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The Holy Land & Egypt and Nubia - Folio Society Limited Edition

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David Roberts was the first British painter to make an artistic expedition to Egypt and the Holy Land. The result of his travels was a picturesque vision of the Near East that has been hugely influential ever since. Nearly 200 years later, his work is held in institutions such as the Library of Congress in Washington and London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. David Roberts wa David Roberts was the first British painter to make an artistic expedition to Egypt and the Holy Land. The result of his travels was a picturesque vision of the Near East that has been hugely influential ever since. Nearly 200 years later, his work is held in institutions such as the Library of Congress in Washington and London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. David Roberts was an artist with ambition. Born in relative poverty outside Edinburgh, he spent years developing his skills as an apprentice and a jobbing artisan, graduating to a career painting backdrops for the theatre, first in Edinburgh and then in London’s Covent Garden and Drury Lane. By 1837, he had achieved renown for his landscape paintings of the Rhine and Spain. Unlike most artists, who relied on sketches brought back by other travellers, Roberts had visited these countries himself. His adventurous approach and his technical brilliance would serve him well on the journey of a lifetime – an artistic pilgrimage to Egypt and the Holy Land, the first ever undertaken by a British artist. Roberts set off in August 1838, travelling from London to Marseilles and on to Alexandria. From there he began his journey up the Nile with a crew of six men. In Cairo, he determined to record modern buildings as well as ancient, and made sketches of minarets, alleys and marketplaces. His observations remain among the few records we have of the early 19th-century city. Ultimately continuing as far south as Abu Simbel, Roberts produced over 100 sketches on his journey through Egypt, saying: ‘We shall see what impression they make in England.’ Roberts next set his sights on Palestine. He travelled across the Sinai desert along the route thought to have been taken by the Israelites when they left Egypt for the Promised Land. He and his team slept in tents under the stars and took shelter in the Monastery of St Catherine, where Roberts produced some of his most famous vistas of the Holy Land. Jerusalem was closed to visitors because of plague, but Roberts’s luck held and he was able to enter during Holy Week. It was the memorable culmination of an extraordinary voyage. As well as having visited biblical sites from the Mount of Olives to Jericho, he had assembled, as he put it, ‘one of the richest folios that ever left the East’. On his return to London, Roberts sought a publisher for his work, eventually signing a contract with Francis G. Moon for £3,000 – a vast sum, equivalent to over £200,000 today. Critics and the public lined up to praise Roberts’s works when they were first exhibited. The press lauded the aesthetic quality of his art, its historical and topographical accuracy, and the grandeur of its subject matter. Publication of the first edition was a slow and enormously expensive process. It was printed in sections, each one containing six hand-coloured lithographs created from the original drawings. But Moon’s investment paid off. There was no shortage of subscribers, with Queen Victoria (to whom the Holy Land series is dedicated) and Charles Dickens among those reserving a set. Roberts’s pictures had caught the imagination of the British public and set a trend for Orientalism in art that would continue to shape the way in which the West perceived the East. The Folio Society limited edition of The Holy Land and Egypt and Nubia, which replicated the size of the original edition, was enormously popular and quickly sold out. To make this magnificent collection available to a wider audience, we have published this fine edition, which brings together all 247 lithographs in a smaller format. 2 magnificent volumes measuring 14¾" x 10¾" Bound in cloth and blocked with designs by Neil Gower Gilded top edges, ribbon marker Presented in individual slipcases The Holy Land: Syria, Idumea and Arabia 296 pages, including 123 plates, portrait of Roberts and map Egypt and Nubia 272 pages, including 124 plates and map


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David Roberts was the first British painter to make an artistic expedition to Egypt and the Holy Land. The result of his travels was a picturesque vision of the Near East that has been hugely influential ever since. Nearly 200 years later, his work is held in institutions such as the Library of Congress in Washington and London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. David Roberts wa David Roberts was the first British painter to make an artistic expedition to Egypt and the Holy Land. The result of his travels was a picturesque vision of the Near East that has been hugely influential ever since. Nearly 200 years later, his work is held in institutions such as the Library of Congress in Washington and London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. David Roberts was an artist with ambition. Born in relative poverty outside Edinburgh, he spent years developing his skills as an apprentice and a jobbing artisan, graduating to a career painting backdrops for the theatre, first in Edinburgh and then in London’s Covent Garden and Drury Lane. By 1837, he had achieved renown for his landscape paintings of the Rhine and Spain. Unlike most artists, who relied on sketches brought back by other travellers, Roberts had visited these countries himself. His adventurous approach and his technical brilliance would serve him well on the journey of a lifetime – an artistic pilgrimage to Egypt and the Holy Land, the first ever undertaken by a British artist. Roberts set off in August 1838, travelling from London to Marseilles and on to Alexandria. From there he began his journey up the Nile with a crew of six men. In Cairo, he determined to record modern buildings as well as ancient, and made sketches of minarets, alleys and marketplaces. His observations remain among the few records we have of the early 19th-century city. Ultimately continuing as far south as Abu Simbel, Roberts produced over 100 sketches on his journey through Egypt, saying: ‘We shall see what impression they make in England.’ Roberts next set his sights on Palestine. He travelled across the Sinai desert along the route thought to have been taken by the Israelites when they left Egypt for the Promised Land. He and his team slept in tents under the stars and took shelter in the Monastery of St Catherine, where Roberts produced some of his most famous vistas of the Holy Land. Jerusalem was closed to visitors because of plague, but Roberts’s luck held and he was able to enter during Holy Week. It was the memorable culmination of an extraordinary voyage. As well as having visited biblical sites from the Mount of Olives to Jericho, he had assembled, as he put it, ‘one of the richest folios that ever left the East’. On his return to London, Roberts sought a publisher for his work, eventually signing a contract with Francis G. Moon for £3,000 – a vast sum, equivalent to over £200,000 today. Critics and the public lined up to praise Roberts’s works when they were first exhibited. The press lauded the aesthetic quality of his art, its historical and topographical accuracy, and the grandeur of its subject matter. Publication of the first edition was a slow and enormously expensive process. It was printed in sections, each one containing six hand-coloured lithographs created from the original drawings. But Moon’s investment paid off. There was no shortage of subscribers, with Queen Victoria (to whom the Holy Land series is dedicated) and Charles Dickens among those reserving a set. Roberts’s pictures had caught the imagination of the British public and set a trend for Orientalism in art that would continue to shape the way in which the West perceived the East. The Folio Society limited edition of The Holy Land and Egypt and Nubia, which replicated the size of the original edition, was enormously popular and quickly sold out. To make this magnificent collection available to a wider audience, we have published this fine edition, which brings together all 247 lithographs in a smaller format. 2 magnificent volumes measuring 14¾" x 10¾" Bound in cloth and blocked with designs by Neil Gower Gilded top edges, ribbon marker Presented in individual slipcases The Holy Land: Syria, Idumea and Arabia 296 pages, including 123 plates, portrait of Roberts and map Egypt and Nubia 272 pages, including 124 plates and map

35 review for The Holy Land & Egypt and Nubia - Folio Society Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shyam

    Sketches have been variously given in this work; for the purpose of rendering the untravelled inquirer master of the characteristic scenery of events associated with the noblest recollections, and the most stupendous interests of mankind. . . . whose memory has given a character and an impulse to every succeeding period of mankind; that he stands where they taught, and suffered, and triumphed; that he looks on the landscape on which they so often gazed; and that he sees the same grandeur and Sketches have been variously given in this work; for the purpose of rendering the untravelled inquirer master of the characteristic scenery of events associated with the noblest recollections, and the most stupendous interests of mankind. . . . whose memory has given a character and an impulse to every succeeding period of mankind; that he stands where they taught, and suffered, and triumphed; that he looks on the landscape on which they so often gazed; and that he sees the same grandeur and beauty, the same wild majesty or cultured loveliness, which so often lifted their hearts in strains . . . __________ Truly beautiful depictions of the Holy Land, Egypt, and Nubia, by Mr. Roberts. __________ . . . the magnificent elevation of heart and understanding, the ardour of feeling and the blaze of knowledge, which must have made his solitary hours glorious, form a character altogether above the stature of the world. —Dr. Croly, Introductory History of Israel, The Holy Land The Khasnè strikes all eyes,. And the advantage of its position, which has greatly protected it from the effect of time, presents it in almost the perfection of its first day. It is universally acknowledged to be exquisitely beautiful, and to produce a more powerful impression than any surviving monument even of Greece or Rome. . . . more undisturbed possession of solitude is left to the Great Sphinx, the most extraordinary of the productions of man in this land of his wonders. After drawing and studying it, Mr. Roberts said that he had had more powerful emotions excited by it than by the pyramids. It is only on coming near that you are overwhelmed with astonishment: you must be under these stupendous masses—you must look up to them, and walk around them—before you can feel that neither language nor painting can convey a just idea of the emotions they excite The finely sculptured shafts, the elegant and varied devices and forms of the capitals, derived from the fruits and leavers of the date, the vine, and the lotus, are proofs, that to limit such a member to the sameness, however beautiful, of the capitals of Greek columns, is an unworthy restraint upon the human mind which can produce such exquisite variety. From the total want of moisture, the very stones when struck ring like a bell. Warburton describes the whole island [of Philæ] as not being more than fifty acres in size, but as richer, perhaps, in objects of interest than any spot of similar extent in the world. This portico to the catacombs is remarkable, as it probably illustrates the origin of the Doric order of the Greeks. At all events it shows that its principles existed among the ancient Egyptians any a very remote period, at least 1500BC, and, therefore, earlier than any known Greek temple. The most inserting objects in the neighbourhood of Asouan are the syenite and granite quarries, which supplied the vast demands of Egypt, in ancient times, for obelisks, columns, and other massive requisites for their temples. The Artist’s object in selecting these different views of Karnak has ben to convey to the untravelled in Egypt. Some idea of those stupendous works, with have left an undying fame to her Pharaohs. It is difficult for the mind to conceive a scene of more impressive interest. Where busy millions have trod, all is now decayed and desolate: leaving only as a record of the greatness of its Pharaohs, structures so vast, even in their ruins, that nothing exists in any other county, within thousands of years of the age of their erection, to mark such power and greatness in any other former age and people. And when all this was perfect . . . when its courts were paced by gorgeous priestly pageants, and busy life swarmed on a river flowing between banks of palaces, like those of Venice magnified a hundred-fold; when all this was in its prime, no wonder that its fame spread even over the barbarian world, and found immortality in Homer's song. In the description which has been given of another view of these statues, it is stated that they both represented the Pharaoh Amunoph III., the sovereign of the Hebrew Exodus; but the romance of history has given interest to that statue whoosh, as they are here presented from behind, is seen on thee left. It is the Vocal Memnon, so called from the early belief, that at sunrise sounds issued from it; and this is attested by travellers who heard and recorded it by inscriptions on the statue eighteen centuries ago . . . The sound said to be emitted by the statue has been attested by many hearers, who have recorded their impressions in inscriptions which are legible on the legs and feet of the statue. That it was a tricky of the priests there can be no doubt,. As a stone is still found in the lap of the statue which when struck is sonorous like brass: this was verified by Wilkinson, and confirms what is recorded in an inscription by one Ballilla, that the sound might be compared to the striking of brass. The Emperor Hadrian has heard it three times—a princely compliment to the sovereign and his consort, or too the ladies who accompanied them; for the names still appear, among others in the inscriptions, of Julia Romilla and Cecilia Treboulla. Beauty is its characteristic; for however much the ancient structures of Egypt may, by their vastness and extent, and the magnitude of their imposing parts, cause us to reflect upon the powers employed to construct and arrange them, and thus impress us deeply with emotions of the sublime—in beauty, Philæ, with its temples, has no rival on its sacred river.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Varmint

    beautiful illustrations of egypt and the holy land in early unexcavated, unrestored conditions. then contrasted with modern photos. some of the sites no longer exist, or have been so altered as to be unrecognizable. was irritated to discover that they didn't reproduce the entire folios. beautiful illustrations of egypt and the holy land in early unexcavated, unrestored conditions. then contrasted with modern photos. some of the sites no longer exist, or have been so altered as to be unrecognizable. was irritated to discover that they didn't reproduce the entire folios.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amir Makar

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Renne

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tristan

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mikey

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tony Hale

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alexandros

  12. 5 out of 5

    Omowale Jabali

  13. 4 out of 5

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  14. 5 out of 5

    Jovan Brooks

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rae

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hosam Taher

  17. 4 out of 5

    Reem

  18. 4 out of 5

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  19. 5 out of 5

    Timvdh

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caleb

  21. 5 out of 5

    Me

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Ramzee

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nagola

  24. 5 out of 5

    Crazyarms777

  25. 4 out of 5

    libraryfacts

  26. 4 out of 5

    Doshare

  27. 5 out of 5

    G.A. Reed

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andriesm

  29. 5 out of 5

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  30. 5 out of 5

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  31. 5 out of 5

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  32. 4 out of 5

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  33. 5 out of 5

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  34. 5 out of 5

    Juli

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sameh Allam

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