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The King in Yellow (Graphic Novel)

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It is whispered that there is a play that leaves only insanity and sorrow in its wake. It tempts those who read it, bringing upon them a vision of madness that should be left unseen... The stories herein traverse the elements of that play, and the words, themes and poetry, are permeated by the presence of the the King in Yellow, weaving together to leave upon the reader th It is whispered that there is a play that leaves only insanity and sorrow in its wake. It tempts those who read it, bringing upon them a vision of madness that should be left unseen... The stories herein traverse the elements of that play, and the words, themes and poetry, are permeated by the presence of the the King in Yellow, weaving together to leave upon the reader the ruinous impression of the Yellow Sign.


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It is whispered that there is a play that leaves only insanity and sorrow in its wake. It tempts those who read it, bringing upon them a vision of madness that should be left unseen... The stories herein traverse the elements of that play, and the words, themes and poetry, are permeated by the presence of the the King in Yellow, weaving together to leave upon the reader th It is whispered that there is a play that leaves only insanity and sorrow in its wake. It tempts those who read it, bringing upon them a vision of madness that should be left unseen... The stories herein traverse the elements of that play, and the words, themes and poetry, are permeated by the presence of the the King in Yellow, weaving together to leave upon the reader the ruinous impression of the Yellow Sign.

30 review for The King in Yellow (Graphic Novel)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is the last (that I know of) graphical representations of the world of HP Lovecraft by the publishers Self Made Hero (yes I know its not a Lovecraft as such as its Robert Chambers but it part of the Cthulhu mythos and is often cited in other mythos stories). As such this I think is the most ambitious and challenging story to depict in this medium since the story revolves around a book which is only fleetingly referred to and which by its very nature has its contents shown. As such it is mor This is the last (that I know of) graphical representations of the world of HP Lovecraft by the publishers Self Made Hero (yes I know its not a Lovecraft as such as its Robert Chambers but it part of the Cthulhu mythos and is often cited in other mythos stories). As such this I think is the most ambitious and challenging story to depict in this medium since the story revolves around a book which is only fleetingly referred to and which by its very nature has its contents shown. As such it is more in the readers mind (as well as the characters they are reading). So to depict almost a story within a story and which is not directly referred to is a true feat. Now I know this is all rather vague and my no spoilers rule (which I think I have come the closest to actually breaking for a long time) means that I am being intentionally abstruse about what is going on in this book means that really you have to read the story to understand it. What is more I think that you have to read the original first to really appreciate this version. Now I am not saying it is a good representation (because of course you cannot convert and convey every work in this book in to this graphical novel) it is more you get to appreciate what is not said and what is not show - which ironically is a central theme to the whole story in the first place. This I will admit is far from my best review but those who know this story know how tricky it is to pin down and having it retold in a different format and my poor attempts at trying not to give the game away make it all the more difficult. I think this is a true marvel at the creative team who brought this book in to being but I do not think it is my favourite from the series either. However as a series these books have been a real joy to read and I will be keeping a look out for more additions.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I discovered this comic while I finished reading Chambers's book. Culbard here adapts and illustrates the first four stories from the 1895 short story collection, “The King in Yellow” by Robert W. Chambers, linked by the idea of a play called with the same name, which drives anyone who reads it crazy. I found this transposition much more linear and the stories more coherent and interconnected, through some facts and characters that appear in many of them. Disturbing is the graphic representation I discovered this comic while I finished reading Chambers's book. Culbard here adapts and illustrates the first four stories from the 1895 short story collection, “The King in Yellow” by Robert W. Chambers, linked by the idea of a play called with the same name, which drives anyone who reads it crazy. I found this transposition much more linear and the stories more coherent and interconnected, through some facts and characters that appear in many of them. Disturbing is the graphic representation of the pale man without pupils who never speaks, but fills everyone who meets him with horror. The graphic adaptation is good and Culbard is able to masterfully capture the strangeness and restlessness of the original story, increased thanks to the effect that the images are able to convey. It is not the first graphic adaptation of Culbard from the classics that I read (for example The Case of Charles Dexter Ward: A Graphic Novel) and I am pleased to be able to recognize a work by him as a guarantee of a well done job.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    Culbard here adapts and illustrates the first four stories from the 1895 story collection The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers. As part of the adaptation, he makes the four stories more coherent and more interrelated, or so I'm told. Those four stories are already connected by the idea of a play called, you guessed it, "The King in Yellow", which will make you go insane if you read it. (If you think you are strong enough to survive, you can read the play itself which was reconstructed by Tho Culbard here adapts and illustrates the first four stories from the 1895 story collection The King in Yellow by Robert W. Chambers. As part of the adaptation, he makes the four stories more coherent and more interrelated, or so I'm told. Those four stories are already connected by the idea of a play called, you guessed it, "The King in Yellow", which will make you go insane if you read it. (If you think you are strong enough to survive, you can read the play itself which was reconstructed by Thom Ryng as The King In Yellow.) The stories are OK but not great. The graphic adaptation is pretty good. One character who answers many questions with a silent, pupil-less stare is particularly creepy. One loose thread that bothered me is that at the start of the first story they introduce the idea of a publicly-available suicide room. That idea is introduced, but then doesn't affect the stories in any way. Apparently HPL and later authors mixed components from this into the Cthulu mythos.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    Beautiful adaptations of haunting stories. It's a shame they weren't all here. Beautiful adaptations of haunting stories. It's a shame they weren't all here.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Derek Royal

    What Richard Corben is to Edgar Allan Poe comics adaptations, Ian Culbard is to H.P. Lovecraft (and Lovecraftian) comics adaptations. And even though this isn't Lovecraft, it's definitely the kind of narrative that would (and did) resonate with the horror writer. Culbard takes the first four stories in Chambers's 1895 collection and adapts them into comics form. And arguably, he makes those four "King in Yellow" stories more cohesive, doing Chambers a service. What Culbard has done, in essence, What Richard Corben is to Edgar Allan Poe comics adaptations, Ian Culbard is to H.P. Lovecraft (and Lovecraftian) comics adaptations. And even though this isn't Lovecraft, it's definitely the kind of narrative that would (and did) resonate with the horror writer. Culbard takes the first four stories in Chambers's 1895 collection and adapts them into comics form. And arguably, he makes those four "King in Yellow" stories more cohesive, doing Chambers a service. What Culbard has done, in essence, is to create a comics short-story cycle -- or what I've called elsewhere a "graphic cycle" -- that can easily stand on its own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Driscoll

    I don't usually read graphic books, so don't have much to compare this book with. I did recently re-read the original stories by Chambers and found this to be a worthy rendition of the first four King in Yellow tales. Culbard has a single character (Jack Scott) appear in all four of his episodes, tying them together into a single narrative. The pupil-less eyes are disturbing but effective. I didn't care for the prison bar effect of many-paned windows in some of the interior scenes. Wordless sequ I don't usually read graphic books, so don't have much to compare this book with. I did recently re-read the original stories by Chambers and found this to be a worthy rendition of the first four King in Yellow tales. Culbard has a single character (Jack Scott) appear in all four of his episodes, tying them together into a single narrative. The pupil-less eyes are disturbing but effective. I didn't care for the prison bar effect of many-paned windows in some of the interior scenes. Wordless sequences showing the passage of time are well done. I suspect those who are already acquainted with the stories by Chambers would get more out of this book than readers previously unacquainted with the Tattered King.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Herman

    Great adaptation of a classic Am I going insane after reading this book? By Hastur, I hope not. All I can say is that it is good. Great, even. The novel itself (which is more a series of interlinked stories) is an uncontested masterpiece, but this Graphic Novel adaptation by I.N.J Culbard is just as compelling. Much like the original text, this comic freaked me out with its creepy art and excellent pacing that make the moments the horrors come for you shine with a frightening luster. Highly recom Great adaptation of a classic Am I going insane after reading this book? By Hastur, I hope not. All I can say is that it is good. Great, even. The novel itself (which is more a series of interlinked stories) is an uncontested masterpiece, but this Graphic Novel adaptation by I.N.J Culbard is just as compelling. Much like the original text, this comic freaked me out with its creepy art and excellent pacing that make the moments the horrors come for you shine with a frightening luster. Highly recommended indeed!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Edward Taylor

    A beautiful illustrated adaptation of Chambers’ best known works. The rich colours, the dark subject matter and the dreamy dread that is bound to these pages is not something to miss. Have you found the yellow sign?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Fiona MacDonald

    Very bizarre story "The King in Yellow" is - this graphic novel is beautifully done, but the story was too confusing to me and so I can't award it very highly. I've got the book somewhere on my shelves but I'm not sure if I'm convinced that I want to pick it up now...Graphics wise it scores full marks though so I've moved my rating to a 4! Very bizarre story "The King in Yellow" is - this graphic novel is beautifully done, but the story was too confusing to me and so I can't award it very highly. I've got the book somewhere on my shelves but I'm not sure if I'm convinced that I want to pick it up now...Graphics wise it scores full marks though so I've moved my rating to a 4!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marc Bagué

    Culbard always delivers. A delight of a reading and a shudder to remember. I can't think of a better tribute to the classic. Culbard always delivers. A delight of a reading and a shudder to remember. I can't think of a better tribute to the classic.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Corinna Bechko

    It has been quite a while since I read the original stories this comic adaptation is based upon, but Culbard does a good job of capturing the pure strangeness of those tales in a way that reminded me why they had made such an impression on me in the first place. The cycle is built around mystery, something words can do well but images are sometimes less good at conveying. Here enough is held back for that aspect to be retained, a delicate balance indeed. And for those who only know about Carcosa It has been quite a while since I read the original stories this comic adaptation is based upon, but Culbard does a good job of capturing the pure strangeness of those tales in a way that reminded me why they had made such an impression on me in the first place. The cycle is built around mystery, something words can do well but images are sometimes less good at conveying. Here enough is held back for that aspect to be retained, a delicate balance indeed. And for those who only know about Carcosa and the King in Yellow from the first season of True Detective, you'll soon find that these things have very little in common.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Redsteve

    I'm up in the air on this graphic adaptation of Chambers' classic of supernatural horror. I felt it was well done... enough, and the artwork was disturbing... but... There's nothing specific that I can complain about, but this one didn't do much for me. I'd say 4 stars for quality; 2 stars for enjoyment. EDIT (1/9/22). I'm still giving it three stars, but a solid three rather than my rather ambivalent score from previously. Having now read Chambers actual book, I know understand Culbard's editori I'm up in the air on this graphic adaptation of Chambers' classic of supernatural horror. I felt it was well done... enough, and the artwork was disturbing... but... There's nothing specific that I can complain about, but this one didn't do much for me. I'd say 4 stars for quality; 2 stars for enjoyment. EDIT (1/9/22). I'm still giving it three stars, but a solid three rather than my rather ambivalent score from previously. Having now read Chambers actual book, I know understand Culbard's editorial choices (This version does not include all of the stories in the author's original collection) and appreciate the art better.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sardonyx

    I loved this. The artwork is amazing! Dude knows how to draw people on the verge of crazy. Those manic eyes... Now I have to go out and read the original source material!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emma Darcy

    not what I expected- I could have given it four stars if I had liked the art better.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kenny

    A worthy adaptation. Not as creepy as the book but still shit-inducing scary in its own visual way.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Skjam!

    The King in Yellow was a book containing linked short stories by Robert W. Chambers. Within these stories, “The King in Yellow” is a play bound in book format, the full details of which are never disclosed. It’s said to be brilliantly written, but deeply disturbing; just reading it is enough to send fragile minds over the brink, and actually producing the play is…not recommended. And yet the book keeps popping up on people’s bookshelves, even if they are sure they never purchased it. The antholog The King in Yellow was a book containing linked short stories by Robert W. Chambers. Within these stories, “The King in Yellow” is a play bound in book format, the full details of which are never disclosed. It’s said to be brilliantly written, but deeply disturbing; just reading it is enough to send fragile minds over the brink, and actually producing the play is…not recommended. And yet the book keeps popping up on people’s bookshelves, even if they are sure they never purchased it. The anthology strongly influenced H.P. Lovecraft, especially the idea of books that could influence their readers to madness, and the King in Yellow was absorbed into the Cthulhu Mythos. (Hilariously, this edition makes the error of crediting Lovecraft as the original author on the indicia page, but nowhere else.) This adaptation illustrates four of the stories. “The Repairer of Reputations” begins in the near-future year of 1920, and things are looking up. The Winthrop administration led America to victory over Germany in the Samoan War, Chicago has been fully rebuilt after the second Great Fire, efficient, clean subways have replaced noisy, ugly elevated trains, and suicide has been made legal, with Lethal Chambers in every town and city. (Wait, what?) But not everyone is happy. Hildred Castaigne has discovered that he is, in fact, the rightful ruler of the Americas, with only his cousin Louis as a possible contender. His secret campaign to take over is supported by the title character, a Mr. Wilde. Mr. Wilde’s day job is fixing people’s reputations so that they can then return to polite society; he accomplishes this by having a network of agents he has blackmail material on, who then get him more blackmail material on more people who then fall under his power. With leverage on the right people, he can get the media and rumor mills to exonerate or destroy anyone he pleases. However, a certain amount of what Hildred Castaigne tells us may not be strictly fact. It seems that he suffered a head injury some years back and was confined for a while, and also he’s read “The King in Yellow” and thinks it has coded messages just for him. His imperial crown, kept in a safe, might be a crude art project kept in a cardboard box. Also, the entire takeover plot hinges on Mr. Wilde’s network, and when his abused cat decides it’s had quite enough…. “The Mask” takes place in Paris. A painter named Boris has developed a fluid that transforms any living object dunked in it into marble. His friend Alec is simultaneously fascinated and terrified by this. Alec’s also got a love triangle thing going on with Boris’ wife Genevieve. To the reader’s utter lack of surprise, there’s a horrific OSHA violation, but maybe it’s not a complete tragedy? “The Yellow Sign” takes us back to New York, where painter Mr. Scott and his model/love interest have nightmares about the night watchman at the church next door. In the dreams, he drives a hearse, and one of them is inside the coffin. The night watchman might not be, strictly speaking, human based on testimony from a man who assaulted the creepy fellow. “In the Court of the Dragon” is presented here as possibly a nightmare; Mr. Scott finds himself living in Paris, where he attends a church service. Only he notices that the organist is not a normal human being and that the music has unsettling undertones. When he leaves the church, the protagonist finds himself repeatedly coming across the organist, and in a perhaps hallucinatory finale, meets the King in Yellow itself. The art is well-suited to the weird, somewhat dated material. I want to especially commend the coloring, as especially shades of yellow are an important theme in the stories. Where this adaptation falls down a bit is that some of the exposition has been omitted, making what’s going on even harder to figure out than in the original. Content note: suicide, animal abuse, female nudity. The treatment of insanity is period, and may be uncomfortable for modern readers. I do recommend this to fans of weird fiction, particularly in the Lovecraftian vein, but for best effect you should also read the original book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zare

    This is adaptation of famous horror stories centered around mysterious play "The King in Yellow". This play (book) is a center piece around which we follow the megalomaniac aiming for control of America, obsessed sculptor that goes crazy and young artist that seems to be constantly pushed to that final step toward the final mystery of this King in Yellow. While at the same time something weird is happening with the society at large as very disturbing lethal chambers are popping out across cites This is adaptation of famous horror stories centered around mysterious play "The King in Yellow". This play (book) is a center piece around which we follow the megalomaniac aiming for control of America, obsessed sculptor that goes crazy and young artist that seems to be constantly pushed to that final step toward the final mystery of this King in Yellow. While at the same time something weird is happening with the society at large as very disturbing lethal chambers are popping out across cites and depression and suicide seem to be rampant. I have to admit I did not read the original novel and came across character's name in W40K novel and a story arc called Providence based on Lovecraft's works. While former is set to the far future where terrors unlike those from Lovecraft mythos roam the space and prey on Humanity, latter aimed only at the pure shock, nothing else, they had this mysterious creature as a common element - King in Yellow, destroying the minds of man and condemning them to terror and lunacy. So imagine my surprise when I found out that King in Yellow was a book on itself. Art is excellent (as seems to be the trademark of Cullbard's books) and it depicts in very interesting way psychological state of the characters and ever present, almost palpable, doom and mystery of this horrific book that destroys the mind of anyone who reads it. Highly recommended to all fans of horror.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lynsey Walker

    Further we wander along the dark and winding road in a quest to find all the beautiful, beautiful, weird fiction gems out there. Mr Culbard illustrates these gems ever so well. More comic (sorry I’m not on board with the term ‘graphic novel’, it’s a fucking comic) retellings of classic cosmic horror as I like to be able to see my cosmic horror in it’s full cosmicly horrory glory. Which I know if kind of against the point but I regret nothing. I enjoyed this interpretation as it linked all the sto Further we wander along the dark and winding road in a quest to find all the beautiful, beautiful, weird fiction gems out there. Mr Culbard illustrates these gems ever so well. More comic (sorry I’m not on board with the term ‘graphic novel’, it’s a fucking comic) retellings of classic cosmic horror as I like to be able to see my cosmic horror in it’s full cosmicly horrory glory. Which I know if kind of against the point but I regret nothing. I enjoyed this interpretation as it linked all the stories together in a thread that made it all make a lot more sense, was this in the original story, no, do I still like it, yes. It did take some liberties with the source material but not, in my opinion, to the detriment of it... it still read as the original stories as much as turning them into a comic can do. Splendid cosmic horror fun. Now I’m off to track down a copy of the play so I can go insane and kill myself. #goals

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Bieniek

    Interesting adaptation of the classic horror story, actually a series of connected short stories. I started reading this, then stopped and sought out the original stories before finishing the graphic novel, and I think I liked this better. The artwork did a good job of conveying the weird nature of the stories that were a little challenging to read due to the late-19th century style it was written in, and it tied the stories together in a way that I didn't get when reading the original prose. Th Interesting adaptation of the classic horror story, actually a series of connected short stories. I started reading this, then stopped and sought out the original stories before finishing the graphic novel, and I think I liked this better. The artwork did a good job of conveying the weird nature of the stories that were a little challenging to read due to the late-19th century style it was written in, and it tied the stories together in a way that I didn't get when reading the original prose. The fact that he omitted the second set of stories of the original book, which didn't really have anything to do with the King In Yellow anyway, was a bonus in my mind.

  20. 5 out of 5

    A.M.

    A graphic novel version of the first four stories from The King In Yellow. The Repairer of Reputations, The mask, The yellow sign, In the Court of the dragon, Kid 1 volunteers at the library and told me it was there. “What? You didn’t borrow it?!” Guess where I went the next day? It’s pretty hard to make something so lyrically beautiful into something graphically beautiful, but they’ve done it. There are also some small changes made, the same people appearing in later stories, to tie it together a littl A graphic novel version of the first four stories from The King In Yellow. The Repairer of Reputations, The mask, The yellow sign, In the Court of the dragon, Kid 1 volunteers at the library and told me it was there. “What? You didn’t borrow it?!” Guess where I went the next day? It’s pretty hard to make something so lyrically beautiful into something graphically beautiful, but they’ve done it. There are also some small changes made, the same people appearing in later stories, to tie it together a little better. The original is a mind warping mishmash of ideas and images. I read it before I went to sleep, and sadly did not dream of the towers of Carcosa. 4 stars

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This adaptation actually manages to elevate the source material by creating stronger ties between the stories then the loose connection of The King in Yellow book that Chambers uses. Keep in mind this is not a complete adaptation of all the stories in the original, just a handful that have to do with the Yellow King/Sign mythos. As usual, Culbard creates manages to illustrate the written word with simple yet carefully framed images that are usually spot on, proving a great grasp of not just the This adaptation actually manages to elevate the source material by creating stronger ties between the stories then the loose connection of The King in Yellow book that Chambers uses. Keep in mind this is not a complete adaptation of all the stories in the original, just a handful that have to do with the Yellow King/Sign mythos. As usual, Culbard creates manages to illustrate the written word with simple yet carefully framed images that are usually spot on, proving a great grasp of not just the direct source but its peripheral mythology.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    This is the graphic novel version of The King in Yellow, a series of short horror stories about a fictional play that if you read it you become insane. It was basically the first to introduce the idea of the off-screen horror, implied but unseen, and was a huge influence on Lovecraft among others. This graphic novel version is a good way to get the gist of this important work without wading through the old-timey prose. The first season of True Detective had a number of references to The King in This is the graphic novel version of The King in Yellow, a series of short horror stories about a fictional play that if you read it you become insane. It was basically the first to introduce the idea of the off-screen horror, implied but unseen, and was a huge influence on Lovecraft among others. This graphic novel version is a good way to get the gist of this important work without wading through the old-timey prose. The first season of True Detective had a number of references to The King in Yellow - it shows up in a lot of places and was an important work.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ben Woodhouse

    Firstly, the book on which this is based is great. It's the clear (and perhaps better written?) predecessor to Lovecraft's eldritch horror. And this graphic novel does capture some of that feeling - the unknowable things which lurk in the shadows, twisting and turning man to madness. But it loses something along the way, maybe by the very nature of being visual? Removing the imagination aspect of the fear? The imagery of the artists didn't quite match the terrifying or twisted version I had in m Firstly, the book on which this is based is great. It's the clear (and perhaps better written?) predecessor to Lovecraft's eldritch horror. And this graphic novel does capture some of that feeling - the unknowable things which lurk in the shadows, twisting and turning man to madness. But it loses something along the way, maybe by the very nature of being visual? Removing the imagination aspect of the fear? The imagery of the artists didn't quite match the terrifying or twisted version I had in my head. Solid enough, yeah I guess so, but nothing amazing.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Adele

    Beautiful and richly illustrated by I.N.J. Culbard. The classic Gothic horror asthestic is wonderful. I could easily imagine it as a British horror movie from the 50s or 60s. The Haunting (1963) just kept coming to mind as I read this, even though there are no similarities in plot. The plot of this is quite interesting. A book that spreads madness or is it the mad drawn to that book? Death follows the book...or does it? It drew me in and kept my attention, so well done!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    The best of these so far, because Culbard is *great* with grotesques (and boy are there a lot of them here) and because the nature of the story, that strange elliptical and shifting weirdness, really works well with images that are full of callbacks and clever use of space. We start one story in a room with narrow window frames, that is clearly ambiguously linked to a prison cell, and it’s that deft subtlety that makes these books so special. Excellent

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave Morris

    I've had the original book since I was a teenager, but so far haven't been able to get more than a few pages into it. Culbard's version goes down a lot easier, but it still feels as though the book's significance is as a stepping-stone between Poe and Lovecraft rather than as a work in its own right. I've had the original book since I was a teenager, but so far haven't been able to get more than a few pages into it. Culbard's version goes down a lot easier, but it still feels as though the book's significance is as a stepping-stone between Poe and Lovecraft rather than as a work in its own right.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Felyn

    I'm going to have to find the original short story, because I have no idea what happened in the final section. The first two were easily enough understood, but the last... I don't get it. I found the art repetitive, lots of panels with no text and only wide, staring faces. It seems to me this is perhaps a story that should not have been adapted as too much was lost. I'm going to have to find the original short story, because I have no idea what happened in the final section. The first two were easily enough understood, but the last... I don't get it. I found the art repetitive, lots of panels with no text and only wide, staring faces. It seems to me this is perhaps a story that should not have been adapted as too much was lost.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    A decent adaptation of the classic and very weird origin work. I don't know if Culbard's art style is the perfect choice for Chambers' stories, but I can't really say what would be better, either. He ties the tales together in a comprehendable way and gives an appropriately 'cosmic horror' ending to the vague storyline. A decent adaptation of the classic and very weird origin work. I don't know if Culbard's art style is the perfect choice for Chambers' stories, but I can't really say what would be better, either. He ties the tales together in a comprehendable way and gives an appropriately 'cosmic horror' ending to the vague storyline.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tanwen Cooper

    An alright graphic novel, but mostly interesting because of the role it plays in the wider mythos. I liked the start which was several individual stories linked together by a copy of The King in Yellow, with hints of a greater mystery. However, the pay off of this greater mystery fell a bit flat for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey Riggs

    Some of the stories don't mesh together like i assume they do in the original text. However, you can see the thin line that carries through - literally the same copy of the King in Yellow. It wasn't really a horror story to me, but i will admit to having more nightmares after reading this book. The content doesn't carry over, but did the book bring them out anyway? I will never know... Some of the stories don't mesh together like i assume they do in the original text. However, you can see the thin line that carries through - literally the same copy of the King in Yellow. It wasn't really a horror story to me, but i will admit to having more nightmares after reading this book. The content doesn't carry over, but did the book bring them out anyway? I will never know...

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