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Tigger on the Couch: The Neuroses, Psychoses, Disorders and Maladies of Our Favourite Children's Characters

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Packed with uproarious yet decidedly accurate case studies, this is a unique look at the mental disorders plaguing our beloved childhood characters. Critical questions concerning a range of classic individuals are all answered, including: Should Tigger have received treatment for hyperactivity? If Beauty had told her therapist about her relationship with the Beast, would s Packed with uproarious yet decidedly accurate case studies, this is a unique look at the mental disorders plaguing our beloved childhood characters. Critical questions concerning a range of classic individuals are all answered, including: Should Tigger have received treatment for hyperactivity? If Beauty had told her therapist about her relationship with the Beast, would she have been diagnosed as co-dependant? and Did Winnie the Pooh have an addictive personality? Each study also looks into how these characters presented ideas of love, life, inner peace, and good mental health to generations of children. So lay back on the big couch and learn all about the traits, diagnoses, and theoretical treatment programs for your favorite friends.


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Packed with uproarious yet decidedly accurate case studies, this is a unique look at the mental disorders plaguing our beloved childhood characters. Critical questions concerning a range of classic individuals are all answered, including: Should Tigger have received treatment for hyperactivity? If Beauty had told her therapist about her relationship with the Beast, would s Packed with uproarious yet decidedly accurate case studies, this is a unique look at the mental disorders plaguing our beloved childhood characters. Critical questions concerning a range of classic individuals are all answered, including: Should Tigger have received treatment for hyperactivity? If Beauty had told her therapist about her relationship with the Beast, would she have been diagnosed as co-dependant? and Did Winnie the Pooh have an addictive personality? Each study also looks into how these characters presented ideas of love, life, inner peace, and good mental health to generations of children. So lay back on the big couch and learn all about the traits, diagnoses, and theoretical treatment programs for your favorite friends.

30 review for Tigger on the Couch: The Neuroses, Psychoses, Disorders and Maladies of Our Favourite Children's Characters

  1. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Solera

    I've been looking for a book that would analyze the psychological disorders of characters from Winnie the Pooh for a while now - and I'm perfectly serious about that. Laura James' book is just that, plus analyses of the neuroses of many other famous characters from the panoply of childhood stories. Although the subject matter is nothing to laugh at, one can't help but giggle at the serious approach that the author takes when discussing the mental hiccups that characters like Piglet commit, especi I've been looking for a book that would analyze the psychological disorders of characters from Winnie the Pooh for a while now - and I'm perfectly serious about that. Laura James' book is just that, plus analyses of the neuroses of many other famous characters from the panoply of childhood stories. Although the subject matter is nothing to laugh at, one can't help but giggle at the serious approach that the author takes when discussing the mental hiccups that characters like Piglet commit, especially since we experienced their stories in such a light-hearted way as children. James' book is a quick read, mostly because she devotes equal page space to each case study, making the whole reading experience feel like a workbook. I'd recommend this book to anyone who enjoys pitting fantasy against the careful scrutiny of a licensed professional. You won't learn about the intricacies of psychology, but you will ask yourself how you grew up so well despite the sociopaths in your bookshelves.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    This book is awful... first of all, the author tries to talk about something she simply doesn't understand. She is not a psychologist or has any type of academic background that would make this analysis possible. She stays in the common sense, not even exploring the matters. She contradicts herself and writes pointless things such as what is the diet of the character? then answers: I have no idea. I thought this was going to be an interesting book, but it is really really not satisfying for the pu This book is awful... first of all, the author tries to talk about something she simply doesn't understand. She is not a psychologist or has any type of academic background that would make this analysis possible. She stays in the common sense, not even exploring the matters. She contradicts herself and writes pointless things such as what is the diet of the character? then answers: I have no idea. I thought this was going to be an interesting book, but it is really really not satisfying for the purposes it says it has. Of course, it can be entertaining, and maybe she wrote it as a joke. Cause that's how it seems like. I don't recommend this book for anyone who might be interested in the depths of fairy tale character's personalities. The author simply hasn't done enough study to write about something as complex as this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Xanthi

    An odd book, in that it is mildly amusing and quite tongue in cheek, whilst being about mental disorders and psychological issues. Serious topics handled frivolously, and hence my slight uneasiness about the book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rhona Crawford

    I enjoyed the book. I understand the criticism that the author is not a qualified practitioner, but it gives a layman's overview and is helpful in recognising (not diagnosing) possible problems, especially if you are working with a huge number of people on a daily basis I enjoyed the book. I understand the criticism that the author is not a qualified practitioner, but it gives a layman's overview and is helpful in recognising (not diagnosing) possible problems, especially if you are working with a huge number of people on a daily basis

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kitten

    Around the Year in 52 Books 2021: A non-fiction book other than biography, autobiography or memoir.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Hickman Walker

    This is a fun analysis of fairy tale and other characters, attempting to diagnose whatever mental maladies they may have. In addition to that, I found it useful in explaining a variety of personality disorders (some of which I'd never even heard of!) in a fun and accessible way. I wouldn't recommend reading it through in one sitting as I did though. It can get a bit repetitive, there are a surprising number of characters suffering from the same problems. I suppose that shouldn't be surprising wh This is a fun analysis of fairy tale and other characters, attempting to diagnose whatever mental maladies they may have. In addition to that, I found it useful in explaining a variety of personality disorders (some of which I'd never even heard of!) in a fun and accessible way. I wouldn't recommend reading it through in one sitting as I did though. It can get a bit repetitive, there are a surprising number of characters suffering from the same problems. I suppose that shouldn't be surprising when analysing fairy tale characters, but it does make the book a little flat in places.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Saxton

    This book definitely makes mental illness more accessible and was a valid effort at removing stigma around mental illness. As mentioned by other reviews it would have been better if the author was more familiar with mental illness as some parts felt very bland and repetitive. Would recommend just to raise awareness of different mental illnesses though it is important that other sources are also looked at.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I've had this book for a few years, and I just picked it back up recently. I felt I was able to appreciate this book all over again now this time, and I love reading over the checklists, which are not only fun, but seem right away to wash all doubt as to the character of each disorder or malady. I also think using the characters the way they did was brilliant, and something anyone could relate to, no matter what their tastes. I've had this book for a few years, and I just picked it back up recently. I felt I was able to appreciate this book all over again now this time, and I love reading over the checklists, which are not only fun, but seem right away to wash all doubt as to the character of each disorder or malady. I also think using the characters the way they did was brilliant, and something anyone could relate to, no matter what their tastes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew (M)

    Light and fun, this book is an interesting take on psychological disorders. There is nothing too surprising here, but it does suggest a new way to explain mental illness to people who might have a hard time understanding what these conditions "looks like". Light and fun, this book is an interesting take on psychological disorders. There is nothing too surprising here, but it does suggest a new way to explain mental illness to people who might have a hard time understanding what these conditions "looks like".

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary

    A light-hearted analysis of some of the characters in children's classics like Winnie the Pooh, Alice in Wonderland and the Wizard of Oz. Funny, and has some interesting (although very brief) descriptions of various mental disorders. A light-hearted analysis of some of the characters in children's classics like Winnie the Pooh, Alice in Wonderland and the Wizard of Oz. Funny, and has some interesting (although very brief) descriptions of various mental disorders.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Linsey Theunissen

    Meeeeeh.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    It's a fun read so long as you don't take it too seriously. Definitely not a scientific work, but no worse than any other pop-psychology. It's a fun read so long as you don't take it too seriously. Definitely not a scientific work, but no worse than any other pop-psychology.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lucy J Jeynes

    A humorous introduction to personality disorders. Fascinating.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    A very interesting read!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Raquel Dalcin

  16. 4 out of 5

    Petef

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carly

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kate Woodroffe

  19. 4 out of 5

    Richard Van wyk

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeniffer Bastos de Souza

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tania Contreras

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vania Nunes

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dani

  26. 4 out of 5

    Vix (Victoria Kenny)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  28. 5 out of 5

    Elvy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Idalmir de Araujo

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lea

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