Hot Best Seller

The First Men in the Moon (1000 Copy Limited Edition)

Availability: Ready to download

When an eccentric scientist invents antigravity, he decides to build a spherical spaceship. He enlists the help of a London businessman to accompany him to the moon. On arrival, they discover that the moon is inhabited by a sophisticated extraterrestrial civilization. They must use their wits to avoid beasts and monsters, to survive their encounter with aliens, and to esca When an eccentric scientist invents antigravity, he decides to build a spherical spaceship. He enlists the help of a London businessman to accompany him to the moon. On arrival, they discover that the moon is inhabited by a sophisticated extraterrestrial civilization. They must use their wits to avoid beasts and monsters, to survive their encounter with aliens, and to escape captivity. H. G. Wells is credited with the popularisation of time travel in 1895 with The Time Machine, introducing the idea of time being the "fourth dimension" a decade before the publication of Einstein's first Relativity papers. In 1896, he imagined a mad scientist creating human-like beings from animals in The Island of Doctor Moreau, which created a growing interest in animal welfare throughout Europe. In 1897 with The Invisible Man, Wells shows how a formula could render one invisible, recognizing that an invisible eye would not be able to focus, thus rendering the invisible man blind. With The War of the Worlds in 1898, Wells established the idea that an advanced civilization could live on Mars, popularising the term 'martian' and the idea that aliens could invade Earth.


Compare

When an eccentric scientist invents antigravity, he decides to build a spherical spaceship. He enlists the help of a London businessman to accompany him to the moon. On arrival, they discover that the moon is inhabited by a sophisticated extraterrestrial civilization. They must use their wits to avoid beasts and monsters, to survive their encounter with aliens, and to esca When an eccentric scientist invents antigravity, he decides to build a spherical spaceship. He enlists the help of a London businessman to accompany him to the moon. On arrival, they discover that the moon is inhabited by a sophisticated extraterrestrial civilization. They must use their wits to avoid beasts and monsters, to survive their encounter with aliens, and to escape captivity. H. G. Wells is credited with the popularisation of time travel in 1895 with The Time Machine, introducing the idea of time being the "fourth dimension" a decade before the publication of Einstein's first Relativity papers. In 1896, he imagined a mad scientist creating human-like beings from animals in The Island of Doctor Moreau, which created a growing interest in animal welfare throughout Europe. In 1897 with The Invisible Man, Wells shows how a formula could render one invisible, recognizing that an invisible eye would not be able to focus, thus rendering the invisible man blind. With The War of the Worlds in 1898, Wells established the idea that an advanced civilization could live on Mars, popularising the term 'martian' and the idea that aliens could invade Earth.

30 review for The First Men in the Moon (1000 Copy Limited Edition)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Forget The Invisible Man and The Time Machine, this should be considered a timeless classic by Wells! The science is outdated and fantastical, but it has all the wonder and intrigue of science fiction. It is an eccentric blend of tongue in cheek humor, swashbuckling adventure, and chilling despair. It is one of the most entertaining science fiction books I've read, and this is from a major Isaac Asimov fan! I particularly love the imaginative and visually rich world that Wells has created! It is Forget The Invisible Man and The Time Machine, this should be considered a timeless classic by Wells! The science is outdated and fantastical, but it has all the wonder and intrigue of science fiction. It is an eccentric blend of tongue in cheek humor, swashbuckling adventure, and chilling despair. It is one of the most entertaining science fiction books I've read, and this is from a major Isaac Asimov fan! I particularly love the imaginative and visually rich world that Wells has created! It is stunning, exotic, and wonderfully foreign, frightening, and bizarre. I won't say anything of what Cavor and Bedford find on the Moon, because it is best experienced first hand, but I wish the Moon was really like that! So, if you want to give Wells a try, go for this one! It is excellent!

  2. 5 out of 5

    W

    Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin got to the moon in 1969,the astronauts of H.G.Wells were already there in 1900. They get there courtesy of a new material,cavorite,which negates gravity.They find extraterrestrial life on the moon,which captures them. They experience weightlessness and find gold on the moon.One comes back,the other is left on the moon. I didn't enjoy it particularly.When Wells talks about the science of it,I found it fairly boring,and way too long. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin got to the moon in 1969,the astronauts of H.G.Wells were already there in 1900. They get there courtesy of a new material,cavorite,which negates gravity.They find extraterrestrial life on the moon,which captures them. They experience weightlessness and find gold on the moon.One comes back,the other is left on the moon. I didn't enjoy it particularly.When Wells talks about the science of it,I found it fairly boring,and way too long.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    ...and no cheese to be found... When Mr Bedford's financial difficulties become pressing, he leaves London for the quiet of the Kentish countryside to write a play which he is sure will win him fame and fortune, despite him never having written anything before. Instead, he meets his new neighbour Mr Cavor, an eccentric scientist, and becomes intrigued and excited by the possibilities of the invention Cavor is working on – a substance that will defy gravity. Bedford, always with an eye for the ma ...and no cheese to be found... When Mr Bedford's financial difficulties become pressing, he leaves London for the quiet of the Kentish countryside to write a play which he is sure will win him fame and fortune, despite him never having written anything before. Instead, he meets his new neighbour Mr Cavor, an eccentric scientist, and becomes intrigued and excited by the possibilities of the invention Cavor is working on – a substance that will defy gravity. Bedford, always with an eye for the main chance, begins to imagine the commercial possibilities of such a substance, but Cavor is more interested in the glory that he will gain from the scientific community. And so it is that these two mismatched men find themselves as partners on an incredible voyage – to the Moon! I do not remember before that night thinking at all of the risks we were running. Now they came like that array of spectres that once beleaguered Prague, and camped around me. The strangeness of what we were about to do, the unearthliness of it, overwhelmed me. I was like a man awakened out of pleasant dreams to the most horrible surroundings. I lay, eyes wide open, and the sphere seemed to get more flimsy and feeble, and Cavor more unreal and fantastic, and the whole enterprise madder and madder every moment. I got out of bed and wandered about. I sat at the window and stared at the immensity of space. Between the stars was the void, the unfathomable darkness! I've been thoroughly enjoying revisiting some of the HG Wells stories I enjoyed in my youth, and reading for the first time the ones I missed back then. As with the others, I read the Oxford World's Classics version, which has the usual informative and enjoyable introduction, this time from Simon J James, Professor of Victorian Literature and Head of the Department of English Studies at Durham University, which sets the book in its historical and literary context. This is one I hadn't read before and perhaps it's fair to say it's one of the less well known ones, though only in comparison to the universal fame of some of the others, like The War of the Worlds or The Time Machine. While I think it hasn't got quite the depth of those, it's at least as enjoyable, if not more so. Mostly this is because of the characterisation and the interplay between the two men, which give the book a lot of humour. Bedford, our narrator, is rather a selfish cad without too much going on in the way of ethics or heroism, but I found him impossible to dislike. He's so honest about his own personality, not apologising for it, but not hypocritically trying to make himself seem like anything other than what he is – someone who's out for what he can get. Cavor also has some issues with ethics, though in his case it's not about greed. He's one of these scientists who is so obsessed with his own theories and experiments, he doesn't much care what impact they might have on other people – even the possibility that he might accidentally destroy the world seems like an acceptable risk to him. He simply won't tell the world it's in danger, so nobody has to worry about it. “It’s this accursed science,” I cried. “It’s the very Devil. The mediæval priests and persecutors were right and the Moderns are all wrong. You tamper with it—and it offers you gifts. And directly you take them it knocks you to pieces in some unexpected way. Old passions and new weapons—now it upsets your religion, now it upsets your social ideas, now it whirls you off to desolation and misery!” To a large degree, this is a straightforward adventure novel with a great story and lots of danger and excitement. But, being Wells, there are also underlying themes relating to contemporary concerns: primarily two, in this case. Firstly, through Cavor's invention of Cavorite (the name gives an indication of Cavor's desire for glory, I feel!), Wells looks at the huge leaps that were being made in the fields of science and technology and issues a warning that, while these promise great progress for mankind, they also threaten potential catastrophe if the science isn't tempered by ethical controls. Secondly, through the race of beings that Cavor and Bedford find when they arrive on the moon, Wells speculates on a form of society so utopian in its social control that it becomes positively terrifying! He uses this society, though, as a vehicle to comment on the less than utopian situation back on Earth, though I couldn't help feeling he frequently had his tongue stuck firmly in his cheek as he did so. The stuff was not unlike a terrestrial mushroom, only it was much laxer in texture, and, as one swallowed it, it warmed the throat. At first we experienced a mere mechanical satisfaction in eating; then our blood began to run warmer, and we tingled at the lips and fingers, and then new and slightly irrelevant ideas came bubbling up in our minds. “It’s good,” said I. “Infernally good! What a home for our surplus population! Our poor surplus population,” and I broke off another large portion. But the themes are treated more lightly in this one, and Wells allows his imagination free rein. One of the things I enjoyed most was how he includes a lot of realistic science even as he creates an impossible substance in Cavorite and an equally impossible race of moon-beings, the Selenites. Of course we've all looked down on Earth from planes now, but Wells imagines how it would look from space. He describes convincingly how to control a sphere covered in Cavorite by using gravity and the slingshot effect of planetary mass. He describes the weightlessness of zero gravity brilliantly, many decades before anyone had experienced it. His Selenites are a vision of evolved insect life, which frankly gave me the shivers, especially when he describes how they are bred, reared and surgically altered to happily fulfil a single function in life – a kind of precursor of the humans in Brave New World but with insect faces and arms!! I won't give spoilers as to what happens to the men, but the ending gives a minor commentary on one of Wells' other recurring themes – man's tendency to look on other people's territory as fair game for invasion and colonisation. But since you're now thinking – but wait! That IS a spoiler! I assure you it's really not, but you'll have to read the book to find out why it's not. Or you could just read it because it's a great read – lots of humour, great descriptive writing, enough depth to keep it interesting without overwhelming the story, a couple of characters you can't help liking even though you feel you shouldn't, and plenty of excitement. What are you waiting for? Jump aboard the Cavorite sphere – you don't get the chance to go to the Moon every day of the week! NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Oxford World's Classics. www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com

  4. 5 out of 5

    Denisse

    Back when I read The War of the Worlds I had this dream that I was going to love every book by Wells. To be honest I'm in the cliché part with this author. Lets say I loved his most iconic works and got bored with his indie ones. I don't know what it was with The First Men in the Moon, it started very interesting I have no idea when it lost me. The first half was great but the second half, well, I have no idea. Anyway I can't go lower than 3 stars, the man was a visionary! No es el estilo, ni l Back when I read The War of the Worlds I had this dream that I was going to love every book by Wells. To be honest I'm in the cliché part with this author. Lets say I loved his most iconic works and got bored with his indie ones. I don't know what it was with The First Men in the Moon, it started very interesting I have no idea when it lost me. The first half was great but the second half, well, I have no idea. Anyway I can't go lower than 3 stars, the man was a visionary! No es el estilo, ni la forma en que está escrito, ni el tema. No se que fue. Wells escribió todo con el mismo formato solo que usando ideas distintas y con cambios en el desarrollo, pero tiene una formula muy bien construida, una fórmula que me funciono de maravilla en La Máquina del Tiempo y La Guerra de los Mundos, por desgracia en esta nueva novela me perdió en algún momento a mitad de desarrollo. Pero para ser honestos este hombre tenía una imaginación loquísima y unas ideas muy avanzadas. Sus descripciones son tan detalladas que sorprenden. Los primeros hombres en la Luna no es un libro tan dinámico como otras novelas del autor y hoy en día su mayor obstáculo seria que no puede competir con ellas ya que no encierra tanto misterio como antes. No podemos viajar en el tiempo y no sabemos a ciencia cierta si hay vida inteligente en otros planetas. Pero si tenemos información sobre la Luna, se sabe mucho mas de ella a cada día. Conforme pasas las paginas, la trama deja de ser ciencia ficción y se torna más en fantasía. Aun así, la idea es buena y la primera mitad muy interesante. No deja de sorprenderme la ciencia ficción vieja, tiene algo de especial, una chispa que no se encuentra con facilidad en libros actuales.

  5. 4 out of 5

    César Bustíos

    "So utterly at variance is Destiny with all the little plans of men." What a fun trip this was! Reading the book at the dawn of the 20th century must have been even more exciting I guess. The book also served as inspiration for C. S. Lewis' science fiction books. And of course Cavorite, the name of the antigravity material used in the story, will later be borrowed for a myriad of works. ⠀ ⠀ This is the journey of two men, a scientist and a businessman, to the moon. They will discover that the moon "So utterly at variance is Destiny with all the little plans of men." What a fun trip this was! Reading the book at the dawn of the 20th century must have been even more exciting I guess. The book also served as inspiration for C. S. Lewis' science fiction books. And of course Cavorite, the name of the antigravity material used in the story, will later be borrowed for a myriad of works. ⠀ ⠀ This is the journey of two men, a scientist and a businessman, to the moon. They will discover that the moon is inhabited by an extraterrestrial civilisation, the "selenites", whose society is based in specialisation. These insect-like beings come in different sizes and shapes and together they form an entomological nightmare that will haunt me until I kick the bucket. They live in an enormous system of caverns and, guess what, gold is the most common mineral. To me, it's a criticism of the society of that time and the inescapable greed and violence of human nature. A satire, if you will. Even though it's dated and it's full of nonsense from a scientific point of view, it was a very enjoyable read for me. Sometimes I can't believe it was written 120 years ago.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

    This book was most interesting and quite an adventure. Two men, namely Bedford and Cavor, travel to the moon in a sphere designed by Cavor. When they arrive there, they are most amazed at what they see, something like snow, plants growing at alarming rates, and strange beings called Selenites among others. The adventure actually takes place 'inside' the moon after Bedford falls into a crevice as the two explore the surface, after the 'snow' lures them out of the safety of thier sphere. Well after This book was most interesting and quite an adventure. Two men, namely Bedford and Cavor, travel to the moon in a sphere designed by Cavor. When they arrive there, they are most amazed at what they see, something like snow, plants growing at alarming rates, and strange beings called Selenites among others. The adventure actually takes place 'inside' the moon after Bedford falls into a crevice as the two explore the surface, after the 'snow' lures them out of the safety of thier sphere. Well after an entire range of adventures, including a fight with the moon beings, eating moon plants, having to endure a disgusting blue light, and finally separating, Bedford finds the sphere, tries looking for and signalling to Cavor but never finds him, and finally heads back to earth. After many months elapse and Bedford gets his earthly life back in order, he receives a message from a Julius Wendigee regarding messages being received form space in english. Well the messages actually emanate from Cavor who day by day has been and continues to send messages regarding his experiences. This continues until one day the messages stop. This is the last that Bedford hears of Cavor. Well in the usual Wells style, a great adventure. I've left out too much detail, so hear what, JUST READ IT!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alex Bright

    The Men in the Moon was an unsuspected, joyful surprise! The narration I listened to, by Alexander Vlahos was excellent -- just over-the-top enough to bring the Wells' story to life. In any case, it's immensely satisfying to have a story so well told that its visualization is both intricate and easy for the listener/reader. This late-Victorian novel (1901) tells the story of a naive, idealistic scientist named Cavor, and his industrialist/capitalist companion, Bedford, who also serves as the pri The Men in the Moon was an unsuspected, joyful surprise! The narration I listened to, by Alexander Vlahos was excellent -- just over-the-top enough to bring the Wells' story to life. In any case, it's immensely satisfying to have a story so well told that its visualization is both intricate and easy for the listener/reader. This late-Victorian novel (1901) tells the story of a naive, idealistic scientist named Cavor, and his industrialist/capitalist companion, Bedford, who also serves as the primary narrator. Cavor builds a sphere which conveys them to the moon, where Bedford hopes to find something, anything, to make him (them, perhaps) rich. They are completely at odds in their view of the world and, consequently, the moon. That's the set up, but the story is so much more fantastical than anything I could have imagined. I honestly didn't expect this to be so brilliantly funny, having only read The Time Machine and War of the Worlds, which aren't comedic in the slightest. What surprised me further was that it's more satire than science fiction, at least to modern eyes, and reminds me a great deal of Gulliver's Travels crossed with A Brave New World. Wells handles his pseudo sciences of space travel and social engineering with such a lightness and joviality as to render the audience nearly pacified in the wake of his underlying commentary on humanity until closer to the end. Wells certainly had his finger on the pulse of human greed, arrogance, ignorance, and violence -- especially when it comes to its relationship to anything it perceives as "other." Bedford encapsulates this pulse, while Cavor represents... what? The hope Wells has for the best of humanity. If, perhaps, a bit too credulous. (Side note: Part of me wonders if it's all a commentary on the stupid, arrogant white man and his colonialism.) The Selenites -- oh, the Selenites! They were wonderfully imaginative! As were the descriptions of the moon and everything on and in it. But I'll leave that for others to discover. I'm glad I went into this narrative with few preconceived notions, because it only added to my astonishment that such a whimsical (and thought-provoking) novel could be written by H. G. Wells.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Noah Goats

    These old science fiction novels are handy reminders that some of the knowledge we have now, and that seems perfectly obvious to anyone who grew up with it, was unknown not that long ago. The craters on the moon are discussed in this book in a way that makes it clear that H.G. Wells didn't know about asteroid strikes. I do not hold this against him, of course, these glimpses back into the state of the science over 100 years ago are one of the reasons I like to read old science fiction. This novel These old science fiction novels are handy reminders that some of the knowledge we have now, and that seems perfectly obvious to anyone who grew up with it, was unknown not that long ago. The craters on the moon are discussed in this book in a way that makes it clear that H.G. Wells didn't know about asteroid strikes. I do not hold this against him, of course, these glimpses back into the state of the science over 100 years ago are one of the reasons I like to read old science fiction. This novel is an enjoyable read. The protagonist narrator, Bedford, is an amoral scoundrel who would definitely exploit the dickens out of the aliens who live on the moon if only he gets the opportunity. In some of the other novels I've read by Wells, his protagonists have seemed pretty boring, but Bedford is a lot of fun. It's interesting that 120 years ago the idea that we might abuse the aliens rather than visa versa had already occurred to at least one writer of the genre. Bedford is also stupid. Having a stupid narrator is helpful in science fiction because you don't have to make any real attempt at explaining the (likely nonsensical) science that drives the book. The narrator can just say, as Bedford does, "He talked with an air of being extremely lucid about the 'ether' and 'tubes of force' and 'gravitational potential'. . .but I do not think he ever suspected how much I did not understand him." I have employed the device of the ignorant narrator in my own science fiction writing, and it really gets you off the hook of having to explain anything. I do not think I would want to put Wells in charge of creating the government or society that I live under. In The World Set Free he seems to be arguing for a kind of benevolent totalitarianism, and it creeps in here as well where he describes the society of the creatures living in the moon (the Selenites) where, "every citizen knows his place. He is born to that place, and the elaborate discipline of training and education and surgery he undergoes fits him at last so completely to it that he has neither ideas nor organs for any purpose beyond it." In fact, the society of the Selenites is a lot like the one described by Huxley in Brave New World, except that I think Wells largely approves of it, or at least finds it attractive. His sympathetic human character is uncomfortable with certain aspects of the way society is organized on the moon, but on the whole, he seems to think it's better than what we are doing on earth. If you like old science fiction, this book is not to be missed. Lots of interesting stuff in here. Out of the H.G. Wells novels I've read (including The War of the Worlds, The World Set Free, and The Invisible Man), it's probably my favorite, with The War of the Worlds coming in a close second and the other two tied for a very distant third.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gabi

    This novel was such an unexpected fun recounting of how an idealistic explorer and a businessman fly to the moon. The tone of the narration is pleasantly tongue-in-cheek and doesn't take itself seriously. And the moon ... what a wonderful vivid imagination. Forget that it is dated, just enjoy. This novel was such an unexpected fun recounting of how an idealistic explorer and a businessman fly to the moon. The tone of the narration is pleasantly tongue-in-cheek and doesn't take itself seriously. And the moon ... what a wonderful vivid imagination. Forget that it is dated, just enjoy.

  10. 5 out of 5

    E. G.

    Biographical Note Introduction Further Reading Note on the Text --The First Men in the Moon Notes

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (ladybug)

    A story where Mr. Bedford (a penniless Business man) meets a Scientist name of Dr. Cavor. Dr Cavor has invented a substance that can neutralize the effects of Gravity. Mr Bedford sees a chance to change his fortunes using this substance to travel to the Moon. While on the Moon, Mr Bedford and Dr Cavor find such strange sights as the Selenites, plants growing at alarming rates and other such awe inspiring things. While this book was written by the Author of The War of the Worlds and The Island of A story where Mr. Bedford (a penniless Business man) meets a Scientist name of Dr. Cavor. Dr Cavor has invented a substance that can neutralize the effects of Gravity. Mr Bedford sees a chance to change his fortunes using this substance to travel to the Moon. While on the Moon, Mr Bedford and Dr Cavor find such strange sights as the Selenites, plants growing at alarming rates and other such awe inspiring things. While this book was written by the Author of The War of the Worlds and The Island of Dr. Moreau, this book isn't as well known. I often wondered why people were taken in by the "War of the World's" radio play, but having listened to this book I can see it. At this point of time, people didn't know what was on the Moon. It was a mysteries force that was unknown and at this time unexplored. Anything could be there. There is life on Earth, why not the moon and mars? H.G. Wells, a genius of descriptions, brings you to the moon along with his characters. You can see the Selenites, the warrens under the Moons surface, actually even breathe the thin air with Mr. Bedford and Dr Cavor. You can see Dr Cavor waving his arms around and being non-confrontational and Mr. Bedford in his antagonistic best. The last few chapters tended to drag for me, but overall a wonderful early SciFi book about space and the possibilities to be found there.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jemppu

    Well, that was quite delightfully queer.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim Smith

    Starts almost surreally twee and light. Becomes increasingly dark and weird. Felt as if the final stretch were tacked onto the original serialisation, but the ending made it worth it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    This is not my favorite H. G. Wells novel. I really enjoyed The Island of Dr. Moreau last fall--it won the creepy contest sponsored by Softdrink & Heather in their annual Dueling Monsters challenge. And The Invisible Man garnered 4 stars this year. But The First Men in the Moon is one of Wells' lesser known novels--and I think deservedly so. It is the story of two men who find a way to journey to the moon (back at the turn of the last century). There is the brilliant scientific theorist who comes This is not my favorite H. G. Wells novel. I really enjoyed The Island of Dr. Moreau last fall--it won the creepy contest sponsored by Softdrink & Heather in their annual Dueling Monsters challenge. And The Invisible Man garnered 4 stars this year. But The First Men in the Moon is one of Wells' lesser known novels--and I think deservedly so. It is the story of two men who find a way to journey to the moon (back at the turn of the last century). There is the brilliant scientific theorist who comes up with the method and the failed business man (and current attempted playwright) who prods the theorist into putting his ideas into practice. The business man, of course, has visions of what they might discover on the moon and bring back to Earth for a profit. He might actually make something of himself... The scientist, one Mr. Cavor by name, has come up with a substance (dubbed Cavorite) that will block the force of gravity. Coat a spherical ship with the stuff and manipulate it just right and off you go to the moon! It's just that easy. And so they do. They arrive on the moon to find that, miracle of miracles, they can breathe the air. It's a bit thin, but workable. And when they get lost and can't find their ship, why they can eat the moon-vegetation as well. The only ill-effect is drunkenness. Well, that, and they come out of their stupor to find that they have been captured by the natives of the moon. Their captors take them down inside the moon. Bedford, the businessman, fears what the Selenites (that's what the moon-people are called) might do to them and a grand escape and chase and action-hero fighting take place. It looks like our two protagonists will make a clean get-away. But then they are silly enough to separate. Bedford finds the sphere and Cavor is re-captured. Bedford has an idea that he might head back to Earth and bring back reinforcements, but things don't go exactly as planned. The book ends with communications that are received from Cavor and a bit of Wells' usual philosophizing on the war-like nature of man. You'd think with the action, this would be an interesting book. But it just didn't pull me in the way the chase across Moreau's island did. And I didn't really care for either of the main characters. Cavor is a bit endearing as the one-track-minded scientist who can't really see the practical side of things--but not enough to win me over. Two stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    The 1960 film The Time Machine starring Rod Taylor is am adulteration of H.G. Wells' novel by the same name. The Eloi speak English and each and everyone of them appear to desire Rod Taylor; well, who doesn't? The whole enterprise appears to be a cautionary tale about Nuclear War and Free Love. I approached The First Men In The Moon with a wary eye about such cinematic mistreatments. I suspect Eric Roberts would star in this one. It should be noted that I was puzzled by the title, about the verb The 1960 film The Time Machine starring Rod Taylor is am adulteration of H.G. Wells' novel by the same name. The Eloi speak English and each and everyone of them appear to desire Rod Taylor; well, who doesn't? The whole enterprise appears to be a cautionary tale about Nuclear War and Free Love. I approached The First Men In The Moon with a wary eye about such cinematic mistreatments. I suspect Eric Roberts would star in this one. It should be noted that I was puzzled by the title, about the verb "in". Was this an Anglosim that had passed from favor? No, idiot, the majority of the novel occurs within the moon: its hollow and rife with Mooncalves, providers of sustaining protein. Wells was operating with only whiff of scientific modernity at his reach. Marconi and Tesla ruminate within these pages, but not much further. Gravity remains the concept with the most play in the novel. It creates a host of possibilities. What fires the whole operation as literature is the dynamic between the two human characters. It is a relationship needled with petulance and despair. The utility of the adventure is argued repeatedly. It is rather bleak and often slow going, but worth the departure and the sage questions it raises.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Oh, for the good old days when men believed that the moon was inhabited by "Selenites" who lived in deep caves underground! H.G. Wells in his The First Men in the Moon takes two Englishmen, the eccentric inventor Cavor and the ne'er-do-well Bedford to the moon in a spherical spaceship using an antigravity substance called Cavorite. Fortunately for these ill-prepared astronauts, the moon has plenty of oxygen, so they don't need a spacesuit with breathing apparatus. In no time at all, they get lost Oh, for the good old days when men believed that the moon was inhabited by "Selenites" who lived in deep caves underground! H.G. Wells in his The First Men in the Moon takes two Englishmen, the eccentric inventor Cavor and the ne'er-do-well Bedford to the moon in a spherical spaceship using an antigravity substance called Cavorite. Fortunately for these ill-prepared astronauts, the moon has plenty of oxygen, so they don't need a spacesuit with breathing apparatus. In no time at all, they get lost and are captured by the Selenites. They manage to get free, thanks to Bedford's savage murder of several of their captors. He manages to find their spaceship, but Cavor is recaptured. No matter, Bedford returns to earth alone with a hoard of lunar gold. Not the violent conquistador like Bedford, Cavor stays behind on the moon and sends messages explaining his dealings with the Selenites. These are suddenly interrupted, leaving us precisely nowhere.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Po Po

    Such a disappointment! I expected so much more from this. I was waiting for some philosophical discourse and musings on some enduring, unalterable and inalienable Truth, as is usually the case in wells' works, but nope. Nothing of the kind in this book. I'm giving it two stars instead of just one because this story was highly imaginative and VERY unpredictable (I liked that I couldn't foresee what would happen about 50 pages before it actually does). I think my main issue with this particular stor Such a disappointment! I expected so much more from this. I was waiting for some philosophical discourse and musings on some enduring, unalterable and inalienable Truth, as is usually the case in wells' works, but nope. Nothing of the kind in this book. I'm giving it two stars instead of just one because this story was highly imaginative and VERY unpredictable (I liked that I couldn't foresee what would happen about 50 pages before it actually does). I think my main issue with this particular story is that it didn't make me care about the two main characters at all, or any other secondary characters. A good story makes the reader feel some emotion, positive or not. I didn't have any emotional connection with anyone in the book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marian

    Wells does it again! This novel of lunar exploration reminds me a lot of The War of the Worlds, though The First Men in the Moon is in some ways more interesting and surprisingly deep. Recommended!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eleri

    Bit boring to be honest. So much of the science was just way off, which was sometimes amusing but mostly irritating. So much of it was description which my brain just switched off for.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Callum McLaughlin

    This is one of Wells' lesser known novels, but I found it just as interesting and enjoyable an entry to his canon of work. As always, I was left both impressed and appreciative of how much the fantastical elements of his stories are based in genuine science. He doesn't take the easy option of just telling us that his characters 'make a space shuttle', he tells us how they do it, but without ever bogging down the narrative. Obviously in this particular case, the speculative scientific elements hav This is one of Wells' lesser known novels, but I found it just as interesting and enjoyable an entry to his canon of work. As always, I was left both impressed and appreciative of how much the fantastical elements of his stories are based in genuine science. He doesn't take the easy option of just telling us that his characters 'make a space shuttle', he tells us how they do it, but without ever bogging down the narrative. Obviously in this particular case, the speculative scientific elements have become outdated. Man has since invented genuine space shuttles, and we have visited the moon. But bearing in mind that this was written 60 years before space travel was even a thing, you can't help but marvel at the richness of Wells' imagination, and how far ahead of his time he was. The first two thirds of the novel are full of a true sense of adventure and wonder, with moments of real action and excitement. Without spoiling anything plot-wise, the final third subtly calls into question the reliability of our narrator, as the story becomes an exploration of the society our intrepid travellers have uncovered on the moon. By drawing both parallels and differences with humanity, Wells cleverly highlights both the strengths and flaws of our own society, and calls into question whether we should really be trying to travel the galaxy at all, given how badly we have treated our own world, and how little we really know about it. This is a theme still hugely relevant today, and yet another example of the timeless quality of Wells' literature. Wells' prose is incredibly accessible; he's definitely a great choice for those normally daunted by classic authors. To say he's readable is not to say his prose isn't also capable of evoking real beauty, however. Take this passage, for example: “Over me, about me, closing in on me, embracing me ever nearer, was the Eternal, that which was before the beginning and that which triumphs over the end; that enormous void in which all light and life and being is but the thin and vanishing splendour of a falling star, the cold, the stillness, the silence - the infinite and final Night of space.” Another solid read. It cements Wells’ place amongst my favourite and most thought-provoking authors.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vera

    Another very nice science fiction story by H.G. Wells. This book was written before the first airplane had flown and Wells writes about a journey to the moon. Jules Verne wrote about travelling to the moon 35 years before Wells. The characters in Verne's book are being shot to the moon a giant projectile, which reminds of the actual space shuttles (which wasn't about to start before a hundred years after Verne's publication!!). Wells, on the other hand, takes a very different, not less creative a Another very nice science fiction story by H.G. Wells. This book was written before the first airplane had flown and Wells writes about a journey to the moon. Jules Verne wrote about travelling to the moon 35 years before Wells. The characters in Verne's book are being shot to the moon a giant projectile, which reminds of the actual space shuttles (which wasn't about to start before a hundred years after Verne's publication!!). Wells, on the other hand, takes a very different, not less creative approach. The key lies in Cavorit, a material that is not sensible to gravity, that was made by Cavor. Cavor meets Bedford, who decides to work together with Cavor, for he sees great potential in this material that makes things weightless. However, Cavors plans turn out to be a bit more extreme than Bedfords - Cavor wants to visit and explore the moon. He designs a giant glass ball with shutters made from Cavorit. When all shutters are closed, the ball is not attracted by the Earths gravitation and will fly up. Opening one or more of the shuttes will cause the ball to move in that direction. And so, without any complication, Bedford and Cavor reach the moon. There they get to live with a few surprises, but I don't want to spoil any more of the story. It's a very entertaining interesting book, and especially if you keep in mind that it's written in 1901!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lostaccount

    “My habits are regular. My time for intercourse – limited” I had to giggle at that! A silly scientist (Cavor) invents an anti-grav paint (Cavorite), coats a sphere with the stuff and with the help of Bedford (Victorian wag), who turns out to be a bit too handy with a crowbar, they float off into space and land on the Moon. In Wells’ imagination the moon is psychedelic. After a bit of farcical leaping about in the moon’s gravity, they encounter a moon species, the Selenites, ant-like beings, at whic “My habits are regular. My time for intercourse – limited” I had to giggle at that! A silly scientist (Cavor) invents an anti-grav paint (Cavorite), coats a sphere with the stuff and with the help of Bedford (Victorian wag), who turns out to be a bit too handy with a crowbar, they float off into space and land on the Moon. In Wells’ imagination the moon is psychedelic. After a bit of farcical leaping about in the moon’s gravity, they encounter a moon species, the Selenites, ant-like beings, at which point, Bedford goes whacko and starts attacking them, then flees in the sphere leaving poor Cavor behind. The “splash down” back to earth is incredibly prophetic, being that it was written long before anybody had any idea of how to get to the moon and back. The messages from Cavor from the moon (with a sneaky poke at the violent Bedford) turn into an awful infodump, but the ending is almost chilling. Overall, a nutty read but fun in a schoolboy adventure sort of way.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rob Thompson

    The First Men in the Moon is a scientific romance by the English author H. G. Wells. First serialised in The Strand Magazine from December 1900 to August 1901 it was later published in hardcover. All in all it's a great swashbuckling adventure story. Of course, age has dated the science but it's still an entertaining blend of humour, danger and excitement. Bedford, our narrator, is an egotistical selfish cad: rather like Terry Thomas. His interplay with Cavor, a detached scientist, is always amu The First Men in the Moon is a scientific romance by the English author H. G. Wells. First serialised in The Strand Magazine from December 1900 to August 1901 it was later published in hardcover. All in all it's a great swashbuckling adventure story. Of course, age has dated the science but it's still an entertaining blend of humour, danger and excitement. Bedford, our narrator, is an egotistical selfish cad: rather like Terry Thomas. His interplay with Cavor, a detached scientist, is always amusing. Plot Summary (view spoiler)[The narrator is a London businessman named Bedford who withdraws to the countryside to write a play, by which he hopes to alleviate his financial problems. Bedford rents a small countryside house in Lympne in Kent, where he wants to work in peace. He is bothered every afternoon, however, at precisely the same time, by a passer-by making odd noises. After two weeks Bedford accosts the man who proves to be a reclusive physicist named Mr. Cavor. Bedford befriends Cavor when he learns he is developing a new material, cavorite, which can negate the force of gravity. When a sheet of cavorite is prematurely processed, it makes the air above it weightless and shoots off into space. Bedford sees in the commercial production of cavorite a possible source of "wealth enough to work any sort of social revolution we fancied; we might own and order the whole world". Cavor hits upon the idea of a spherical spaceship made of "steel, lined with glass", and with sliding "windows or blinds" made of cavorite by which it can be steered, and persuades a reluctant Bedford to undertake a voyage to the Moon; Cavor is certain there is no life there. On the way to the Moon, they experience weightlessness, which Bedford finds "exceedingly restful". On the surface of the Moon the two men discover a desolate landscape, but as the Sun rises, the thin, frozen atmosphere vaporises and strange plants begin to grow with extraordinary rapidity. Bedford and Cavor leave the capsule, but in romping about get lost in the rapidly growing jungle. They hear for the first time a mysterious booming coming from beneath their feet. They encounter "great beasts", "monsters of mere fatness", that they dub "mooncalves", and five-foot-high "Selenites" tending them. At first they hide and crawl about, but growing hungry partake of some "monstrous coralline growths" of fungus that inebriate them. They wander drunkenly until they encounter a party of six extraterrestrials, who capture them. The insectoid lunar natives (referred to as "Selenites", after Selene, the moon goddess) are part of a complex and technologically sophisticated society that lives underground, but this is revealed only in radio communications received from Cavor after Bedford's return to Earth. Bedford and Cavor break out of captivity beneath the surface of the Moon and flee, killing several Selenites. In their flight they discover that gold is common on the Moon. In their attempt to find their way back to the surface and to their sphere, they come upon some Selenites carving up mooncalves but fight their way past. Back on the surface, they split up to search for their spaceship. Bedford finds it but returns to Earth without Cavor, who injured himself in a fall and was recaptured by the Selenites, as Bedford learns from a hastily scribbled note he left behind. By good fortune, the narrator lands in the sea off the coast of Britain, near the seaside town of Littlestone, not far from his point of departure. His fortune is made by some gold he brings back, but he loses the sphere when a curious boy named Tommy Simmons climbs into the unattended sphere and shoots off into space. Bedford writes and publishes his story in The Strand Magazine, then learns that "Mr. Julius Wendigee, a Dutch electrician, who has been experimenting with certain apparatus akin to the apparatus used by Mr. Tesla in America", has picked up fragments of radio communications from Cavor sent from inside the Moon. During a period of relative freedom Cavor has taught two Selenites English and learned much about lunar society. Cavor's account explains that Selenites exist in thousands of forms and find fulfilment in carrying out the specific social function for which they have been brought up: specialisation is the essence of Selenite society. "With knowledge the Selenites grew and changed; mankind stored their knowledge about them and remained brutes—equipped," remarks the Grand Lunar, when he finally meets Cavor and hears about life on Earth. Unfortunately, Cavor reveals humanity's propensity for war; the lunar leader and those listening to the interview are "stricken with amazement". Bedford infers that it is for this reason that Cavor has been prevented from further broadcasting to Earth. Cavor's transmissions are cut off as he is trying to describe how to make cavorite. His final fate is unknown, but Bedford is sure that "we shall never… receive another message from the moon". There are a few underlying themes relating to contemporary concerns. The ordered society of the Selenites is a system without individual freedoms and rights. The insectlike form of the lunar beings highlights this. It gives them a monstrous quality. Bedford fights against the system. But he chooses for his own selfish reasons to steal gold and come back for more. Cavor is fascinated by what he sees. Yet he is prepared only to observe, not to take part. Wells uses the term “citizens” for the Selenites. In reality they are conditioned from birth to perform their preassigned tasks. This is a nightmarish vision of economic conditions in a developed capitalist system. And Bedford typifies the acquisitive capitalist, who irresponsibly pursues gain. (hide spoiler)] A recommended early 20th Century fun schoolboy adventure.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Wilson

    The First Men in the Moon has been one of the most exhilarating, uplifting novels I've read this year. I've really been enjoying digging into Wells for the first time; until now I've found his sci-fi novels entertaining, imaginative and funny. This one however...this one is a humanist masterpiece. Does that sound boring? It's still fun and funny and inventive! At the same time, it tackles empathy, communication, technology, warfare, xenophobia, and human institutions. And with language as lush a The First Men in the Moon has been one of the most exhilarating, uplifting novels I've read this year. I've really been enjoying digging into Wells for the first time; until now I've found his sci-fi novels entertaining, imaginative and funny. This one however...this one is a humanist masterpiece. Does that sound boring? It's still fun and funny and inventive! At the same time, it tackles empathy, communication, technology, warfare, xenophobia, and human institutions. And with language as lush and glorious as the surface of the moon itself. Oh yeah - there's a jungle on the surface of the moon. And talking of the moon - this book was published 68 years before Apollo 11 landed there, but Wells magnificently captured the spirit of space exploration (and maybe also the mysterious spark that separates humans from other animals): It dawned upon me up there in the moon as a thing I ought always to have known, that man is not made simply to go about being safe and comfortable and well fed and amused.... Against his interest, against his happiness, he is constantly being driven to do unreasonable things. Some force not himself impels him, and go he must. But why? Why? How wonderful.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    For the most part I really enjoyed this story. The author certainly knows how to end the chapter on a curious note which makes the reader want to continue. Some of the technical stuff I sort of skimmed over as well as a chapter towards the end, but for the most part this story was really very imaginative and exciting.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lissie Crowther

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I realise that this book was written in an age before our current understanding of the moon and space, but this was only one of the many barriers for me enjoying this book. Synopsis: Strange duo go to moon in a ‘sphere’ that was built by a playwright and a man that likes to hum. The journey goes smoothly. There are moon cows. Moon. Cows. They hallucinate eating moon fungi because they did not pack enough snacks, and this was ultimately their downfall. They are captured by aliens who live IN the mo I realise that this book was written in an age before our current understanding of the moon and space, but this was only one of the many barriers for me enjoying this book. Synopsis: Strange duo go to moon in a ‘sphere’ that was built by a playwright and a man that likes to hum. The journey goes smoothly. There are moon cows. Moon. Cows. They hallucinate eating moon fungi because they did not pack enough snacks, and this was ultimately their downfall. They are captured by aliens who live IN the moon. The title made sense at this point. One man has a great sense of imperialism and immediately wants to steal things and hates the aliens. He says ‘confound you!’ A LOT to them and luckily realises that he has enough strength to just smash the jelly-like creatures in the face without much effort at all. The other guy is a bit more thinky. The smashing alien faces guy escapes and gets really cold but survives. He doesn’t care much about his lost companion and escapes with lots of gold. He has a bit of a dissociative episode contemplating his betrayal on the way home. He gets over it. He lands in a lovely coastal town. The journey was again surprisingly easy. Other men help him with his gold and ask very few questions. Man leaves device that transported him to the moon and back unattended. A small boy steals his spaceship and disappears. His end, one can imagine is dismal, as the spaceship drifts off into the abyss of the universe with a helpless child wasting away all alone. The man literally gives no f***s. He thinks about helping his companion stuck in the moon. He decides he’d rather finish his play. Got loads of gold now, life is good. His moon companion manages to communicate to another science man on Earth. He has managed successful communication with the alien creatures, by teaching them verbs and stuff. I switched off at this point. Maybe the conclusion brought it all together, but I gained very little getting to this point of the story. ⭐️

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Stewart

    Full review can be found here One of H. G. Wells lesser known books (in comparison to the likes of The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, War of The Worlds) I still thought it was worth going into it with the feelings that reading his other books gave me. Set in England, Wells introduces us to Bedford – a man who’s trying to find an easy way to earn money to pay off the debt collectors chasing him... and Professor Cavor, your run-of-the-mill eccentric scientist who has just hit upon an idea for an i Full review can be found here One of H. G. Wells lesser known books (in comparison to the likes of The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, War of The Worlds) I still thought it was worth going into it with the feelings that reading his other books gave me. Set in England, Wells introduces us to Bedford – a man who’s trying to find an easy way to earn money to pay off the debt collectors chasing him... and Professor Cavor, your run-of-the-mill eccentric scientist who has just hit upon an idea for an invention but has no idea what to do with it. The new invention is Cavorite, a material that can block ‘gravity waves’ thus making the object float after the correct scientific treatment. To his credit, Wells doesn't do a Verne and try to go into great scientific explanations, making his narrative character excuse himself as the man with the business brains and not the scientific one. Some of the aspects in this book were very much ahead of Wells' time and I enjoy being able to look back with my 21st Century knowledge and marvel at how things were perceived, either accurately or differently from the reality we now know. The idea of the moon coming to life and being inhabited by beings that live underground in it's hollowed out shell may be pushing the realms of belief too far but this is what science fiction is all about and Wells is one of the original masters as far as I'm concerned. Overall I can see why this book has lasted but at the same time there is a reason it is a little less well-known than his others. It doesn't have that extra something... that draws you so into the book it becomes something you carry with you. If you're a fan of Wells' other works then please, by all means, read this book. If you're interested in early 20th Century works then, again, read it. If you're interested in any part of this book then I can tell you that you will not have wasted any time reading it, but I don't think you'll come away from it changed or affected by it in any way.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Cihodariu

    As a disclaimer, I should state that this was my first and last audiobook experience and the fact that I am now convinced listening to audiobooks is not for me may have put a damper on my perception of the narrative itself. If I ever get to reading this book the proper way, my rating may very well go up by one star. As always, the chief strength of Wells is his ability of weaving a very detailed world, from the initial descriptions of personas and what you can assume about them from their lifest As a disclaimer, I should state that this was my first and last audiobook experience and the fact that I am now convinced listening to audiobooks is not for me may have put a damper on my perception of the narrative itself. If I ever get to reading this book the proper way, my rating may very well go up by one star. As always, the chief strength of Wells is his ability of weaving a very detailed world, from the initial descriptions of personas and what you can assume about them from their lifestyle and quirks, and up to the alien worlds built from scratch. There's no doubt that his pioneering imagination is still causing a major influence in the genre today and deserves its spot in the hall of fame. I just wish I enjoyed the book more but it tended to drag or to be silly in dialogues and descriptions from time to time, though this could be due to the audiobook rendition. I would still recommended it to any fans of sci-fi, British lit or fantasy, as part of a mandatory 'know the roots' experience.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    Wells is always good fun, but this is the least successful of his sci-fi novels that I have encountered, mainly because science did finally catch up with his imagination and prove so many of his suppositions about the moon to be wrong. The narrator chances upon a mad scientist, Cavor, who invents a sort of anti-magnetic element from which they build a ship to propel them to the moon. The atmosphere, geology and composition of the moon are all complete hokum, as are the insect-like inhabitants, t Wells is always good fun, but this is the least successful of his sci-fi novels that I have encountered, mainly because science did finally catch up with his imagination and prove so many of his suppositions about the moon to be wrong. The narrator chances upon a mad scientist, Cavor, who invents a sort of anti-magnetic element from which they build a ship to propel them to the moon. The atmosphere, geology and composition of the moon are all complete hokum, as are the insect-like inhabitants, the Selenites. If nothing else though, this is an enjoyable adventure story and a reminder of just how fertile Wells' genius was.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tyska

    Two men make it to the moon and discover a hidden society of moon creatures beneath the surface. Supposed to be one of Wells' best but most underrated books from the time when people hadn't set foot on the Moon, yet. His stories always seem so simple to me when in fact they are rich in detail and complexity. I love how neatly he combines scientific facts with fiction and how lively the worlds are that he creates. Once again, like in most of his writings, he doesn't miss the chance to criticize hu Two men make it to the moon and discover a hidden society of moon creatures beneath the surface. Supposed to be one of Wells' best but most underrated books from the time when people hadn't set foot on the Moon, yet. His stories always seem so simple to me when in fact they are rich in detail and complexity. I love how neatly he combines scientific facts with fiction and how lively the worlds are that he creates. Once again, like in most of his writings, he doesn't miss the chance to criticize human culture, in this case war and greed.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...