to live beyond the age of twenty-one years. When the crystal flower in the palm of your hand turns from red to black, you have reached your Lastday and you must report to a Sleepshop for processing. But the human will to survive is strong—stronger than any mere law.   Logan 3 is a Sandman, an enforcer who hunts down those Runners who refuse to accept Deep Sleep. The day before Logan’s palmflower shifts to black, a Runner accidentally reveals that he was racing toward a goal: Sanctuary. With this information driving him forward, Logan 3 assumes the role of the hunted and becomes a Runner.


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The bestselling dystopian novel that inspired the 1970s science-fiction classic starring Michael York, Jenny Agutter, and Richard Jordan. In 2116, it is against the law to live beyond the age of twenty-one years. When the crystal flower in the palm of your hand turns from red to black, you have reached your Lastday and you must report to a Sleepshop for processing. But the The bestselling dystopian novel that inspired the 1970s science-fiction classic starring Michael York, Jenny Agutter, and Richard Jordan. In 2116, it is against the law to live beyond the age of twenty-one years. When the crystal flower in the palm of your hand turns from red to black, you have reached your Lastday and you must report to a Sleepshop for processing. But the human will to survive is strong—stronger than any mere law.   Logan 3 is a Sandman, an enforcer who hunts down those Runners who refuse to accept Deep Sleep. The day before Logan’s palmflower shifts to black, a Runner accidentally reveals that he was racing toward a goal: Sanctuary. With this information driving him forward, Logan 3 assumes the role of the hunted and becomes a Runner.

30 review for Logan's Run: Vintage Movie Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    In the year 2011, it is impossible to discuss the Logan's Run novel without mentioning the 1976 movie, which I believe has surpassed the original work in terms of notoriety. Upon comparison, the reason for this is all too clear. While my modern tastes found the 70's movie to be rather charming, I cannot say the same for the novel. The first problem comes with the age limit. With no character over 21, descriptions of people as "man" and "woman" are confusing and try the limits of my suspension of In the year 2011, it is impossible to discuss the Logan's Run novel without mentioning the 1976 movie, which I believe has surpassed the original work in terms of notoriety. Upon comparison, the reason for this is all too clear. While my modern tastes found the 70's movie to be rather charming, I cannot say the same for the novel. The first problem comes with the age limit. With no character over 21, descriptions of people as "man" and "woman" are confusing and try the limits of my suspension of disbelief. At no point was I convinced of the youth of the characters. The author very clearly just wrote whatever personality he pleased with no consideration to the limits imposed by his setting. (as a side note, the movie sets the age limit at the much more believable 30) Moreover, the novel fails to familiarize the reader with the structure and composition of the world before plowing around in it. New locales are clumsily introduced immediately before the scenes in which the appear and abandoned right as the reader begins to get acclimated. I came to this book hoping for a deeper world than that of the movie, and I was completely let down. The premise is intriguing, but honestly if you'd like to look into Logan's world, watch the movie and save yourself a couple hours. Recommended for: *People who hate movies *People with bad taste

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anissa

    Over the last several years I've watched a number of 70s science fiction movies: ( Logan's Run, Soylent Green, Westworld, etc.) and read the books when I could. I finally got a copy of Logan's Run and gave it a read. I liked this but I have to admit that I think the movie is more engaging. Perhaps that's simply because it was my introduction to the story. I'll just mention here what I most liked and didn't in the book. The characters beyond Logan and Jessica (and maybe Francis to an extent) were Over the last several years I've watched a number of 70s science fiction movies: ( Logan's Run, Soylent Green, Westworld, etc.) and read the books when I could. I finally got a copy of Logan's Run and gave it a read. I liked this but I have to admit that I think the movie is more engaging. Perhaps that's simply because it was my introduction to the story. I'll just mention here what I most liked and didn't in the book. The characters beyond Logan and Jessica (and maybe Francis to an extent) were mere sketches and not memorable at all. I didn't much mind that because the settings were pretty detailed and interesting. Logan and Jessica see many places in this world that were not at all in the movie so that kept things fairly exciting. The story does linger overlong in a few places and it became surprisingly tedious. It's a short volume and feeling like something could have been edited down is somewhat a disappointment. My favourite part of the book was in the last third where many things come together but most importantly for me, the reader finds out how and why the United States turned into this place. It was fascinating, sad and somewhat disturbingly imaginable given the current real world. There's a climate crisis, over-population, government over-reach, civil uprising and what I can only describe as a complete breakdown of a society that ultimately trades one handful of horrors for a basket of other horrors. The use of propaganda was also a scary feature here and there's a whole section surrounding a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia that just boggled the mind. The book was worth reading for these parts alone. The ending was great, and I think I may have liked it more than the movie's ending. There's a great twist and the back third of this book had me up late reading. In the end, both the book and the movie had things to recommend them and I am glad that I read this. I have noticed that there are subsequent books in Logan, so perhaps I'll find and read those at some point also. Recommended. A couple of favourite passages: "Logan paused to survey the vast mural which gave the structure its name—a climbing mosaic composed of tiny bits of fireglass brilliantly arranged to commemorate the Burning of Washington. Orange, purple and raw red flames jeweled halfway up the façade; bodies flamed; buildings smoked and tumbled. Yet the awesome masterwork was flawed, incomplete. Stark, gaping areas broke the pattern. Only the famed muralist Roebler 7 could handle the corrosive fireglass, and when he had accepted Sleep his secret died with him. The project would never be finished." "In his State of the Union address President Curtain had stressed the severity of the food shortage, as world population spiraled toward six billion. He called upon the young to exercise self-control in this crisis. But the sight of the fat, overfed President standing in living units across the country, talking of duty and restraint, had a negative effect on his audience. And the well-known fact that Curtain had fathered nine children made a showdown inevitable." "The Little War had begun. By morning, half of Washington was in flames. Senators and congressmen were dragged in terror from their homes and hanged like criminals from trees and lampposts. The police and National Guard units were swept away in the first major wave of rioting. Buildings were set afire and explosives used. During the confusion an attendant at the Washington Zoo released the animals to save them from flames. The beasts were never recaptured."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Real Rating: 2.5* of five I remembered this book fondly. The summer the film came out, I drove my licenseless buds to the Village Multiplex in Pygge, my 1968 Bonneville. (We'd passed the book around our Scooby-group, drinking it in.) There Michael York cheekboned his way into my, um, heart shall we say, and the rest of the film...and the entirety of the book...faded into insignificance. Netflix loses the film on January 1st. I figured I'd rewatch it, while I give the book another go; after all, th Real Rating: 2.5* of five I remembered this book fondly. The summer the film came out, I drove my licenseless buds to the Village Multiplex in Pygge, my 1968 Bonneville. (We'd passed the book around our Scooby-group, drinking it in.) There Michael York cheekboned his way into my, um, heart shall we say, and the rest of the film...and the entirety of the book...faded into insignificance. Netflix loses the film on January 1st. I figured I'd rewatch it, while I give the book another go; after all, they're part of my formative years, so as I enter the last laps let's look back to the track, eh what? You would think that, by now, I'd know better. The book is just plain bad. The prose rises to the dizzying heights of serviceability a couple times, all the way up the slope of passable; the bulk of the 150pp are spent on the Plains of Puerility. A pair of fortyish numpties wrote about a world in which they'd be dead twenty years. It went about as well as that makes it sound. It's sexist, of course; it was ground-breaking for its day because the hedonism of its society isn't particularly concerned about who you do since there are no children born of sexual congress. Makes the property base of marriage pretty useless, so marriage simply isn't. But the big draw, the martial arts bits, are tame and tedious 50 years on. (It came out in 1967, the film in 1976.) The action scenes are mildly fun. The story's versions of Logan and Francis are in a whole father/son dynamic that never gets much of anywhere because, well, you did see the page count, right? The ending takes place in Space. I won't say why, but it is the trippiest piece of dumbfuckery I can imagine. These guys were tripping when they wrote the ending, there's no other excuse. End it does, however, so I shook my head and started streaming the film. Rob was here that day. He hadn't heard of the book or the film. He flipped through the book a bit and quietly reshelved it after about ten minutes. "Ready to see the film?" I asked; "not really" was the honest reply. Luckily Michael York is there from the get-go, cheekbones a-jut and body firmly and revealingly encased in a spiffy dark costume. I heard no further nose-sighs from little spoon...until a scene where Logan/Michael dials up a sex worker and gets, on his first try, a man. "...?!!?..." "Hey, even *I* had older mentors," I said. "Wait for the robot butcher scene. That's when we get to see Logan and Jessica naked!" And that is pretty much it. The naked scene isn't him naked, it's just her, and some artfully obscured extras who earned that paycheck; a bit disappointing, but obscured by the fact that the film takes a turn for the idiotic from there on out. We ended up wondering what the hell was the point of this exercise, how far breaking ground can go in keeping a creative endeavor in active circulation. I think it's time to let this one slide into the background and we should pack it away in shredded copies of the awful book it was inspired by but doesn't much resemble.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    Definitely a good bad book, which anticipated cyberpunk the way Robert Sheckley anticipated Douglas Adams. In Logan's world, everyone has to submit to voluntary euthanasia when they turn 21 and their palmflower goes black. But Logan decides he'll try and find Ballard, who's 42 and has lived a double lifetime. Maybe he can help him escape to the mythical Sanctuary. It doesn't exactly make sense, but there are lots of very memorable sequences... ______________________________________ Just saw that Ni Definitely a good bad book, which anticipated cyberpunk the way Robert Sheckley anticipated Douglas Adams. In Logan's world, everyone has to submit to voluntary euthanasia when they turn 21 and their palmflower goes black. But Logan decides he'll try and find Ballard, who's 42 and has lived a double lifetime. Maybe he can help him escape to the mythical Sanctuary. It doesn't exactly make sense, but there are lots of very memorable sequences... ______________________________________ Just saw that Nicolas Winding Refn and Ryan Gosling are going to be teaming up again to do a new movie version. If it's as good as Drive, it should really be worth watching. Though I'm disappointed to see that they've already announced one major change: people in Logan's world will be euthanased at 30, not 21 as in the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Olethros

    -Una idea interesante para su época, no tanto ahora, y una ejecución irregular, tanto entonces como ahora.- Género. Ciencia ficción. Lo que nos cuenta. El libro La fuga de Logan (publicación original: Logan’s Run, 1967) nos presenta al Vigilante Logan, un agente de Sueño Profundo dedicado a la caza de Fugitivos, personas que no siguen la ley y, al cumplir los veintiún años, tratan de evitar su final en las Casas del Sueño. Hay más Fugitivos cada vez y parecen estar organizados, buscando un lugar l -Una idea interesante para su época, no tanto ahora, y una ejecución irregular, tanto entonces como ahora.- Género. Ciencia ficción. Lo que nos cuenta. El libro La fuga de Logan (publicación original: Logan’s Run, 1967) nos presenta al Vigilante Logan, un agente de Sueño Profundo dedicado a la caza de Fugitivos, personas que no siguen la ley y, al cumplir los veintiún años, tratan de evitar su final en las Casas del Sueño. Hay más Fugitivos cada vez y parecen estar organizados, buscando un lugar llamado Santuario donde podrán evitar su destino dictado por el sistema sociopolítico en el que viven. Cuando llega su último día, Logan tiene dudas y un contacto casi fortuito con Jessica, la hermana de una de sus víctimas, hace que él mismo se convierta en un Fugitivo. ¿Quiere saber más de este libro, sin spoilers? Visite: https://librosdeolethros.blogspot.com...

  6. 5 out of 5

    St-Michel

    So I picked this up for 87 cents basically for two reasons: 1. It's Logan's Run!!! What more need be said? 2. Come on, 87 cents? Did I mention that it's Logan's Run? Ok, I hate reading the book after I've seen the movie (this pretty much goes with any book-to-eventual-movie combo), but really, I vaguely even recall the movie - I remember scant parts and I think most of the parts I remember aren't even in the book and I think the other parts I remember are those refreshed by stills wedged into the m So I picked this up for 87 cents basically for two reasons: 1. It's Logan's Run!!! What more need be said? 2. Come on, 87 cents? Did I mention that it's Logan's Run? Ok, I hate reading the book after I've seen the movie (this pretty much goes with any book-to-eventual-movie combo), but really, I vaguely even recall the movie - I remember scant parts and I think most of the parts I remember aren't even in the book and I think the other parts I remember are those refreshed by stills wedged into the middle of the book after being reprinted in '76 to promote the movie. (Sigh, I hate movie promoting versions of books too, but oh well, it's not like I had a choice.) Now, despite what I can remember from the movie, I loved it and more than anything, I sort of picked this up for a good laugh. Actually, I was pleasantly surprised. This was actually pretty damn good. It was short, fast-paced and amazingly gripping. Seriously, I couldn't put it down and rolled through in a few short hours...and now...well now I gotta go track down the movie again. There's few book/movie combinations I enjoy - it's usually one or the other, either the book was fantastic and the movie was nothing more than shallow hollywood droll or...well, the other doesn't happen very often. This is one of the few exceptions where both were superb.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Checkman

    Sometimes classic science-fiction isn't as good as one hopes. While a better written novel than the sequel it isn't as fun. As pointed out by Stacey it's really nothing more than a glorified chase through a exotic series of sets. The future world of "Logan's Run" isn't as developed as it should be while predictions of future events are wildly off the mark; weighing the story down and hurting it as a result. A product of it's time (late Sixties) it's also apparent that the authors (who were in th Sometimes classic science-fiction isn't as good as one hopes. While a better written novel than the sequel it isn't as fun. As pointed out by Stacey it's really nothing more than a glorified chase through a exotic series of sets. The future world of "Logan's Run" isn't as developed as it should be while predictions of future events are wildly off the mark; weighing the story down and hurting it as a result. A product of it's time (late Sixties) it's also apparent that the authors (who were in their late thirties and forties at the time of writing) didn't think very highly of the so-called Youth Culture/Counterculture. That isn't necessarily a bad thing (depending on one's political and social orientation I suppose), but it hurts "Logan's Run". This is one case in which the movie is better. Not a horrible book, but not all that great either.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    The novel Logan's Run was published 40 years ago & still holds up well as an entertaining piece of science fiction. I've always liked the 1976 film version starring Michael York & Jenny Agutter & was pleased to see that there were noticeable differences between the film & the novel. I wonder had the novel had been published today, in a world of The Hunger Games, Divergent etc, it might have been a huge hit & inspired a whole series of films & merchandise spin offs. While I would recommend the bo The novel Logan's Run was published 40 years ago & still holds up well as an entertaining piece of science fiction. I've always liked the 1976 film version starring Michael York & Jenny Agutter & was pleased to see that there were noticeable differences between the film & the novel. I wonder had the novel had been published today, in a world of The Hunger Games, Divergent etc, it might have been a huge hit & inspired a whole series of films & merchandise spin offs. While I would recommend the book to any fan of science fiction I must admit that I still prefer the film.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Logan's Run is one of those movies I grew up with, so even if it is quite silly, it has a special place in my sci-fi heart. Turns out the book is even sillier! The movie is much tighter, and better plotted. The book does contain the most 1960s sci-fi line I've read in a long while: "The tri-dimensional newsman was dressed in Lifeleather trimfits." Of course he was. Logan's Run is one of those movies I grew up with, so even if it is quite silly, it has a special place in my sci-fi heart. Turns out the book is even sillier! The movie is much tighter, and better plotted. The book does contain the most 1960s sci-fi line I've read in a long while: "The tri-dimensional newsman was dressed in Lifeleather trimfits." Of course he was.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I read this back in the 70s. The movie appeared (not a bad science fiction movie for the day) and I ran the book down. It was better than the movie by quite a bit. This is another cold war view of the future and a fairly dark outlook. While it's not the best or the worst one I read it's a fair read. I read this back in the 70s. The movie appeared (not a bad science fiction movie for the day) and I ran the book down. It was better than the movie by quite a bit. This is another cold war view of the future and a fairly dark outlook. While it's not the best or the worst one I read it's a fair read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    A rare case where the movie is better than the book, but still worth reading as a comparison between the two mediums. I think the book would have been more plausible if the max age had been the same as the movie (21 vs 30) Nonetheless, it's still a fun idea, and a sci fi classic. A rare case where the movie is better than the book, but still worth reading as a comparison between the two mediums. I think the book would have been more plausible if the max age had been the same as the movie (21 vs 30) Nonetheless, it's still a fun idea, and a sci fi classic.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    I always like the idea of reading old sci-fi more than the actual experience, and it certainly held true with this book as well. Logan's Run is, of course, iconic. Immortalized in a futuristic, and now cult-classic b-movie, it has cinematic influences on everything from Bladerunner to Minority Report. But there's really just not that much story here. Ultimately, that's what disappoints - that there could have been such an interesting story, but all we get is a chase through various decaying and I always like the idea of reading old sci-fi more than the actual experience, and it certainly held true with this book as well. Logan's Run is, of course, iconic. Immortalized in a futuristic, and now cult-classic b-movie, it has cinematic influences on everything from Bladerunner to Minority Report. But there's really just not that much story here. Ultimately, that's what disappoints - that there could have been such an interesting story, but all we get is a chase through various decaying and exotic scenes. Still, there are some passages that stand out, one being a (1967) impression of the modern Internet, described thus: "Here was a constellation of winking fireflies stretching to infinity. Here was an immense electronic silence. In the endless, glowing dark was Tangier and London, Macao and Capri and Beirut, El Quederef and Chateau-Chinon and Wounded Knee. From these caverns leapt the motive force of a dispensary in Chemnitz, a glasshouse in Shropshire, a call box in Billings, Montana ... This vast mountain brain sent it's signals along Earth's nervous system to the distant places, the villages, towns and cities, bringing order out of disorder, calmness out of confusion. They beheld the world. The final realization of the computer age. A direct extension of the electronic brains at Columbia and Cal Tech in the 1960s, it was a massive breakthrough in solid-state technology. Computer was linked with computer in ever widening complexity." Brilliant. And a giggle-worthy description of a "dirty bomb": “Brigadier General Matthew Pope authorized the use of one vest-pocket tactical atomic bomb. It was the last act of his life, and no other nuclear weapon was used in the Little War. Ground zero for the bomb was the site of the Smithsonian Institute – and the resultant crater was thereafter known as Pope's Hole. It was a remarkably dirty bomb, and for two weeks Washington was virtually uninhabitable – until the Geiger count fell low enough for observers to re-enter the city and test the atmosphere. Already the zoo animals had begun to breed.” “Heat from the nuclear explosion stored in tidal salts beneath the earth was still leaching out after all these years. The furnace heat, combined with the high humidity, had created a tropical rainforest. Winter ceased to exist in Washington.” I like a little humor in my fiction.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Love of Hopeless Causes

    A bitter disappointment after waiting years to acquire this. Minus one star for ubiquitous, unnamed, and unnecessary opening female point of view (third present?) Minus another for head hopping without achieving anything the main character couldn't have conveyed. Minus a third star for being repeatedly tossed into the deep end of this world's vocabulary and left to float without a life preserver. Minus another star for trying to turn narrative into poetry ( I believe Stephen King labels this stu A bitter disappointment after waiting years to acquire this. Minus one star for ubiquitous, unnamed, and unnecessary opening female point of view (third present?) Minus another for head hopping without achieving anything the main character couldn't have conveyed. Minus a third star for being repeatedly tossed into the deep end of this world's vocabulary and left to float without a life preserver. Minus another star for trying to turn narrative into poetry ( I believe Stephen King labels this stuff, "My Angry Lesbian Breasts," no offense to breasts, lesbians, or anger-heads intended on my part.) Whoops, straight outta fuc--stars--to give: whether they flash in handy color coded ways or not. You'd have to self publish this if you wrote it today, because the technology is built around what the authors wanted to happen, and not what we know computers are capable of, like shutting off access to elevators and credit cards. I wanted to gain a series read from this, but it only furthers a sneaking suspicion I've been nurturing, that the only Sci-fi worth a look is hot off the presses, otherwise it smacks of the backward times in which it was penned. Blech.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maria Lago

    ¿Pero a dónde te querías fugar, alma de cántaro? Si todo es la misma mierda.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Maye Holiday

    Logan's Run is an odd story, and always has been, but also an interesting and somewhat plausible one. My first experience with it had been the 1970's film, which took numerous liberties with the source material and which had more neon, glitter spandex and hedonistic sex than a key party in the back lot of a roller disco. I watched it back in the 5th grade - needless to say I had no idea what was going on in the story - but I had never really known that the book was a thing until recently. The boo Logan's Run is an odd story, and always has been, but also an interesting and somewhat plausible one. My first experience with it had been the 1970's film, which took numerous liberties with the source material and which had more neon, glitter spandex and hedonistic sex than a key party in the back lot of a roller disco. I watched it back in the 5th grade - needless to say I had no idea what was going on in the story - but I had never really known that the book was a thing until recently. The book is big in terms of time management and scenery; William F. Nolan's creative world-building and re-imagining of a dystopic future America takes every change into account, and creates an eerily modern, dark uncanny valley of the 20th century. In that regard, it's also an intriguing glimpse of what the vision of a future world by 1960's standards contained. That said, Logan's Run as a book is not, at least in my view, nearly as good as the film. While the film is dated by today's standards in many respects, it's still chilling and still holds up as powerful and emotional, not to mention that it had a plethora of well-developed characters: Logan himself, but also Jessica, Francis, Holly 13, and of course the "Old Man" and his beloved cats, just to name a few. The book features some of these characters, but it doesn't develop its characters or make them lovable figures to root for by any stretch of the imagination. Instead, it focuses very much on the scenario at hand, the disturbing sociopolitical undercurrents of this future, the ageism and sexuality and death, and that's all fine, except that as a reader, you're left wondering why you should even care, since there's little focus on the characters themselves. Logan's inner thoughts and commentary are given, but as a character, Logan often comes off as emotionally inept, selfish, and callous. These qualities are inconsistent throughout the story, but more often than not, they do appear. While both the film and book versions of Logan's Run had plot holes, including the self-defeating reliance on AI and technology to control things such as pregnancy/birth, death, jobs and the upkeep of infrastructure within the futuristic society, the film's focus on its characters and their philosophical journey made all of the other stuff not as important. The book, on the other hand, focuses so much on its world and imagined society that it loses the important quality of having interesting human beings. Even by 1960's standards, the book's plot is also rather dated and old-fashioned; it seems to suggest that the hippie counterculture and youth revolution will lead to a general hatred of the old, a startling affinity for sex and drugs, and a lack of any moral conscience. I suppose, looking back at Woodstock and Jim Morrison and all that, there was an undercurrent of hedonism and selfishness beneath all that peace and love rhetoric. Still, the film was a lot less black-and-white and more clever, pointing to an ambiguous, multi-faceted cause for society's shift to a pre-planned death, citing things such as overpopulation and pollution as the culprits, allowing viewers to draw their own conclusions and letting the material change with the times. Overpopulation and pollution are still issues we face today, and as such, the film is still considerable. The book, while interesting, largely just seems silly in comparison.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dori

    I admit I'm a little torn on this one. Written in the late 1960s, this sci-fi thriller had an interesting message and seems to have influenced a fair bit of modern sci-fi, but it was done in a somewhat superficial manner. A synopsis: It's a couple hundred years after the 20th century and nobody is allowed to live past age 21. The entire world is connected by a giant subway system controlled by a powerful computer in the heart of a mountain in the middle of America. Everyone wears implanted "flow I admit I'm a little torn on this one. Written in the late 1960s, this sci-fi thriller had an interesting message and seems to have influenced a fair bit of modern sci-fi, but it was done in a somewhat superficial manner. A synopsis: It's a couple hundred years after the 20th century and nobody is allowed to live past age 21. The entire world is connected by a giant subway system controlled by a powerful computer in the heart of a mountain in the middle of America. Everyone wears implanted "flowers" on their hands that are programmed to change color every seven years to denote different phases of life and, ultimately, to alert everyone to when a person is scheduled to go to Sleep, or surrender their lives at age 21. The people who refuse to go to Sleep are called Runners, and they are tracked down by an elite police force called Sandmen, who kill the Runner on sight. Presumably, all Runners are looking for Sanctuary, or the place where they can live out a natural human life. Logan is a Sandman who decides to run on his last day, teaming up with a female runner and going on an intense journey within the course of 24 hours that leads them to an underground railroad seeking Sanctuary. It reminded me a lot of the movie In Time, with regards to an artificially-set end of life for political and economic reasons. Whenever I read mid century sci-fi, I have to take a step back and remember that it's not derivative, but rather informative. Right now, this type of story seems completely overdone, but that's probably because it actually helped influence a fair amount of mediocre sci-fi currently being released. This story was a sort of "what if" scenario that doesn't really transcend time like 1984 or other great and beloved sci-fi stories have. Logan's Run was a result of the writers watching a cultural revolution take place in the late 60s, where young people changed the country, something not really seen before in America. With all the protests, riots, and incredible news coverage, the future probably felt incredibly tentative at that time. In that way, Logan's Run is an interesting historical document, looking into the minds of writers who were unsure what the cultural revolution could engender and wanted to pursue one outlandish avenue to its natural conclusion. Looking at that idea now, it seems ridiculous since all those hippies mellowed out and became the much-maligned baby boomer generation who grumps about the laziness of their kids and saps social security - basically what the authors of Logan's Run thought might be avoided if everyone committed suicide by 21. Ok, so maybe there still is something poignant about the story after all. On the flip side, I didn't love the writing. It was an action-packed thriller, low on character development and high on quick, sparse sentences and crazy-fast plot movement. The runners are dashing around the country, encountering new villains here and there and defeating them just as quickly as they meet them. It all felt more like a comic book than a novel, which just isn't my cup of tea. The authors (sci-fi guys William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson teaming up) do a decent job of quickly creating a vivid world and dystopian future, but it feels quite dated and more pulpy as opposed to literary. Though we are meant to have mixed feelings about Logan, who we know to be a killer but also a seeker of human connections, there's no real character arc that occurs and in fact, there's a strange climax to the novel where he maybe seems to go through some sort of inner turmoil, but it is very strangely executed and unclear whether or not his whole dash for freedom was planned by the Sandmen or not. This is part of the blurriness of the writing, where settings are much more fleshed out than people. The climax takes place in Washington, DC, which has become a tropical jungle due to a nuclear bomb explosion, and is infested with escaped zoo animals. I loved the imagery of this place, but everything that occurs there is like a fever dream of incomprehensible plot. I'll also say that Logan's fellow runner, Jessica, is a painfully useless character, playing the part of a beautiful, weak woman who constantly needs saving. *Eye roll*. It really makes me appreciate the new sci-fi heroines in the form of The Hunger Games and probably Divergent and stuff, according to the movie trailers I've seen. Because of its messy and immature writing style I can't say I really enjoyed it, but I do appreciate it as a valid influence on its genre and as a statement about the era in which it was written.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    A literary masterpiece this is not, but it's been influential to some extent in the world of sci-fi, especially film, and is good fun. Fueled by mid-20th century fears of global overpopulation, Logan's dystopian society is based on the concept of putting people out to pasture when they reach the ripe old age of 21 (30 in the film). It's rife with implausibilities and hastily explained settings and scene changes, but the action, at least, doesn't let up. A literary masterpiece this is not, but it's been influential to some extent in the world of sci-fi, especially film, and is good fun. Fueled by mid-20th century fears of global overpopulation, Logan's dystopian society is based on the concept of putting people out to pasture when they reach the ripe old age of 21 (30 in the film). It's rife with implausibilities and hastily explained settings and scene changes, but the action, at least, doesn't let up.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Can I make a confession here? I've never seen the movie version of "Logan's Run." I know, I know. I should probably turn in my geek card at this point. Either that or I should dust off the DVD version I picked up for a low price and put the shiny disc into the player and cross it off my list of shame. For a long time, my excuse has been that I'd never read the book. And once I found out that the book came first, as a book-a-holic, I could at least say that I wanted to read the book first. So, fina Can I make a confession here? I've never seen the movie version of "Logan's Run." I know, I know. I should probably turn in my geek card at this point. Either that or I should dust off the DVD version I picked up for a low price and put the shiny disc into the player and cross it off my list of shame. For a long time, my excuse has been that I'd never read the book. And once I found out that the book came first, as a book-a-holic, I could at least say that I wanted to read the book first. So, finally after years of searching used book stores and various books swapping sites for a reasonably priced copy of the book, I finally got one. And then it promptly sat on my to be read shelf for a long period of time. Then, I actually promised the book to a friend who loved the film but hadn't read the book. So, it was that I finally found myself at a point in time that I felt like it was time I should sit down and finally crack the cover of "Logan's Run." Was it worth the wait, the build-up and the hype? Yes and no. As with all books that are made into movies, it's nice to see what the authors originally intended for the world and characters to be on the printed page. The edition I acquired is an old one from the when the movie was out, so I had to resist the temptation to look at the 16 pages of full color photos from the film. Part of it was curiosity to see how my mental image of characters and settings was different and part of it was curiosity to see which parts of the books might be included and which might be dropped. Thankfully, I was able to resist the siren call of full color stills from the movie until after I'd read the final page. The story itself starts off fairly well. The concept of a future society in which overpopulation means everyone submits to death at the age of 21 is intriguing. Logan is part of the police force that hunts down those who don't want to die and become "runners." Logan is very good at what he does and doesn't really question his place in things. That is, until the crystal on his hand begins to blink red, indicating he has 24 hours to live. At times, the concept of people lining up for the death machines to terminate their lives reminded me a lot of classic Star Trek's "A Taste of Armageddon." But where that society was fighting a war via computers and counting up deaths to meet quotas and not violate a treaty, the society here is trying to curb overpopulation. At this point, some interesting ideas begin to crop up, including why this society chose 21 as the cut-off point for its people and what kind of impact it was having on the world. Is part of the future world of "Logan" that people mature faster? And how does the society function when run by the younger set without the older group there to guide them and offer wisdom and/or insight? Unfortunately, the novel never really delves into any of these questions. It also never delves much into how anything runs with any efficiency since it seems like there's not a lot of time to train people on how to do things or to give them time to learn new skills. How Logan becomes a great Sandman isn't really delved into and it's a question that could and should be addressed. Instead, the story is more of a straight-forward chase and adventure narrative. In many ways, it reminded me of 24 with characters chasing about from location to location geographically without any consideration for how long it might take people to get from here to there in the real universe. The story also could have used a lot more development in Logan as he goes from a man who decides if he's going out, he's going to take out the rebel sanctuary known as "Sanctuary" in his final day to being a guy who is on the run and could be a leader of the new rebellion. As far as I can tell, the book seems to say all you need is love and you'll become a revolutionary. It all ends up feeling like the novel is being written to be quickly and easily adapted as a screenplay. And it may work better as a movie. Looks like it's time to dust off that DVD and find out.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    This is a book I have been searching for, but was having trouble finding at the used book shops. I have always wanted to read it and to my great surprise, recieved it from my parents on my 25th birthday. It is the 1976 version with the silly picture insert of movie images. To say I was thrilled is a drastic understatement. In fact, no words can come close to describing the nerd-uphoria I felt. It took me very little time to read the tiny book, but it was quite the adventure and I would love to s This is a book I have been searching for, but was having trouble finding at the used book shops. I have always wanted to read it and to my great surprise, recieved it from my parents on my 25th birthday. It is the 1976 version with the silly picture insert of movie images. To say I was thrilled is a drastic understatement. In fact, no words can come close to describing the nerd-uphoria I felt. It took me very little time to read the tiny book, but it was quite the adventure and I would love to see them make a technologically advanced film version that actually matches the book instead of the weird 70's one. Logan's Run takes place in the not so distant future of 2116. There is rumor that one man, Ballard, is the oldest living man at age 42 which is twice the normal lifespan of 21. The new America is goverened by the young and moderated by an implant in the palm that signals when their life will end. Once the implant turns black, the person must voluntarily embrace the big Sleep. This has created runners and the Sandmen are forced to hunt them down and kill them. Logan is a Sandman who embarks on a journey, with a runner named Jessica, in his last 24 hours before his palm implant turns black. The break neck pace leaves very little time for deep character development, which is the only downside. You get a sense of who Logan is and his inner turmoil, but it isn't spoon fed to us like most novels. We can only see glimpses of Logan is flashback and see his choices to understand who he is. I personally loved it, despite its flaws and give it 4 out of 5 because I wish Logan and Jessica were developed on a deeper level.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Die Grundidee der Geschichte ist im Film genau so gut wie im Buch. Allerdings gefällt mir die Lösung, die der Film bietet, besser. Ansonsten muss ich sagen, dass ich das Buch gerade im Hinblick auf den Umgang der Menschen untereinander sehr aktuell finde. Läufer werden im Roman verachtet, verspottet, gehasst, verfolgt und getötet. Läufer sind Menschen, die das vom Regime vorgesehe maximale Lebensalter von 21 Jahren erreicht haben und sich nun nicht wie vorgesehen töten lassen wollen. Dafür werde Die Grundidee der Geschichte ist im Film genau so gut wie im Buch. Allerdings gefällt mir die Lösung, die der Film bietet, besser. Ansonsten muss ich sagen, dass ich das Buch gerade im Hinblick auf den Umgang der Menschen untereinander sehr aktuell finde. Läufer werden im Roman verachtet, verspottet, gehasst, verfolgt und getötet. Läufer sind Menschen, die das vom Regime vorgesehe maximale Lebensalter von 21 Jahren erreicht haben und sich nun nicht wie vorgesehen töten lassen wollen. Dafür werden sie geächtet und gejagt. Es gibt keinen rationalen Grund mehr für diese Regelung. Das Regime fordert bedingungslosen Gehorsam. Die Bevölkerung hinterfragt nicht einmal, wer dieses Regime ist. Anscheinend eine KI mit einem Programm, dass nicht der veränderten Situation angepasst wurde, weil niemand da ist, der das tuen könnte. Dafür leben sie nicht lange genug. Sie sind wie Eintagsfliegen, die ihre kurze Lebensspanne mit Spaß, Sex und Drogen ausfüllen. Für "erwachsene" Gedanken bleibt kein Raum.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fingon

    :Dživdžanzbori: Bolje od filma.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    The Tyranny of Pleasure 6 November 2012 I was wondering through a second hand book shop one day and found a book called 'Logan's Search'. I picked it up and discovered that it was the third book in the Logan trilogy, which made me realise that that really awesome movie that was made in 1975 was actually a book, and in fact the first in a trilogy. So began my quest to find a copy of the original book (as well as part two, which was easier than finding the first book, which I did eventually accompl The Tyranny of Pleasure 6 November 2012 I was wondering through a second hand book shop one day and found a book called 'Logan's Search'. I picked it up and discovered that it was the third book in the Logan trilogy, which made me realise that that really awesome movie that was made in 1975 was actually a book, and in fact the first in a trilogy. So began my quest to find a copy of the original book (as well as part two, which was easier than finding the first book, which I did eventually accomplish, otherwise I wouldn't be writing this commentary). Anyway, I found it, and I read it, and I must say, I so much preferred the movie, which is generally odd because it is that the book is supposed to be better. Now, I could give you a run down of the plot to this book, but I won't waste my time. Rather direct you to the IMBD page relating to the movie which was made of this book, and if you what to read my review of the film, you can find it here. So, rather than go over old ground, I think I will simply jump straight to what this book is about and the themes which arise from it. In a way this book (I keep on wanting to write movie because, as I have said, the movie is substantially better than the book) is very much like 1984, though unlike that novel this book has a happy ending because the blinkers are taken off of the eyes of the people and they are freed from their dystopian world to be able to think for themselves. This book (or movie) is about freedom and how, in many ways, what we think is freedom may actually enslave us. In this dystopian world people live a hedonistic life. While there are basic laws (I suspect murder is still illegal) there is no barrier to any hedonistic desire. There is no marriage, no commitment, and no property. Everybody has everything they want and they can take anything they want. However, there is still some barriers, because it appears that people have a right to say no (as Jessica does to Logan's advances). However, there is a catch: they must die at the age of 30 (21 on the book). I suspect the age of 21 is more relevant, and by raising it to 30 in the movie undermines this somewhat. Basically what is happening is knowledge is being destroyed. The only knowledge that is stored and allowed to be stored, is by the computer (while there appears to be no government, there is a government and it is a dictatorship of the machine). Simply put, by preventing people from growing old, and in fact by preventing multiple generations from being alive concurrently, the machine is able to control knowledge. Nobody is able to pass knowledge down from one generation to another, and thus people live in blissful ignorance. Society, in Logan's Run, is stagnant. It simply does not move. There is no incentive to learn, and in fact it is quite clear that one of the major crimes is to think. Further, by destroying marital relationships the machine is further able to control society. There is no bonding, no friendship, and thus no ability to rebel. Further, there is no family unit, which is another means of control and another means of destroying knowledge. Without a family unit, there is no respect, and no older person from which one can learn, and as such the computer once again controls the people. I have seen that this is the case in this world. In one way the sexual revolution in the sixties freed us from the tyranny of the religious right only to enslave us in the tyranny of the hedonistic world. Fifty years on we can see that the tyranny of hedonism has become almost complete. We are bombarded with advertisements telling us that what is important is to feel good. While we have legalised abortion and prostitution, which in one sense frees us from one form of tyranny, it also enslaves us in another form. I am not one to seek to overturn those laws, I believe those laws are necessary, but what we need to do is to realise that our desire for pleasure is what enslaves us, and this is a tyranny of the mind, a tyranny that convinces us that we do not need to think, that we do not need to open our minds, and that we only need to live for the now and for what makes us feel good. The second tyranny is the tyranny of the generation, and that is where we are denied the wisdom of the older generation and only able listen to those of our peers. Let us consider the first chapter of the first book of kings. The son of king Solomon, is faced with a choice. The people approach him and ask him to release them from their burdens and the older generation tell him that it is wise to do that because if he does that the people will respect him as a king. However, the younger generation tell him that if he were to release them of their burdens then they will be uncontrollable, and the fact that they are free to grumble about their predicament indicates that they are a danger and therefore they need to be oppressed more. The choice the king has is whether to listen to the wisdom of his elders of the wisdom of his peers. He chooses to listen to the wisdom of his peers, which results in a disaster for him. I see this problem in some churches that I have attended. The generations are separated, and are led by their peers rather than their elders. As such, the young Christians are deprived of a vital source of wisdom and their minds are clouded by the ignorance of their peers. I suspected that this was a problem and noted that none of my peers would listen to me, coming up with half-cocked excuses as to why it could not work. So, I decided to test the theory out myself, and found a church of elders rather than peers, and have since discovered that I have learned more in eleven weeks amongst my Christian elders than I did over eleven years amongst by Christian peers. In a way, many religious people actually fear knowledge because knowledge causes us to think, and then to question. Thus to prevent us from thinking and from questioning, they starve us of a vital source of knowledge, and that is the wisdom of our elders. Consider this picture (which many of us have probably seen already, but I think that it illustrates my point quite clearly): Granted, it deals with the Taliban and the education of women, but I believe that it extends quite further beyond that. In fact it extends even into Christianity, and not necessarily the Religious Right. A church that I have been too would regularly encourage us to read the Bible, but only prescribed texts relating to the Bible. Further, they would tell us before the sermon that we should look in the Bible so that 'we should see that what they were saying was true'. One thing they did not have at the end of the sermon, though, was a question time. This was something that I pushed for because I believe that being able to ask the pastor a question in front of the congregation is a means of holding him accountable. However, the catch was that when they did open the floor to questions they would be filtered through a mobile phone. Further, only the experienced pastors would field the questions because they could be assured to be able to follow the party line. When I asked why one of the junior pastors did not field questions I was simply told that it was because he would find answering questions a little too difficult. I want to finish this off with the question of abortion. You may ask what this has to do with knowledge, and I will simply say it has more to do what what they don't say than what they do say. Now, before I continue, I will say that I do and always will support the voice of those who do not have a voice. That includes the unborn, however, the pro-life movement cares less for the rights of the unborn than they do for the oppression of the rights of women. Consider this, would a ban on abortion turn an unwanted pregnancy into a wanted pregnancy? Highly unlikely. Either it will force the woman to have an unsafe abortion, or force a child into a horrible existence. In fact, by banning abortion, it is more likely that poverty will increase, as a single mother looking after a child will be unable to work therefore leaving both of them in poverty. Now, you notice how I said single mother? Guess what, a woman seeking an abortion is much more likely to be single than to be in a relationship. The reason I say this is because pregnancy punishes the woman more than it does the man. So, why should a woman be punished more for engaging in fornication than the man? Does that seem just? To me it is not, because the man can simply disappear leaving the woman carrying the burden of his lust. Sure, the man will no doubt face judgement come judgement day, but the woman is left in a situation that in reality is untenable. This is what I mean about the denial of knowledge and the denial of the ability to be able to think. Thus, while they scream and cry about the rights of the unborn, they distract us from the fact that what they are really doing is oppressing women. What needs to be done is to make birth control more readily available, and moreso, a change in thinking about the pleasures and the desires of sex. What we really need to do is to turn away from our hedonistic thinking and actually open our eyes up to the world around us. We need to stop living for the now, and actually start living for the future.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Иван Величков

    Интересно. Уилиам Нолан е доста популярен като хорър автор, най-вече на разкази, но това е най-известната му книга (всъщност трилогия). Може би заради филмовата версия излязла десетина години по-късно. Близкото му приятелство с Бредбъри и Матисън прави тяхната писателска "Southern California Group" едно от най-влиятелните за времето си явления в жанра (и то още преди да е именуван и прилежно подреден по лавиците в книжарниците). Романът е доста трудно да се категоризира жанрово (както и цялото тв Интересно. Уилиам Нолан е доста популярен като хорър автор, най-вече на разкази, но това е най-известната му книга (всъщност трилогия). Може би заради филмовата версия излязла десетина години по-късно. Близкото му приятелство с Бредбъри и Матисън прави тяхната писателска "Southern California Group" едно от най-влиятелните за времето си явления в жанра (и то още преди да е именуван и прилежно подреден по лавиците в книжарниците). Романът е доста трудно да се категоризира жанрово (както и цялото творчество на Нолан). Започва като микс между „1984” и „Децата на царевицата”, той и чисто хронологически е между тях. После много бързо минава в класическа пълп фантастика, въпреки че най-добрите години на въпросните списания вече изтичат. И накрая завършва в пълно бъроузово безумие с оттенък на Харлан Елисън. Интересно как са виждали авторите бъдещето на човечеството, когато още е около 4 милиарда и преди органичните торове и тяхната зелена революция. Не за първи път попадам на прогностики, че земята ще се срине още на 6 милиарда души. Решението предлагано тук е доста крайно и авторът го нарича Малката война: „Семената на Малката война бяха посадени в едно неспокойно лято в средата на шейсетте, чрез седянки и студентски демонстрации, като младите тестваха силата си. В началото на седемдесетте няд 75% от хората, живеещи на Земята бяха под 21 години. Популацията продължи да расте, а с нея и процента на младите. През 1980 цифрата беше 79.7 % През 1990 – 82.4% През 2000 – критична маса.” От тук следва една младежка революция, която превзема света, защото в повечето контролиращи органи така и така има само младежи. Налага се вето за максимална възраст от 21 години (във фима е 30, но кинаджиите винаги са били бъзльовци), после те рециклират (както казах, човечеството е 6 милиарда и храната е проблем). Системата се контролира от наглед вездесъщ изкуствен интелект наричан „Мислителя.”, а опитващите се да избегнат „съня” са преследвани от елитен отдел изтребители. Логан е един от тях и то фанатично предан. За това в последния си ден решава да се внедри в организацията на „бегълците” и да пречука Балард – човек-легенда оцелял два пъти по-дълго от всеки (което май е въпросът към 42). За нещастие се забърква със симпатична бегълка, която май му обърква програмирането (класика). Останалата част от книгата е едно безумно препускане из световни дестинации, които са от безумни по-безумни и ни показват (а и на нашето момче), че има нещо гнило в Дания и системата явно дава яки бъгове. Има един финален обрат тип бога от машината, който беше леко излишен. Има и типичните за времето на написването, изключително слаби женски образи. Има обаче и доста нетипични за времето насилие, секс, друсане, които макар и да са след първите опити на Ф.Х.Фармър (даже са след жалките имитации на Хайнлайн), са доволно новаторски. А има и похвати доста напомнящи на Филип К. Дик, а са писани преди най-добрите му години. Като цяло видях в ретроспекция доста солидно влияние на това произведение над много автори и още повече режисьори. Особено тотално безумните локации, които се вкарват с кратка презентация на упадък, а после героят избухва вътре в още по-безумно действие, така типично за траши кинофантастиката на осемдесетте. Бе доволен съм, макар произведението да не е остаряло особено красиво. Ще взема да изгледам филма, преди да продължа с останалите две части. А, като си говорим за антиутопията като термин - това определено е такова. Има си икономическа обосновка, стабилни регулиращи органи и необходимите пробойни. За разлика от 99.9% от съвремените произведения опитващи се да минат за антиутопии, докато са зле маскирана пропаганда на определени идеи.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Bastian

    Classic science fiction doesn't always match the expectations built into the moniker. While the 1967 dystopic offered themes easily configurable for the big screen, including its own cinematic adaptation in 1976, the narrative itself is little more than a jump-cut blitz through an increasingly exotic series of sets. Some of these sets are truly memorable (the ice prison in particular), but most serve as mere waystations until the next plot twist whisks the duo away to an ever more harrowing enco Classic science fiction doesn't always match the expectations built into the moniker. While the 1967 dystopic offered themes easily configurable for the big screen, including its own cinematic adaptation in 1976, the narrative itself is little more than a jump-cut blitz through an increasingly exotic series of sets. Some of these sets are truly memorable (the ice prison in particular), but most serve as mere waystations until the next plot twist whisks the duo away to an ever more harrowing encounter. Typically you have three elements associated with sci-fi permanence and the makings of a classic, only the first of which is specific to the genre: 1) imaginative spins on science and technology, 2) unique, memorably developed characters and 3) great writing. Logan's Run is all but devoid of #2 and is spotty in #s 1 and 3. Though vividly presented, there isn't much on the futuristic side I would consider prescient, the writing is uneven, often paced in a stream-of-consciousness kind of way, and Logan and Jessica are reduced to vehicles for the authors' action-heavy head trips. But so long as you don't expect too much, it is quite fun. While it hasn't aged as well as one might have hoped, Logan's Run is still worth reading for the quick thrills and its thought-provoking solution to overpopulation. Oh, and there are kick-ass guns, which is always a crowd-pleaser.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Veeral

    This might be the worst book I have read this year. Here is the plot: In a dystopian future world, nobody should live for more than 21 years. They should go to ‘Sleep’. Logan who is a sandman - policeman of the future - who catches the ‘runners’ (people who run instead of going to ‘Sleep’ when their time has come), decides to become a ‘runner’ himself when it is his time to die. End of the Story. Really. William F. Nolan never thought beyond this point. Even the end could not salvage this wreck o This might be the worst book I have read this year. Here is the plot: In a dystopian future world, nobody should live for more than 21 years. They should go to ‘Sleep’. Logan who is a sandman - policeman of the future - who catches the ‘runners’ (people who run instead of going to ‘Sleep’ when their time has come), decides to become a ‘runner’ himself when it is his time to die. End of the Story. Really. William F. Nolan never thought beyond this point. Even the end could not salvage this wreck of a novel. It felt forced and cheesy. I have read grocery lists better written and more interesting than this abomination.

  26. 5 out of 5

    TraceyL

    Cool idea which inspired many other works of science fiction. Although it's pretty action-packed, I wasn't attached to the characters and the story fell a little flat for me. I won't continue in the series. Cool idea which inspired many other works of science fiction. Although it's pretty action-packed, I wasn't attached to the characters and the story fell a little flat for me. I won't continue in the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ana Cristina Lee

    No será una obra maestra de la ciencia ficción pero me resultó muy entretenido. Creo que ha sido fuente de inspiración para muchas otras obras posteriores.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    It's a bit different from the movie version. All action, with very little character development. I definitely liked the movie better. It's a bit different from the movie version. All action, with very little character development. I definitely liked the movie better.

  29. 5 out of 5

    ☆Ruth☆

    This is a relatively short book but so packed full of action and fast-moving that I had to keep pausing and checking back to make sure I hadn't missed anything on the way! It's also the type of book that I would like to read twice: the first time to purely enjoy it and the second time to better understand it :D. This is a relatively short book but so packed full of action and fast-moving that I had to keep pausing and checking back to make sure I hadn't missed anything on the way! It's also the type of book that I would like to read twice: the first time to purely enjoy it and the second time to better understand it :D.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katy Berg

    I have a soft spot for literary classics, and I'm so glad that my dad recommended this book to me. I personally believe that this is one of the greatest science fiction stories of all time. The way it's written makes you wonder if humanity can be so cold in the future. In a world where you die at 21, it is easy to see a world of the kind of chaos that would come from a world run by children. This is a world where killers are heroes. One of these killers, or 'sandmen', as they're called in the bo I have a soft spot for literary classics, and I'm so glad that my dad recommended this book to me. I personally believe that this is one of the greatest science fiction stories of all time. The way it's written makes you wonder if humanity can be so cold in the future. In a world where you die at 21, it is easy to see a world of the kind of chaos that would come from a world run by children. This is a world where killers are heroes. One of these killers, or 'sandmen', as they're called in the book, kills runners. Runners are people who are trying to escape their fate by running away from the city when they turn 21, or when the flower in their right hand turns black. Since you can read a summary of the book above, I'll just skip to what I thought of it. The first part of it didn't exactly make sense, and to be honest, I had to force myself to finish the first half. It was written in a weird style that seemed almost inhuman in a way. But the father Logan went on his journey, the easier it was to read. I have a theory about this, but i'll talk about that in a second. You could see a change in Logan, and the more the book went on,the more he started wanting to live. He realized that killing the runners was wrong. And this is the theory that I came up with so here it is. I think that the writing style of the book changed with Logan. The more human he became, the easier and more human the writing was. It was as if the book were his soul. In the beginning when he's in the glasshouse, he seems so cold; but when he's in the plains and has to save Jessica, he becomes human and loving. The ending is unsettling for many people, but I thought it was perfect. It's bittersweet hope, which is what humans have in everyday life. It's real. And to be honest, a little too real for comfort. Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day.

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