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Revolution in Higher Education: How a Small Band of Innovators Will Make College Accessible and Affordable

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A report from the front lines of higher education and technology that chronicles efforts to transform teaching, learning, and opportunity. Colleges and universities have become increasingly costly, and, except for a handful of highly selective, elite institutions, unresponsive to twenty-first-century needs. But for the past few years, technology-fueled innovation has begun A report from the front lines of higher education and technology that chronicles efforts to transform teaching, learning, and opportunity. Colleges and universities have become increasingly costly, and, except for a handful of highly selective, elite institutions, unresponsive to twenty-first-century needs. But for the past few years, technology-fueled innovation has begun to transform higher education, introducing new ways to disseminate knowledge and better ways to learn--all at lower cost. In this impassioned account, Richard DeMillo tells the behind-the-scenes story of these pioneering efforts and offers a roadmap for transforming higher education. Building on his earlier book, Abelard to Apple, DeMillo argues that the current system of higher education is clearly unsustainable. Colleges and universities are in financial crisis. Tuition rises inexorably. Graduates of reputable schools often fail to learn basic skills, and many cannot find suitable jobs. Meanwhile, student-loan default rates have soared while the elite Ivy and near-Ivy schools seem remote and irrelevant. Where are the revolutionaries who can save higher education? DeMillo's heroes are a small band of innovators who are bringing the revolution in technology to colleges and universities. DeMillo chronicles, among other things, the invention of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) by professors at Stanford and MIT; Salman Khan's Khan Academy; the use of technology by struggling historically black colleges and universities to make learning more accessible; and the latest research on learning and the brain. He describes the revolution's goals and the entrenched hierarchical system it aims to overthrow; and he reframes the nature of the contract between society and its universities. The new institutions of a transformed higher education promise to demonstrate not only that education has value but also that it has values--virtues for the common good.


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A report from the front lines of higher education and technology that chronicles efforts to transform teaching, learning, and opportunity. Colleges and universities have become increasingly costly, and, except for a handful of highly selective, elite institutions, unresponsive to twenty-first-century needs. But for the past few years, technology-fueled innovation has begun A report from the front lines of higher education and technology that chronicles efforts to transform teaching, learning, and opportunity. Colleges and universities have become increasingly costly, and, except for a handful of highly selective, elite institutions, unresponsive to twenty-first-century needs. But for the past few years, technology-fueled innovation has begun to transform higher education, introducing new ways to disseminate knowledge and better ways to learn--all at lower cost. In this impassioned account, Richard DeMillo tells the behind-the-scenes story of these pioneering efforts and offers a roadmap for transforming higher education. Building on his earlier book, Abelard to Apple, DeMillo argues that the current system of higher education is clearly unsustainable. Colleges and universities are in financial crisis. Tuition rises inexorably. Graduates of reputable schools often fail to learn basic skills, and many cannot find suitable jobs. Meanwhile, student-loan default rates have soared while the elite Ivy and near-Ivy schools seem remote and irrelevant. Where are the revolutionaries who can save higher education? DeMillo's heroes are a small band of innovators who are bringing the revolution in technology to colleges and universities. DeMillo chronicles, among other things, the invention of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) by professors at Stanford and MIT; Salman Khan's Khan Academy; the use of technology by struggling historically black colleges and universities to make learning more accessible; and the latest research on learning and the brain. He describes the revolution's goals and the entrenched hierarchical system it aims to overthrow; and he reframes the nature of the contract between society and its universities. The new institutions of a transformed higher education promise to demonstrate not only that education has value but also that it has values--virtues for the common good.

30 review for Revolution in Higher Education: How a Small Band of Innovators Will Make College Accessible and Affordable

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I was trying to read this book along with a small group over on Bryan Alexander's blog but I got terribly behind. In my attempts to catch up on my own I decided I'm simply not interested in finishing. I don't believe Demillo is looking beyond the research university and the numbers, so it's a little outside of my context of liberal arts and non-tenured faculty work, where quality teaching has the higher value. I was forcing myself to read it, so that's a sign it's just time to move on! I was trying to read this book along with a small group over on Bryan Alexander's blog but I got terribly behind. In my attempts to catch up on my own I decided I'm simply not interested in finishing. I don't believe Demillo is looking beyond the research university and the numbers, so it's a little outside of my context of liberal arts and non-tenured faculty work, where quality teaching has the higher value. I was forcing myself to read it, so that's a sign it's just time to move on!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anita Fox

    Hey. Sometimes I like to relax and read books. There is something magical about it. I am a teacher in high school and work as a writer on the site. If you are worried about the exam, you are poorly prepared, or just want to tighten your knowledge. Of course, the best option would be to sit and prepare, but if you have little time or you have other priorities, you can visit this website. Our experts will do everything right. You can be sure. Hey. Sometimes I like to relax and read books. There is something magical about it. I am a teacher in high school and work as a writer on the site. If you are worried about the exam, you are poorly prepared, or just want to tighten your knowledge. Of course, the best option would be to sit and prepare, but if you have little time or you have other priorities, you can visit this website. Our experts will do everything right. You can be sure.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    This book will be of value to those that want to get a better sense of the kinds of innovative efforts that are underway in US higher education. What it doesn't provide is a critical analysis of these efforts. This book will be of value to those that want to get a better sense of the kinds of innovative efforts that are underway in US higher education. What it doesn't provide is a critical analysis of these efforts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    It's hard not to get reactionary about people who insist on being revolutionaries. Demillo's basic premise--online education, especially MOOCs, will change the educational landscape forever--is probably true, but he makes some mistakes that may result from his disciplinary background in computer science. First, he focuses a lot on content delivery and assumes that traditional university classes are large and impersonal lecture classes, which is a very different perspective to the liberal-arts fo It's hard not to get reactionary about people who insist on being revolutionaries. Demillo's basic premise--online education, especially MOOCs, will change the educational landscape forever--is probably true, but he makes some mistakes that may result from his disciplinary background in computer science. First, he focuses a lot on content delivery and assumes that traditional university classes are large and impersonal lecture classes, which is a very different perspective to the liberal-arts focus on small classes engaged with a mentor. Second, while he insists that MOOCs will provide widespread education to the masses for cheap, many of his examples are elitist by intent (Minerva, for example) or by instinct (students who lack self-management study skills will have a more difficult time with "self-directed learning"), Still, some very useful stuff--using large groups of diverse student tutors to review student work, importance of frequent formative feedback, etc. A lot of the minor arguments, like the major one, are compelling. But while online education is crucial for some people, and in some cases, there are many circumstances where the college experience--the club fair going on in front of me as I write, for example--will provide connections and educations you would never "self-direct." My two most educational experiences of my undergrad were (1) my honors thesis--self-directed, albeit closely mentored, learning and (2) participating in a comedy group and running what was essentially a small business. Getting a degree is important, but it isn't the only aim of an education; some kinds of learning thrive online, but not all.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Polly

    In the forward to this book, Ambassador Andrew J. Young stated that “Inequality cannot be wiped out as long as people cannot obtain a quality education." The author Robert DeMillo follows closely in developing this statement. He takes you on a journey that starts with MOOCs and the development of online learning, delves into the support of innovation and resistance to change by various universities, and explains more about the newest field of online learning technology than can be absorbed in on In the forward to this book, Ambassador Andrew J. Young stated that “Inequality cannot be wiped out as long as people cannot obtain a quality education." The author Robert DeMillo follows closely in developing this statement. He takes you on a journey that starts with MOOCs and the development of online learning, delves into the support of innovation and resistance to change by various universities, and explains more about the newest field of online learning technology than can be absorbed in one reading. He gives evidence that the traditional university education does not meet the needs of today's typical learner, and the costs of a university education are prohibitively expensive. Online learning provides the answer to society's need for affordable education. Like the introduction of computers into our everyday lives, online education parallels those ups and downs, but progress is inevitable. This book is well referenced well-researched and simply fascinating. Do not plan to race through it. The material requires reflection and thought. An entire class could be developed from this one book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brandon James

    The authors attempted to tie together a number of theories regarding the digitalization and futurization of the higher education industry, and I think they missed a significant part of the picture. The origins of higher education in the United States, regardless of which European nation we choose to model from, was based on character building and establishing a formative transition from childhood to adulthood. Regardless of what sector of higher education someone works in, the industry still mus The authors attempted to tie together a number of theories regarding the digitalization and futurization of the higher education industry, and I think they missed a significant part of the picture. The origins of higher education in the United States, regardless of which European nation we choose to model from, was based on character building and establishing a formative transition from childhood to adulthood. Regardless of what sector of higher education someone works in, the industry still must meet this need, as the psycho-social development of our kids continues to delay into their mid to late twenties. Additionally, I do not believe this book established a clear method for how the economics will be realized. Revolution in Higher Education must address pedagogy, economics and psycho-social development in order to present a holistic model that will be of use for our future society. Perhaps this book could have been called, "Revolution in how we can take classes after Secondary Education:..."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Edward Blake

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Llovet

  9. 5 out of 5

    Yuxi Liu

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tristan Denley

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Neill

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Allard

  13. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Hall

  14. 4 out of 5

    James Lovaas

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Demillo

  16. 5 out of 5

    Volo

  17. 5 out of 5

    Said Al-abri

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jsfowler2000

  19. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Scholl

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aja

  22. 4 out of 5

    Marcello

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Joyner

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark Hendrickson

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adrian van Eeden

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marlena R.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Reilly

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mike Truong

  30. 5 out of 5

    John

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