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Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team

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Fans of How They Croaked: The Awful Ends of the Awfully Famous and Kid Presidents can draft their own presidential fantasy team, based on these hilarious-but-true profiles of our past leaders.   What if a zombie apocalypse or a robot uprising threatened the nation and you had the power to recruit some of the nation’s finest presidents to help save the day?   By studying th Fans of How They Croaked: The Awful Ends of the Awfully Famous and Kid Presidents can draft their own presidential fantasy team, based on these hilarious-but-true profiles of our past leaders.   What if a zombie apocalypse or a robot uprising threatened the nation and you had the power to recruit some of the nation’s finest presidents to help save the day?   By studying the most successful squads in history, Daniel O’Brien has identified the perfect ingredients for a victorious team.   Which president would you choose for: the Brain, the Brawn, the Moral Compass, the Loose Cannon, and the Roosevelt?   Choose wisely—the fate of the world is in your hands!


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Fans of How They Croaked: The Awful Ends of the Awfully Famous and Kid Presidents can draft their own presidential fantasy team, based on these hilarious-but-true profiles of our past leaders.   What if a zombie apocalypse or a robot uprising threatened the nation and you had the power to recruit some of the nation’s finest presidents to help save the day?   By studying th Fans of How They Croaked: The Awful Ends of the Awfully Famous and Kid Presidents can draft their own presidential fantasy team, based on these hilarious-but-true profiles of our past leaders.   What if a zombie apocalypse or a robot uprising threatened the nation and you had the power to recruit some of the nation’s finest presidents to help save the day?   By studying the most successful squads in history, Daniel O’Brien has identified the perfect ingredients for a victorious team.   Which president would you choose for: the Brain, the Brawn, the Moral Compass, the Loose Cannon, and the Roosevelt?   Choose wisely—the fate of the world is in your hands!

30 review for Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team

  1. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    While the children of every President are listed as stats, Jefferson's 4 children with Sally Hemings are absent. Also, confused why this dream team stops at Ronald Reagan--leaving out our last 4 presidents. While the children of every President are listed as stats, Jefferson's 4 children with Sally Hemings are absent. Also, confused why this dream team stops at Ronald Reagan--leaving out our last 4 presidents.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alia

    G This book gives me hope. Just hope. Lots of hope. So much hope. Whatever is up with the next one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book is just fun! The descriptions are fun, the illustrations are fun, and the game itself - creating a dream team of presidents - was addictive. I had post-it notes going as I read to keep track of my thoughts! With only about 4 pages per president, I can't expect it to cover everything, but there were a few omissions and debatable facts that should have been included. Facts that disqualify presidents from my dream team that weren't taken into consideration in the book. Most notably - Andr This book is just fun! The descriptions are fun, the illustrations are fun, and the game itself - creating a dream team of presidents - was addictive. I had post-it notes going as I read to keep track of my thoughts! With only about 4 pages per president, I can't expect it to cover everything, but there were a few omissions and debatable facts that should have been included. Facts that disqualify presidents from my dream team that weren't taken into consideration in the book. Most notably - Andrew Jackson: has the potential to be the perfect loose cannon, but his penchant for genocide immediately rules him out but was not mentioned in the book. Woodrow Wilson is given credit for giving women the right to vote when actually he resisted it for years, throwing women in jail for demonstrating in front of the White House. There was way too much focus on the physical prowess of presidents - perhaps that is intentional to appeal to young boy readers? And president after president was described as "weak and sickly" as a child, which says more about historical childhood mortality rates than anything else. Anyway, here's my presidential dream team: Loose Cannon - Teddy Roosevelt (he's smart and tough, but he's too much of a live wire to fill either of those roles) Brains - John Adams (Jefferson was a close second, but if we included living presidents, Obama would be in the running as well.) Moral Compass - Washington (Although I think Jimmy Carter could fill this spot, too) Brawn - Monroe (Hard to find someone who is both tough and not an asshole. Washington can take this role after Jimmy Carter takes over morality.) Roosevelt - Since I already have a Roosevelt on my team, I think this position could be used instead for either a do-er (someone like LBJ or Polk who knew how to get things done) or a leader (like Reagan or FDR or JFK who is able to rally the people behind a cause, an idea, a common dream; the public face of the team, so to speak) I realize Lincoln is conspicuously absent from my team. He's perhaps best suited for the role of Brains, but come on - Adams & Jefferson basically invented the government! And there should be a first lady on the team, too, right? There are the usual choices like Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt, of course. But then Dolley Madison was a militant hostess and Nellie Taft was a force I never even realized.

  4. 4 out of 5

    David

    The humorous anecdotes O'Brien tells makes learning about the presidents an enjoyable experience. It's a good starter piece to build upon on your journey to discovering the presidents. I only find it slightly disconcerting that I'm the only one that believes Martin Van Buren is possibly the inspiration for Bilbo Baggins. The humorous anecdotes O'Brien tells makes learning about the presidents an enjoyable experience. It's a good starter piece to build upon on your journey to discovering the presidents. I only find it slightly disconcerting that I'm the only one that believes Martin Van Buren is possibly the inspiration for Bilbo Baggins.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    In this offering from Daniel O’Brien readers are tasked with drafting their own presidential fantasy team much as you would draft a fantasy football team. The author presents five positions that need to be filled using the presidents. He then offers a chapter each for all of the deceased United States’ presidents from George Washington through Ronald Reagan. He purposefully leaves out any living presidents. In each chapter he discusses many things that were significant to their lives as well as In this offering from Daniel O’Brien readers are tasked with drafting their own presidential fantasy team much as you would draft a fantasy football team. The author presents five positions that need to be filled using the presidents. He then offers a chapter each for all of the deceased United States’ presidents from George Washington through Ronald Reagan. He purposefully leaves out any living presidents. In each chapter he discusses many things that were significant to their lives as well as presidencies while making a case as to why they should or should not be featured on your fantasy team. The concept of this book is really intriguing and fun. I can see how this would be a good way to introduce late elementary or early middle school children to the presidents. Winston Rowntree's illustrations that accompany the chapters are well done and quite humorous. These may be the best part of the book. However, while reading this book I was really torn between whether I actually liked it or not. O’Brien uses humor to grab the reader’s attention, but he also glosses over many of the important yet unflattering pieces of the presidents' lives. Some examples where the author falls flat are when he neglects to mention Thomas Jefferson’s children from his relationship with his slave on Jefferson's stat sheet, Andrew Jackson is painted as a crazy, but likable hero without once mentioning the atrocities he committed against Native Americans and when describing Washington’s success in the Revolutionary War he attributes his wins to “magic”. Magic?? Is this a non-fiction work or fiction? At some points it is hard to tell. O’Brien comes across extremely biased in his descriptions of the men and he does not stick strictly to the facts. He makes several inferences based on his own opinions and interpretations, which is obviously fine in a non-fiction work, but should be more carefully utilized when writing for readers who may be getting their first introductions to historical figures through this book. He uses some references that would most likely be lost on the target audience of this book. I do not know many elementary and middle school children that know who James Dean is for instance. At points I was laughing while reading this book, but then I would be cringing at other points. The use of humor is fine especially when trying to make a usually dull topic interesting to children, but the material should still be as accurate and unbiased as possible.

  6. 4 out of 5

    J

    Note: ARC received via Amazon Vine in exchange for review. So you want to know more about (dead) Presidents of the United States and you want the writing to be whimsical with funny anecdotes and just enough truth to be factual? Mixed with comical illustrations, too? Then Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team by Daniel O'Brien with illustrations by Winston Rowntree is your book. The book really works as an introduction. There is never much of anything that's in depth about the brief descriptions of Note: ARC received via Amazon Vine in exchange for review. So you want to know more about (dead) Presidents of the United States and you want the writing to be whimsical with funny anecdotes and just enough truth to be factual? Mixed with comical illustrations, too? Then Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team by Daniel O'Brien with illustrations by Winston Rowntree is your book. The book really works as an introduction. There is never much of anything that's in depth about the brief descriptions of the various (dead) President's lives. Thankfully the book reads like O'Brien did his research and he includes a number of helpful resources of various types to back it up. Unfortunately he has some very obvious biases which can be humorous but sometimes end up a little grating. You're not getting a whole picture of any individual from this book. But, as a way of introducing the topic to middle grade and high school readers who may not be interested, Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team has the potential to make them interested. Fun but lacks depth. More of a starting point than anything in regard to discussing the lives of the presidents who are no longer among the living.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The premise of this book - which of our dead Presidents would you bring back to life to fight off the robot apocalypse - seems ridiculous, but it's actually a really fun way to look at our country's Presidents. I laughed a lot and I even learned some new things, like what an underrated President Polk was, or just ill of health Woodrow Wilson was. I kept constantly pointing out parts of this book to whoever was close by. Sure it's written to grab the attention of middle-school boys, but this 30-s The premise of this book - which of our dead Presidents would you bring back to life to fight off the robot apocalypse - seems ridiculous, but it's actually a really fun way to look at our country's Presidents. I laughed a lot and I even learned some new things, like what an underrated President Polk was, or just ill of health Woodrow Wilson was. I kept constantly pointing out parts of this book to whoever was close by. Sure it's written to grab the attention of middle-school boys, but this 30-something mom was entranced. Great for history noobs and know-it-alls.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kaila

    Favorite excerpt: "It could be argued that Wilson was from a different time, but it could also be argued that so was Lincoln, you racist jerk." Favorite excerpt: "It could be argued that Wilson was from a different time, but it could also be argued that so was Lincoln, you racist jerk."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Falduto

    This is, allegedly, a book for kids--although I'm not sure what kids Daniel O'Brien hangs out with that he thinks they will get his "Ocean's 11" reference. Regardless, this a great history book about all of our non-living presidents, and which ones you would want on your "fantasy dream team" as your brains, brawn, moral compass, loose cannon, and Roosevelt (really only a couple of choices there). O'Brien manages to fit in historical fact as well as interesting trivia about each president, in sho This is, allegedly, a book for kids--although I'm not sure what kids Daniel O'Brien hangs out with that he thinks they will get his "Ocean's 11" reference. Regardless, this a great history book about all of our non-living presidents, and which ones you would want on your "fantasy dream team" as your brains, brawn, moral compass, loose cannon, and Roosevelt (really only a couple of choices there). O'Brien manages to fit in historical fact as well as interesting trivia about each president, in short vignettes. I also learned that we have had other presidents who really just wanted to be president for the money and prestige, and who spent their way through decorating the white house in a lavish fashion even during economic recessions...so....although the current administration seems so out of place, it's really in keeping with a tradition of crummy presidents.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This book was written by a guy from Cracked, and it shows. Not necessarily in a bad way, it just shows. Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team posits that some awful event, such as a robot uprising (probably caused by Martin Van Buren), has occurred, and you, yes you, the reader, must put together a team of dead presidents to defeat the evil. O'Brien then outlines the presidents' lives and time in office with an eye to their suitability as a member of your team. There are five slots: the Brain, the This book was written by a guy from Cracked, and it shows. Not necessarily in a bad way, it just shows. Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team posits that some awful event, such as a robot uprising (probably caused by Martin Van Buren), has occurred, and you, yes you, the reader, must put together a team of dead presidents to defeat the evil. O'Brien then outlines the presidents' lives and time in office with an eye to their suitability as a member of your team. There are five slots: the Brain, the Brawn, the Moral Compass, the Loose Cannon, and the Roosevelt. The book does tend to sacrifice accuracy in favor of hilarity, and it also doesn't mention a lot of the more horrible things that the presidents have done, like the tiny fact that Andrew Jackson committed genocide. You know. Small things like that. However, it is intensely funny and I have a place in my heart for that. It's the kind of book I'd give to a fifth or sixth-grader who's started to get bored with history, because boy howdy will this fix that. O'Brien also doesn't cover the last few presidents, but he mentions that's because they're still alive, and I can't blame him for maybe wanting to skip a lawsuit. Also, for the record, my lineup: The Brain: John Adams. Quick, act shocked. The Brawn: Teddy Roosevelt. I'm a fan. The Moral Compass: Abe Lincoln. Can't really go wrong there. The Loose Cannon: James Madison. Surprisingly off-the-rails! The Roosevelt: Franklin Roosevelt. I mean, there's only two.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Both my nine year old son and I think this is the best book we have ever read about presidents. Only one of us has a real frame of reference, but he loves it so I won't point that out. Fun and funny, it's full of the kind of fun facts that make people fall in love with history. Spoiler: Ronald Reagan is considerd the "Wolverine" of presidents. Discuss amongst yourselves. Recommend if you like: one or more presidents, fun facts, people who agree with me that Warren G. Harding was a crappy presiden Both my nine year old son and I think this is the best book we have ever read about presidents. Only one of us has a real frame of reference, but he loves it so I won't point that out. Fun and funny, it's full of the kind of fun facts that make people fall in love with history. Spoiler: Ronald Reagan is considerd the "Wolverine" of presidents. Discuss amongst yourselves. Recommend if you like: one or more presidents, fun facts, people who agree with me that Warren G. Harding was a crappy president, or you have a sense of humor.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This was very disappointing... This book was a retelling of Mr. O'Brien's first book, How to Fight Presidents. This was very disappointing... This book was a retelling of Mr. O'Brien's first book, How to Fight Presidents.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Lennon

    I love books about presidents, and this one is all about the cool and really not cool stuff they did. It’s the Doris Kearns Goodwin comic book edition.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Abraham Ray

    Great young adults book about the presidents up to & including Ronald Reagan!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Though some points there are personally biased, I do believe that this was the most comical and endearing form of presidential education that I've ever encountered. Though some points there are personally biased, I do believe that this was the most comical and endearing form of presidential education that I've ever encountered.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I learned many things about the Presidents. Some were weird. Many were ok. Some were useful. Had me laughing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Celeste_pewter

    Learning about the former presidents of the United States, is a fun rite of passage for any young elementary school student. While I learned about the presidents through the memorization of songs - e.g. the Animaics song. - thanks to Random House, I now have a better, go-to literary option for all the young students in my life. In Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team, author Daniel O'Brien hilariously introduces us to our first thirty-nine presidents, dissecting their legacies and comparing thei Learning about the former presidents of the United States, is a fun rite of passage for any young elementary school student. While I learned about the presidents through the memorization of songs - e.g. the Animaics song. - thanks to Random House, I now have a better, go-to literary option for all the young students in my life. In Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team, author Daniel O'Brien hilariously introduces us to our first thirty-nine presidents, dissecting their legacies and comparing their capabilities for surviving in a fight and/or zombie apocalypse. Each president is introduced WFF-style, with stats, move breakdowns and special background. O'Brien isn't afraid of sharing snarky, ridiculous history facts that definitely wouldn't make it in your standard history book. (Seriously, some of the entries had me laughing out lout in delighted disbelief, at how semi-saucy the facts were.) It's the type of writing that will absolutely delight kids simply by virtue of the fact that it feels verboten to some degree; and I can easily imagine this book appealing to reluctant readers of any age. Add in the fact that WInston Rowntree has done a spectacular job with Wall Street Journal-esque pencil drawings that depict each of the presidents as superheroes, and readers will absolutely feel their imaginations sore. My one disappointment with the book? That O'Brien hasn't covered anyone beyond Reagan. But I can only hope that this means that we have another installment to come. Bottom line: Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team ​is a fun, snarky introduction to our presidents, and the perfect gift for any reluctant reader.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book, y'all. I'm a big fan of Cracked, so when I saw it was by one of their writers, I knew I'd like the humor. But, so often, history books for kids are written so simply, or even written down to them, that it can't be fun for them, and it certainly wouldn't be fun for me. Perhaps you can tell by the title, but Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team is not one of those books! That's what works so well about it, too. It's laugh-out-loud funny for me, but it'll also be laugh-out-loud funny for This book, y'all. I'm a big fan of Cracked, so when I saw it was by one of their writers, I knew I'd like the humor. But, so often, history books for kids are written so simply, or even written down to them, that it can't be fun for them, and it certainly wouldn't be fun for me. Perhaps you can tell by the title, but Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team is not one of those books! That's what works so well about it, too. It's laugh-out-loud funny for me, but it'll also be laugh-out-loud funny for kids. I also learned some stuff! A lot of the presidential facts were things I'd heard before, but there were many I hadn't heard. I mean, did you know John F. Kennedy was plagued by physical problems? I didn't! The other huge, wonderful parts of the book are the illustrations. They're so original and different, while also highlighting the fun points and jokes O'Brien is making in the text. It's so fun to look at all the details. The tone of the writing is perfect, too. It's conversational and comfortable, but, like I said, doesn't talk down at all. A kid would have so much fun trying to figure out which presidents they're going to put in their team--and it would be a hard decision! You think it's easy, until you read about some of the more obscure presidents who were actually pretty great. You've gotten it, right? Your Presidential Fantasy Dream Team is pretty much awesome. I don't care if you like presidents, but you'll be into them by the end of this, kid or not. You can find this review and many more fun things on my blog: Paper Cuts.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katie Kemple

    What if the nation was on the verge of a zombie apocalypse and you had to choose a dream-team of five dead presidents to rescue the nation? That’s the approach O’Brien brings to his delightfully original introduction to U.S. presidents, accompanied by Rowntree’s muscle-popping superhero illustrations of the nation’s first thirty-nine leaders. Readers will discover what Franklin Delano Roosevelt has in common with Iron Man; how Herbert Hoover was the “Rambo” of presidents; and that underneath it What if the nation was on the verge of a zombie apocalypse and you had to choose a dream-team of five dead presidents to rescue the nation? That’s the approach O’Brien brings to his delightfully original introduction to U.S. presidents, accompanied by Rowntree’s muscle-popping superhero illustrations of the nation’s first thirty-nine leaders. Readers will discover what Franklin Delano Roosevelt has in common with Iron Man; how Herbert Hoover was the “Rambo” of presidents; and that underneath it all, Ronald Reagan may actually have been Wolverine. Plus: was Woodrow Wilson our first zombie president? O’Brien opens each chapter with a president’s stats: length of term, political party, spouse(s), children, birthdate, death date, and a fun fact. There’s also a catchy headline for each president: James Madison is “the tiny nightmare,” Abraham Lincoln is “our mutant president,” and Calvin Coolidge is “the silent killer.” Each chapter ends with O’Brien recommending whether to add a president to your “fantasy dream team” in one or more of five categories: brain, brawn, loose cannon, moral compass or Roosevelt. It’s an amusing matrix to view each president’s strengths and weaknesses. The book concludes with robust recommendations for additional books and websites. The writing’s sharp, conversational and fully engaging. Young and old readers will enjoy seeing the Presidents through O’Brien and Rowntree’s eyes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Iowa City Public Library

    From Morgan: "The premise is outlandish, if you were a time traveler required to form a squad of amazing former presidents to set a catastrophic future right, who would make your team? You may only choose from deceased presidents, as living presidents could still do something great or terrible to affect history’s view of them. Pick your candidates to fill these five spots: Brains, Brawn, Loose Cannon, Moral Compass, and Roosevelt. O’Brien provides brief but quirky overviews of each president’s li From Morgan: "The premise is outlandish, if you were a time traveler required to form a squad of amazing former presidents to set a catastrophic future right, who would make your team? You may only choose from deceased presidents, as living presidents could still do something great or terrible to affect history’s view of them. Pick your candidates to fill these five spots: Brains, Brawn, Loose Cannon, Moral Compass, and Roosevelt. O’Brien provides brief but quirky overviews of each president’s life, presidency, and team qualifications."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    PRETTY sure - like 100% sure - this is a kids' version of How to Fight Presidents, which was super profane but a gigantic fave at our house. Only goes up to Reagan, which is a disappointment - I'd love to see where either Bush scores on the badassery scale. And he makes kind of a big deal out of "this is the history the grownups have been keeping from you," and mentions things like Kennedy's infidelity and Grover Cleveland's probable illegitimate child, but Sally Hemings? Does not show up. PRETTY sure - like 100% sure - this is a kids' version of How to Fight Presidents, which was super profane but a gigantic fave at our house. Only goes up to Reagan, which is a disappointment - I'd love to see where either Bush scores on the badassery scale. And he makes kind of a big deal out of "this is the history the grownups have been keeping from you," and mentions things like Kennedy's infidelity and Grover Cleveland's probable illegitimate child, but Sally Hemings? Does not show up.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Linda Laldinpuii

    As a child's first semi serious introduction to the Presidents of America, it does a decent job. However because of its humorous tone and omission of the darker facts, it may not be the best choice for those who wanted a more in depth look at the Presidents. It is aimed for kids so the light hearted tone is understandable. As an adult though, you might not find it that amusing or engaging. As a child's first semi serious introduction to the Presidents of America, it does a decent job. However because of its humorous tone and omission of the darker facts, it may not be the best choice for those who wanted a more in depth look at the Presidents. It is aimed for kids so the light hearted tone is understandable. As an adult though, you might not find it that amusing or engaging.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Thom

    Probably for a narrow audience, but I'm it! Love the presidents and love playing fantasy baseball and strategy games. Delightful sense of humor and some great tidbits to throw in for my history class once in a while. Probably for a narrow audience, but I'm it! Love the presidents and love playing fantasy baseball and strategy games. Delightful sense of humor and some great tidbits to throw in for my history class once in a while.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    The ideal audience for this book is probably "teens who are already kind of into the presidents." For anybody else, it would either be too much or too little. For me, it was amusing but not hysterical. I did appreciate the no-holds-barred Richard-Nixon-was-by-all-standards-the-WORST take. The ideal audience for this book is probably "teens who are already kind of into the presidents." For anybody else, it would either be too much or too little. For me, it was amusing but not hysterical. I did appreciate the no-holds-barred Richard-Nixon-was-by-all-standards-the-WORST take.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    This book was a lot of fun. The author provides facts about each president (nonliving) with a big dose of humor for the purpose of creating a fantasy dream team. A lot more interesting and fun than most biographies! An excellent supplement to the curriculum and also to read just for fun!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason Roland

    Loved, loved this book. Hilarious and educational. I got it for my middle schooler but read it first. Burned through it in a little over one day

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    I've given this book give stars because it provides brief historical notes about each president, but in a hilarious manor. It's a quick read as well. I've given this book give stars because it provides brief historical notes about each president, but in a hilarious manor. It's a quick read as well.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rusty

  30. 4 out of 5

    Davit Karapetyan

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