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Raising Men: Lessons Navy SEALs Learned from Their Training and Taught to Their Sons

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After Eric Davis spent over 16 years in the military, including a decade in the SEAL Teams, his family was more than used to his absence on deployments and secret missions that could obscure his whereabouts for months at a time. Without a father figure in his own life since the age of fifteen, Eric was desperate to maintain the bonds he’d fought so hard to forge when his ch After Eric Davis spent over 16 years in the military, including a decade in the SEAL Teams, his family was more than used to his absence on deployments and secret missions that could obscure his whereabouts for months at a time. Without a father figure in his own life since the age of fifteen, Eric was desperate to maintain the bonds he’d fought so hard to forge when his children were young—particularly with his son, Jason, because he knew how difficult it was to face the challenge of becoming a man on one’s own. Unfortunately, Eric learned the hard way that Quality Time doesn’t always show up in Quantity Time. Facebook, television, phones, video games, school, jobs, friends—they all got in the way of a real, meaningful father-son relationship. It was time to take action. As a SEAL, Eric learned to innovate and push boundaries, allowing him to function at levels beyond what was expected, comfortable, ordinary, and even imaginable, and he knew that as a father he needed to do the same with his son. Meeting extreme with extreme was the only answer. Using a unique blend of discipline, leadership, adventure, and grace, Eric and his SEAL brothers will teach you how to connect, and reconnect, with your sons and learn how to raise real men—the Navy SEAL way.


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After Eric Davis spent over 16 years in the military, including a decade in the SEAL Teams, his family was more than used to his absence on deployments and secret missions that could obscure his whereabouts for months at a time. Without a father figure in his own life since the age of fifteen, Eric was desperate to maintain the bonds he’d fought so hard to forge when his ch After Eric Davis spent over 16 years in the military, including a decade in the SEAL Teams, his family was more than used to his absence on deployments and secret missions that could obscure his whereabouts for months at a time. Without a father figure in his own life since the age of fifteen, Eric was desperate to maintain the bonds he’d fought so hard to forge when his children were young—particularly with his son, Jason, because he knew how difficult it was to face the challenge of becoming a man on one’s own. Unfortunately, Eric learned the hard way that Quality Time doesn’t always show up in Quantity Time. Facebook, television, phones, video games, school, jobs, friends—they all got in the way of a real, meaningful father-son relationship. It was time to take action. As a SEAL, Eric learned to innovate and push boundaries, allowing him to function at levels beyond what was expected, comfortable, ordinary, and even imaginable, and he knew that as a father he needed to do the same with his son. Meeting extreme with extreme was the only answer. Using a unique blend of discipline, leadership, adventure, and grace, Eric and his SEAL brothers will teach you how to connect, and reconnect, with your sons and learn how to raise real men—the Navy SEAL way.

30 review for Raising Men: Lessons Navy SEALs Learned from Their Training and Taught to Their Sons

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eric Davis

    I'm clearly biased since I wrote the book, but it is my hope that anyone who reads it will benefit from the SEAL performance principles I used within it. I wrote this for anyone looking to live a life beyond their current situation. Whether you're a father or not this book was designed to be of value and use. I'm clearly biased since I wrote the book, but it is my hope that anyone who reads it will benefit from the SEAL performance principles I used within it. I wrote this for anyone looking to live a life beyond their current situation. Whether you're a father or not this book was designed to be of value and use.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Bayles

    I wouldn't normally read a book on parenting, but it was being featured at the library, and sounded like an interesting premise. As Mr. Davis says in the beginning, he chose to target sons for the book, but all his advice also pertains to how he raises his daughters. That being said, I would go further and say this book is an excellent resource for how we raise ourselves. An adult will get plenty out of this about being a good, decent, effective human. I generally like most of the material put ou I wouldn't normally read a book on parenting, but it was being featured at the library, and sounded like an interesting premise. As Mr. Davis says in the beginning, he chose to target sons for the book, but all his advice also pertains to how he raises his daughters. That being said, I would go further and say this book is an excellent resource for how we raise ourselves. An adult will get plenty out of this about being a good, decent, effective human. I generally like most of the material put out there by the special forces community. It's a great improvement over the previous generation, which seemed to be long on bluster and short on anything else. What differentiates this book is that it's quite specific in detail, and has a solid mix of theory and practice. There are plenty of stories about SEAL life, but it's primarily an operations manual of sorts. Mr. Davis does a great job. I'll be buying his next book in hardcover, whatever the topic.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Suzanna

    LOVED this book! I will highly recommend this book to any person living, haha. Geared specifically towards fathers of boys, it's still such a good book for parents to read, and for people who live in the world to read. Filled with all kinds of good advice and suggestions on being a confident, contributing member of society, as you raise your children from birth to adulthood, and as you walk the paths of life alongside your children as they grow older. Don't have children? Still a great read as i LOVED this book! I will highly recommend this book to any person living, haha. Geared specifically towards fathers of boys, it's still such a good book for parents to read, and for people who live in the world to read. Filled with all kinds of good advice and suggestions on being a confident, contributing member of society, as you raise your children from birth to adulthood, and as you walk the paths of life alongside your children as they grow older. Don't have children? Still a great read as it encourages taking risks, knowing boundaries, and setting goals.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gene

    Cruised through this one on audiobook. I wanted to give it three stars. Contents of the book were good but the narrator made it sound like he was trying to be macho. Given that the narrator didn’t write the book and that I enjoyed the premise, I stuck with the four stars. There isn’t anything profound in this book but the way the author relates his training to parenthood is a neat perspective. Certainly some interesting points made. If you have kids, I’d encourage you to read if anything, to mak Cruised through this one on audiobook. I wanted to give it three stars. Contents of the book were good but the narrator made it sound like he was trying to be macho. Given that the narrator didn’t write the book and that I enjoyed the premise, I stuck with the four stars. There isn’t anything profound in this book but the way the author relates his training to parenthood is a neat perspective. Certainly some interesting points made. If you have kids, I’d encourage you to read if anything, to make you think about how your current parenting decisions are made.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Eric Davis directs his book toward fathers raising sons, but it really is about parenthood and he says that he uses the same principles in raising his three daughters as he does with his son. As a mom, I benefited greatly from the book and look forward to my husband reading this so that we can talk about what we learned from it. He does a great job of mixing in stories of his SEAL Training with stories related to fatherhood. The lessons are great and it was definitely a good kick in the pants for Eric Davis directs his book toward fathers raising sons, but it really is about parenthood and he says that he uses the same principles in raising his three daughters as he does with his son. As a mom, I benefited greatly from the book and look forward to my husband reading this so that we can talk about what we learned from it. He does a great job of mixing in stories of his SEAL Training with stories related to fatherhood. The lessons are great and it was definitely a good kick in the pants for me. Two points that were most helpful for me: Lead from the Front - I can't expect to raise my kids to be something that I am not; so be the person you want them to become. Mind over Matter - If I have a vision for what I am trying to build in my kids, I can do anything to accomplish that vision and it's worth it. Keep that vision in front of you and you'll be able to push through whatever obstacles and you'll drop the stuff that doesn't matter Keep in mind, he's a SEAL, so there's language in there that comes with that territory, but it's limited and generally appropriate to the situation described. Well worth the read!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Maxim Sinitsyn

    There was some good advice in the book, but it's 80% about guy's experience in the SEAL Teams and only 20% about parenting. Listened as an audiobook, but rating as paper - audiobook would get 1 just because the guy reading it is unbearable (unless you are a seal or you were raised by Eric Davis himself and nothing is unbearable, just an inconvenience). There was some good advice in the book, but it's 80% about guy's experience in the SEAL Teams and only 20% about parenting. Listened as an audiobook, but rating as paper - audiobook would get 1 just because the guy reading it is unbearable (unless you are a seal or you were raised by Eric Davis himself and nothing is unbearable, just an inconvenience).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    An interesting spin on taking the lessons learned by Navy SEALs in their training and experience and incorporating them into the serious and important work of raising sons. There was too much salty-sailor language for me, but a few insights are below: - Don't say, "Wow, you are really good at that!" Instead, say, "Wow, it's great that you worked so hard at that!" Therefore, the focus is on the effort, not on the personal identification of being good at something. Celebrate the triumph over the st An interesting spin on taking the lessons learned by Navy SEALs in their training and experience and incorporating them into the serious and important work of raising sons. There was too much salty-sailor language for me, but a few insights are below: - Don't say, "Wow, you are really good at that!" Instead, say, "Wow, it's great that you worked so hard at that!" Therefore, the focus is on the effort, not on the personal identification of being good at something. Celebrate the triumph over the struggle, not the specific end result or being naturally good at something. Without those language distinctions, the child may learn that if something is hard, it's not worth doing, where the opposite is true. The idea is to instill the thought, "the harder I work, the better I get." (Ch. 7) - When you are in constant forward motion and have continuous growth, you feel as if there is nothing you can't do. Every obstacle becomes an opportunity. If we're not improving every day, we lose our confidence regarding improvement. (Ch. 8) - Spend time doing what your kids like to do. (Ch. 8) - A friend who played in the NHL said that there are plenty of players better than him in the NHL, but many of them are simply not nice guys and thus no one wanted to work or play with them. Scouts knew this, and those players never got picked up to play pro hockey. The same applies to life and parenthood: show up and earn your "Trident" every day. (Ch. 8)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Batmangoodwin

    Easy read. What I liked most about this book is Eric’s ability to translate his SEAL training to real life challenges while also clearly communicating a nurturing approach that doesn’t give the impression of an inflexible, militaristic home life. If you can’t take rough language, don’t read books by SEALs. Or maybe do read books by SEALs and just get over it. If you’re a father, of either boys or girls, you’ll be glad you checked out this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    C.J. Omoth

    Some excellent ideas is this one. Debrief questions between chapters to help you really think, relate and implement are tremendously useful. Definitely worth the read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lynnae

    I really enjoyed this book! Though it's specifically geared toward fathers raising their sons, there are principles in there that can apply to everyone, both personally and as parents, leaders, or role models. Since I've been on a spree of reading books written by SEALs, I've gotten used to the way their training and experience gives them an air of arrogance, but in this book, Eric Davis actually explains very simply the difference between confidence and arrogance, and he comes off as genuinely c I really enjoyed this book! Though it's specifically geared toward fathers raising their sons, there are principles in there that can apply to everyone, both personally and as parents, leaders, or role models. Since I've been on a spree of reading books written by SEALs, I've gotten used to the way their training and experience gives them an air of arrogance, but in this book, Eric Davis actually explains very simply the difference between confidence and arrogance, and he comes off as genuinely confident without being arrogant. He's capable and qualified to give the kinds of advice he gives. An unforeseen result of reading a book like this, in particular, is that it's a great read for the potential (or current) military spouse who might be afraid of how the military lifestyle could affect their children. It highlights the positives of having a military parent, and Eric's love for and devotion to his children is remarkable (and therefore reassuring). Content warning: It's very swear-y for a "parenting book." While not surprising, given the author, be forewarned if you're sensitive to that kind of thing. F-bombs aplenty.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    "Raising Men" is a principle based book that uses lessons from the Navy Seals and tries to apply them to your parenting challenges. Overall, i found this approach both entertaining and helpful. Comparing life to war maybe a bit of a stretch for some, but i find it extremely helpful as there are many, many pitfalls that life presents that can and will short circuit the development of our children. I was pleasantly surprised by the approach of the book. The title suggests a very male macho type ap "Raising Men" is a principle based book that uses lessons from the Navy Seals and tries to apply them to your parenting challenges. Overall, i found this approach both entertaining and helpful. Comparing life to war maybe a bit of a stretch for some, but i find it extremely helpful as there are many, many pitfalls that life presents that can and will short circuit the development of our children. I was pleasantly surprised by the approach of the book. The title suggests a very male macho type approach that is for 'men only'... but i think most of this book can apply to raising all children. If you're looking for 'silver bullet' parent tips that try to solve it all, i think you need to look elsewhere. The author provides general principles of Navy Seal training and applies them to child rearing. He doesn't provide a proscriptive 'checklist' approach, but grounds you in life lessons the Seals teach you that we can apply to every part of our life. I found this approach refreshing and informative. The most helpful approaches for me were: (A) Building a team, (B) Don't be right, be effective, (C) Get off your Ass, and (D) Taking back what is mine. Building a team is foundational and the author actually comes from a divorced background. His message about putting the kids first no matter what your situation and then building effective communication with your spouse, ex-wife and kids is essential. This message is critical and i personally find that anything my wife and I accomplish is really because we have made a commitment to be together on our child raising. My guess is that most ineffective child rearing stands and falls based on this approach alone. When we send mixed messages to our kids and we aren't 'together' on how to raise, it fundamentally confuses anything you want to accomplish. "Don't be right, be effective" is a rally to focus on what 'works' vs. thinking you are the expert on everything. This can be problematic for some men as they want to be viewed as the 'head of the house' but often we don't have the faintest clue of what really works. This is a call to humility to learn from others and back to effectively communicating as a team to get things done. Mr. Davis also warns us to let children take the consequences of their own actions. He encourages parents to ensure we let our kids see the real outcomes of actions so they can see how their choices impact their outcomes. We won't always be there for them and we aren't doing them any favors by letting them avoid these consequences. Finally the lessons of 'Getting off your ass' to 'Taking back what is mine' are helpful calls to build real relationship with your children. While the intensity of parenting will wear off after 18, the author encourages you to build life experiences in the outdoors as a way of making memories. And then he encourages you to find common elements with your son so you can find areas to be friends for life. Now that my son is a teenager... i find this to be the area i need to focus on. I think i need to plan some fishing and hiking trips. The memories and bonding will build that foundation for being a mentor well into his later years. Well done Mr. Davis! Hooyah!

  12. 5 out of 5

    TexJ3

    Best parenting book on the market, not just for men From start to finish, Eric Davis provides clear examples of how to improve upon family relationships while being funny, insightful and realistic. This is a parenting book that everyone should read. As a mother of three, I appreciate the way in which each idea is set forth and not only includes young men, but also daughters. Each section had me considering in a positive manner ways that our family will benefit from the chapter. Unlike other pare Best parenting book on the market, not just for men From start to finish, Eric Davis provides clear examples of how to improve upon family relationships while being funny, insightful and realistic. This is a parenting book that everyone should read. As a mother of three, I appreciate the way in which each idea is set forth and not only includes young men, but also daughters. Each section had me considering in a positive manner ways that our family will benefit from the chapter. Unlike other parenting books that can be dry and frankly condescending in their perfection, the use of multiple teammates, personal stories, and his own successes and at times failures made this a book that anyone can relate to and want to read. This isn't your mom's parenting book! I truly hope that there will be additional books from this author on the horizon. The life lessons herein are applicable to far beyond dads. I recommend this to all moms as well.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Arvind Kandhare

    Highly recommended to all the parents who want to raise kick ass kids. Not only will this approach raise seal pups but also might help in reducing your own gut and add some more years to your life. But finally it is too much work :). For me not worth the years it will add or gut it will drop. But this book is also strewn with some real good thoughts and tricks. Especially I really loved the bit about teaching kids to step back from a fight. That was pretty refreshing. But finally the book will real Highly recommended to all the parents who want to raise kick ass kids. Not only will this approach raise seal pups but also might help in reducing your own gut and add some more years to your life. But finally it is too much work :). For me not worth the years it will add or gut it will drop. But this book is also strewn with some real good thoughts and tricks. Especially I really loved the bit about teaching kids to step back from a fight. That was pretty refreshing. But finally the book will really leave you thinking about a lot of things you could have done with your kids. For all the despairing parents out there - here are some more things you could have done with your kids but you are not :D

  14. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    This is such a great book! Thank you Eric Davis for passing on your knowledge and experiences in being the ultimate parent/father! I wish this book would have came back out in 1998 when my son was born. Although my son is in college now, after what I just read, I now have renewed sense of motivation of elevating my parenting skills after all these years. I definitely recommend this book not because I have admired the SEALs since I was a little boy, but because a SEAL transcribed his training int This is such a great book! Thank you Eric Davis for passing on your knowledge and experiences in being the ultimate parent/father! I wish this book would have came back out in 1998 when my son was born. Although my son is in college now, after what I just read, I now have renewed sense of motivation of elevating my parenting skills after all these years. I definitely recommend this book not because I have admired the SEALs since I was a little boy, but because a SEAL transcribed his training into that of being a good father to mentor other fathers who want to be the best that they can be. And if you want to be the best father that you can be then you need to read this!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Rivas

    I had the opinion of being in the military was a foolish choice, but the more I read books from people who had a career in the military I have changed my opinion. Most of the advice in this book is sound, and I plan on applying a couple of things. Some advice I won't because I do not trust myself. What I mean is the author writes about the water training he gave his kids and the adventures he went on with them also. I don't feel like I have the training to put my kids in learning situations as h I had the opinion of being in the military was a foolish choice, but the more I read books from people who had a career in the military I have changed my opinion. Most of the advice in this book is sound, and I plan on applying a couple of things. Some advice I won't because I do not trust myself. What I mean is the author writes about the water training he gave his kids and the adventures he went on with them also. I don't feel like I have the training to put my kids in learning situations as he did safely.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Russ Adcox

    I wanted to give this one a lower rating but, after reading the other reviews, I decided my beef was with the narrator more than the author. I listened to it through Audible and the narrator ruined it for me. I guess he was trying "sound like a SEAL" but it came off more like a slower paced, hokier version of an announcer for a Monster Truck Rally. I actually cranked up the reading speed on the app and pushed through to the finish. I wanted to give this one a lower rating but, after reading the other reviews, I decided my beef was with the narrator more than the author. I listened to it through Audible and the narrator ruined it for me. I guess he was trying "sound like a SEAL" but it came off more like a slower paced, hokier version of an announcer for a Monster Truck Rally. I actually cranked up the reading speed on the app and pushed through to the finish.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lake Obiagu

    Made me feel like crap This was simply a phenomenal book on fatherhood. All of Eric's stories made me feel like an inadequate dad but I'm okay with that because it motivated me to work on myself. Enter this book without the ego and with an open mind and you're sure to walk away a different man. Made me feel like crap This was simply a phenomenal book on fatherhood. All of Eric's stories made me feel like an inadequate dad but I'm okay with that because it motivated me to work on myself. Enter this book without the ego and with an open mind and you're sure to walk away a different man.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Subu Balan

    I’m not sure if I liked this book or not so here’s the breakdown. I liked it for the simple tips it offers for dads to set rules, follow-through, get out, apply Seal principles in real life and have the intention/attitude to lead by example; but would I demand respect from my kids by pushing them to the edge (like subjecting them to a Seal drill in deep sea?!)...certainly not.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Love this book!! I am also Army officer and can see how well this translates. Eric Davis has heavily meditating on thoughtful parenting. Parenting unique kids (like my 3 sons under 7) really does require lots of forethought, a guidebook, and consistency.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Written for fathers, but no reason why mother's shouldn't read this either. It's so macho though that it's almost corny and it's half autobiography really. But if you can get past all the Hooya's! the author says some very useful stuff about raising sons, from a man's perspective. Written for fathers, but no reason why mother's shouldn't read this either. It's so macho though that it's almost corny and it's half autobiography really. But if you can get past all the Hooya's! the author says some very useful stuff about raising sons, from a man's perspective.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Belisa

    From the moment I got this book I couldn't put it down, the stories are great and applicable to everyday life. Loving this book on how to become a better parent. From the moment I got this book I couldn't put it down, the stories are great and applicable to everyday life. Loving this book on how to become a better parent.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Great job Eric- a great tool in helping make our boys men. This will prove to be more important in the years to come. Look around at our men today.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scott Morris

    Really liked this book. Raw. Practical. Want to go back and process some of the end-of-chapter questions.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Khoa

    This book offers a very fresh view on becoming a father as well as a man that others can rely on. I enjoy the lessons taught in this book since the SEAL mindset share the same view as mine.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marty Shorter Jr.

    Book that helps men learn something about raising and leading men.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. “Parenting kicks your ass. Like war it propels you to innovate and operate with high levels of excellence and proficiency.” An intense SEAL training perspective combined with heartfelt passion for raising adults. One of the most entertaining and enjoyable parenting books I’ve read this year. ————————— Movement or action Movement- no goal Success of father- defined by contribution to family Reclaim role Asymmetrical and unconventional warfare. Lead, love and teach. Repurposing sea training for fatherho “Parenting kicks your ass. Like war it propels you to innovate and operate with high levels of excellence and proficiency.” An intense SEAL training perspective combined with heartfelt passion for raising adults. One of the most entertaining and enjoyable parenting books I’ve read this year. ————————— Movement or action Movement- no goal Success of father- defined by contribution to family Reclaim role Asymmetrical and unconventional warfare. Lead, love and teach. Repurposing sea training for fatherhood Clear end state Showcasing the extreme to understand and teach the basics. Objective: bond, trust and respecting relationship Parent on purpose Redefine an entire generation of men and boys Flawless execution is bullshit Your dive partner Sugar cookies Slushee Giving verbal slushees they need and drop down desire Sports and adventure to fulfill ancient drive to hunt and fight Positive self Zero self Negative self Fuck up and own it When your a team like a family is it doesn’t matter who fucked up. Focus on the desired outcome and get shit done. Easier to keep up than catch up Goon squad Consistent rudder corrections Say yes Consistently and real time Be engaged Safe haven Consistent leadership Not what to learn but how to learn Ask why? 2x How? 1x Mindset matters Sealed mindset leaders Yatch Dreamstealers Cope with it Gotwa : Going Others I’m taking Time return What to do if I don’t return Actions to take in emergency Confrontation Bullies “Did you say that to hurt my feelings?” On time On target Reactive corrections Dog & child training Trust and respect Control Rewards and positive reinforcement Gentle coaxing to build confidence Balance tough love Immediate punishment that fits crime Bare minimum to get lesson across Consistent training Building child’s confidence Successive repetition IAD immediate action drills Mind over matter Think of your day as a mission More productive and appreciative These people do t seem to understate concept of being ready at a moments notice. It takes them twenty minutes to get out the door. Maybe 18 if there’s a fire. This life goes beyond me. I’m creating a legacy beyond them. Every stage is temporary & will be gone before we know. Last times. We before me Not good or bad but a building block Turn the perception of misery off Believing in a higher purpose Having an objective Passion Belgian Malinois-(mal en waz) 1400# psi bite Operant conditioning Science that effects and controls behavior No bad dogs only bad handlers Violence of action Battlefield or parent field Respond quickly and aggressively I told you so You don’t have to be a prick when you reprimand your child. Confidence swagger - experience What we should concern ourselves with and not Higher sense of purpose Rise above all the bs Wow it’s great that you worked so hard at that! Praise Effort Participation trophy Appropriate -when building a NEW skill -PUT IN BEST EFFORT -to keep trying those who don’t place -get someone’s attention Mediocrity is a disease Failure is always an option Afraid of failure Own it and grow from it Winning is when you keep going after a setback This is a really important lesson... Experience failure & then triumph Counter culture Never stop no matter what The real world is hyper competitive Sometimes you are going to loose Preserveerance The only easy day was yesterday Life is a series of challenges Continuous growth Americans pursue comfort more than most Confidence vs arrogance Happy puppy belly Quick to take the training wheels off Get some $100 or penny double for 16 days Do you pursue comfort or purpose What training is your son involved in to build confidence? Apathy or lethargy Pushing or Nudging Level of force 1-gentle 2-firm 3-fight for your life Bully Don’t give them what they want Stoic and don’t react They will get bored Everyone around us have different impacts on our lives Parents impact and care Ignore judgement of those who don’t care for you Proofing phase

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Title: Raising Men: Lessons Navy SEALs Learned from Their Training and Taught to Their Sons Author: Eric Davis This book is about: Eric Davis is a SEAL Team instructor. He writes about his experience as a SEAL Team member and instructor and applies it to parenting. He talks specifically to his knowledge of how he raised his son and how he continues to mentor him throughout both their lives. Davis does have daughters, but spends 99% of the book focused on raising men. I loved: I loved the book. Many Title: Raising Men: Lessons Navy SEALs Learned from Their Training and Taught to Their Sons Author: Eric Davis This book is about: Eric Davis is a SEAL Team instructor. He writes about his experience as a SEAL Team member and instructor and applies it to parenting. He talks specifically to his knowledge of how he raised his son and how he continues to mentor him throughout both their lives. Davis does have daughters, but spends 99% of the book focused on raising men. I loved: I loved the book. Many times you get a “parenting” book and it’s all the same. Do this and don’t do that…but this book was different. For one, it’s from a Navy SEAL. He retells some of his stories from when he was in training, when he was active military and when he became in instructor. The principals learned from years of service apply particularly well with his son. Reading this book made me wonder: Where and how I could add some of the concepts. And what it would look like in my life while raising my sons. I want to raise my boys to be men of courage, honor and strength. I want them to have discipline, leadership and adventure. I don’t want to see them fail, but knowing they need to fall in order to stand. I wonder how they will turn out. I wonder what amazing things they will do. My prayer is that all of their dreams will come true and I pray that I have the wisdom to help get them there. Overall, the book was: I give the book 3.5 stars out of 5.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dusty Juhl

    I've read a lot of books written by people who have served in all branches of the military. As a guy, I do find some enjoyment in the tales of woe told by former service members, reflecting on their time in the service, and how hard some of the training was, or how hard some of the trainers were on them at the time. I don't think the large focus on Eric's military experience detracted from the main point of the book. However, I could tell within the first few chapters that this book is loaded wi I've read a lot of books written by people who have served in all branches of the military. As a guy, I do find some enjoyment in the tales of woe told by former service members, reflecting on their time in the service, and how hard some of the training was, or how hard some of the trainers were on them at the time. I don't think the large focus on Eric's military experience detracted from the main point of the book. However, I could tell within the first few chapters that this book is loaded with B.S. It's still an entertaining read/listen, but here's a man who's a divorced father, who'd spend 6-9 months away for each deployment while in the military, who now has grown children he still tries to connect with, and he's telling you how to be a good father, having been an absentee father during much of his military career. The book includes excerpts from his own son (he's proud of his father's military service, and rightfully so) who never held his absences against him. Still, it's hard to find such people credible on a topic like this. It seems like every Navy SEAL thinks they can write a book based on their military experience, and relate it to the common man. The story of the five hour swim made that impossible for me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Denise Summers

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I wasn't sure I would like this book knowing it would be a testosterone-fest. However, he had really great points and insight about raising kids. Much of it was just good parenting choices. He wrote that it is important to know your kids friends, let your kids fail so they will try harder and eventually succeed on their own, dealing with bullies, not letting kids sit in front of the TV or games, instead being with them outside and teaching them a healthier lifestyle. He made a great suggestion f I wasn't sure I would like this book knowing it would be a testosterone-fest. However, he had really great points and insight about raising kids. Much of it was just good parenting choices. He wrote that it is important to know your kids friends, let your kids fail so they will try harder and eventually succeed on their own, dealing with bullies, not letting kids sit in front of the TV or games, instead being with them outside and teaching them a healthier lifestyle. He made a great suggestion for parents to make yourself interesting so your kids will want to spend time with you. He chastised parents who work, eat, watch TV then go to bed, not spending quality time engaging their kids. He had many valid parenting points and I wished I had read this when my kids were little. It would have made me a better parent. Hopefully, my kids will be better parents than we were.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Raising Men is a short book on parenting written by a Navy Seal. The book is full of ideas and concepts with many guest appearances by the author's wife, son, and colleagues from the Seals. Raising Men has a handful of great ideas that can be applied to parenting. I think the downside is that those ideas are challenging for many adults to grasp... let alone children. The best ideas in this book are actually contributions from other Navy Seals and not the author. Lastly, there are some concepts t Raising Men is a short book on parenting written by a Navy Seal. The book is full of ideas and concepts with many guest appearances by the author's wife, son, and colleagues from the Seals. Raising Men has a handful of great ideas that can be applied to parenting. I think the downside is that those ideas are challenging for many adults to grasp... let alone children. The best ideas in this book are actually contributions from other Navy Seals and not the author. Lastly, there are some concepts that are probably just not good ideas. The author is very proud and you can sense this as you make your way through the text. Overall, it wasn't bad but it wasn't good. I would say it's worth reading, but don't expect excellence.

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