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Eu, Wolverine

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Das páginas de Fabulosos X-Men surge a primeira série solo de Wolverine! Viajando ao Japão para encontrar seu verdadeiro amor, Mariko, Wolverine descobre que ela se casou com outro homem a fim de pagar as dívidas de seu pai. Furioso pela traição, o mutante descarrega sua raiva contra a organização Tentáculo e ganha uma nova aliada na forma da ronin louca por combate Yukio. Das páginas de Fabulosos X-Men surge a primeira série solo de Wolverine! Viajando ao Japão para encontrar seu verdadeiro amor, Mariko, Wolverine descobre que ela se casou com outro homem a fim de pagar as dívidas de seu pai. Furioso pela traição, o mutante descarrega sua raiva contra a organização Tentáculo e ganha uma nova aliada na forma da ronin louca por combate Yukio. Este volume reúne as edições 1-4 de Wolverine.


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Das páginas de Fabulosos X-Men surge a primeira série solo de Wolverine! Viajando ao Japão para encontrar seu verdadeiro amor, Mariko, Wolverine descobre que ela se casou com outro homem a fim de pagar as dívidas de seu pai. Furioso pela traição, o mutante descarrega sua raiva contra a organização Tentáculo e ganha uma nova aliada na forma da ronin louca por combate Yukio. Das páginas de Fabulosos X-Men surge a primeira série solo de Wolverine! Viajando ao Japão para encontrar seu verdadeiro amor, Mariko, Wolverine descobre que ela se casou com outro homem a fim de pagar as dívidas de seu pai. Furioso pela traição, o mutante descarrega sua raiva contra a organização Tentáculo e ganha uma nova aliada na forma da ronin louca por combate Yukio. Este volume reúne as edições 1-4 de Wolverine.

30 review for Eu, Wolverine

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    I had an itch to revisit this one since the latest film version of Logan’s adventures, The Wolverine, is inspired by and loosely based on it. (Check out my review of the movie on Shelf Inflicted.) While Logan is off in the wilderness dealing with a rogue grizzly and some dumb-ass hunters, his girlfriend Mariko returns to Japan with no explanation. Logan follows her to Tokyo where he is shocked to learn that Mariko’s missing father Shingen has returned and set up an arranged marriage for her which I had an itch to revisit this one since the latest film version of Logan’s adventures, The Wolverine, is inspired by and loosely based on it. (Check out my review of the movie on Shelf Inflicted.) While Logan is off in the wilderness dealing with a rogue grizzly and some dumb-ass hunters, his girlfriend Mariko returns to Japan with no explanation. Logan follows her to Tokyo where he is shocked to learn that Mariko’s missing father Shingen has returned and set up an arranged marriage for her which she was honor bound to go through with. When Logan goes to see her, Shingen tricks him dishonoring himself in front of Mariko and nearly kills him in the process. Ashamed and heartsick, Logan finds himself in a rebound relationship with a female assassin named Yukio who is being pursued by a gang of deadly ninjas called The Hand. Logan tries to get a crime lord off Yukio’s back without realizing that he’s still caught up in a scheme of Shingen’s. The legend goes that Chris Claremont and Frank Miller had a long car ride together when traveling to some event, and the two cooked up a story that would broaden the character of a mutant Canadian ex-secret agent turned X-Men with a bloodlust and a bad attitude into something more. This mini-series helped Wolverine go from being a minor supporting player as a bloodthirsty X-Man to one of the most popular (and overexposed) members of the Marvel universe. The story holds up pretty well for being over 30 years old at this point and while some of the cheesy tough guy exposition that Logan spouts seems like it came from a bad detective novel at times, there’s a lot of moments here that would become iconic for the character including his oft quoted line, “I’m the best there is at what I do, but what I do isn’t very nice.”

  2. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This one has to be considered in historical context, not just for what it is. The words "iconic" and "classic" are -way- overused, especially when it comes to the world of comics, but they both really apply to this one. It's one of the earliest attempts to tell a mature story for adults in graphic form. It was originally published as four individual issues in 1982, when the majority of the reading public dismissed all such publications as "funny books" intended for children who weren't yet advan This one has to be considered in historical context, not just for what it is. The words "iconic" and "classic" are -way- overused, especially when it comes to the world of comics, but they both really apply to this one. It's one of the earliest attempts to tell a mature story for adults in graphic form. It was originally published as four individual issues in 1982, when the majority of the reading public dismissed all such publications as "funny books" intended for children who weren't yet advanced enough in intelligence or intellectual sophistication for Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys. Miller's art is among his very best work, with interesting variations of traditional layout, and the script does not play down to the reader at all. It's a little tedious when Logan has to be introduced at the beginning of each section, and it would be more effective if he weren't wearing his fighting uniform all the time, but, again, compared to the other books that were on the stands at the time it's way, way above the rest. The book contains an afterword by Frank Miller and an introduction by Chris Claremont both written in early 1987 that are intelligent and heartfelt explanations of what they were trying to accomplish. It's good to know they got to see how well they succeeded! If the folks who did the film had stuck to Claremont's script more closely they would have had a much better film.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

    I'd like to start off by saying that over all this is really a four star book, but it does suffer from some flaws. First the good stuff. Chris Claremont and Frank Miller are great in this. The writing is for the most part excellent and tells story that is, aside from the retractable claws and healing factor, crime thriller/drama. Its dark, gritty, and really develops the character of Logan/Wolverine. Miller does a great job penciling this shadowy yet colorful world with a sense of movement and li I'd like to start off by saying that over all this is really a four star book, but it does suffer from some flaws. First the good stuff. Chris Claremont and Frank Miller are great in this. The writing is for the most part excellent and tells story that is, aside from the retractable claws and healing factor, crime thriller/drama. Its dark, gritty, and really develops the character of Logan/Wolverine. Miller does a great job penciling this shadowy yet colorful world with a sense of movement and life we know he does well. The art and writing immerse us in this part of Logan/Wolverine's life that we don't always get to see and its a great story. I actually want to read the comics that come after (if they exist) showing the wedding. Now for the bad. This is a collection of comics, and each one is written that way. So you are treated to very redundant descriptions of who wolverine is and what he can do and how he's the best at it. I understand practically why this was done, so that anyone reading issue two or three wouldn't be lost, but that isn't an excuse for bad writing more of an explanation. If I was reading a comic today that do that issue after issue I'd stop reading it. Same thing with a tv show too, demand some intelligence from your audience and use some skill in writing to give me plot exposition with out spoon feeding it to me via paragraphs of stuff from the narrator. That is really the only flaw I find in the book. Unfortunately its a pretty persistent flaw that drags the rating toward the middle and away from the excellent. I bought this book from a brick and mortar book store, and I advise you to support them and do the same. And if you can't do that, at least order it online from a real person or an online retailer that does also have brick and mortar locations. Ideally, you should buy this from a comic store.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Checkman

    Wolverine in modern Japan fighting Ninjas, kicking ass and taking names. In between he drinks beer, feels sorry for himself(but gets over all that wussy cry baby garbage pretty quickly) and talks like a bad imitation of Mike Hammer. That's pretty much it. It's not exactly deep material, but it works. I've owned my copy (complication) since 1988. Still thumb through it now and again. Not a bad way to spend one's time. That is my entire review. Exactly how much can one say about a violent fantasy Wolverine in modern Japan fighting Ninjas, kicking ass and taking names. In between he drinks beer, feels sorry for himself(but gets over all that wussy cry baby garbage pretty quickly) and talks like a bad imitation of Mike Hammer. That's pretty much it. It's not exactly deep material, but it works. I've owned my copy (complication) since 1988. Still thumb through it now and again. Not a bad way to spend one's time. That is my entire review. Exactly how much can one say about a violent fantasy story written for the young and young at heart?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    It is tough to read this objectively after decades of stories have been added to the Wolverine "mythos" (if I may be so overblown as to call it such). I suppose, at the time of its publication, Chris Claremont's Wolverine was a dive deep into uncharted territory: Wolverine was previously a mysterious figure, and this was, so I gather, the first look at the motivations of the character...so, at the time it was probably quite provocative and illuminating. However, it doesn't really age well. Wolver It is tough to read this objectively after decades of stories have been added to the Wolverine "mythos" (if I may be so overblown as to call it such). I suppose, at the time of its publication, Chris Claremont's Wolverine was a dive deep into uncharted territory: Wolverine was previously a mysterious figure, and this was, so I gather, the first look at the motivations of the character...so, at the time it was probably quite provocative and illuminating. However, it doesn't really age well. Wolverine's ham-handed musings of "I do bad things...i'm as tough as they come" are cringe-inducing...and coupled with this early-style Frank Miller artwork that just seems awkward (in a "not yet developed his signature style and is still kind of stuck in a Neal Adams uncanny valley" kind of way), it's a fairly mediocre read. Fun, yes, but mediocre. And, well, that's more than I would have imagined I would write about a 90-page comic featuring a guy with claws fighting ninjas.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Nice mini series for this X-Men character. Good story and art. This was the first spin off Wolverine story i read and it still today defines the character to me. Very Recommended

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    To be honest, I've always preferred Wolverine as part of the X-Men but here, in what was his first limited series, Chris Claremont proved that Logan could hold his own. Claremont puts to shame the majority of current-day comic writers. His prose are good, he has a firm grasp on the personalities of the characters (indeed, he single handedly defined Logan as a person during his historic run on the X-Men), he strikes a balance between action and exposition (which in comics is definitely not 50-50) To be honest, I've always preferred Wolverine as part of the X-Men but here, in what was his first limited series, Chris Claremont proved that Logan could hold his own. Claremont puts to shame the majority of current-day comic writers. His prose are good, he has a firm grasp on the personalities of the characters (indeed, he single handedly defined Logan as a person during his historic run on the X-Men), he strikes a balance between action and exposition (which in comics is definitely not 50-50), and came up with an interesting story that was worthy of being handled in its own series instead of being just a run of a few issues in Wolvie's regular team book. In other words, it's a story that actually deserved to be told. Claremont also remembers Stan Lee's golden rule: every comic is someone's first comic (a rule that is all too often forgotten, or simply ignored in modern comics). Each issue in this collection starts with a very brief recap of what went before and Claremont catches a reader up on anything he may have missed in a matter of sentences without bogging down the action. The current trend of "writing for the trades" does nothing to help new readers break into a story and current writers would do well to adopt this approach if they wish to grow their audience. Frank Miller's pencils are very good. Miller was never on a par with masters such as John Byrne, Michael Golden, or (later) Jim Lee but his line work at the time was evocative, stylized, and bordered on the impressionistic. There are times in this volume where Josef Rubinstein's inks seem to be a little too finished for Miller's pencils, though I can't know for certain that Frank wasn't trying for more realism and got a little wonky doing so. This is one of the few comics I've read recently that made me want to read it again as soon as I closed its covers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    This was just spectacular! This book was so well written and entertaining i read the whole thing in, just one sitting! This book takes place when Wolverines girlfriend Mariko leaves without a word, he goes to Japan and finds that she has been forced into a arranged marriage by her father who is the leader of The Hand, an elite group of ninja assassins! I could not recommend this book enough!

  9. 4 out of 5

    KayeC Jones

    I went down to four stars on this only for the reason of its redundancy problem before each installment. Yes, we all know the deal with Wolverine. He's practically invincible, please don't repeat it every stinkin' time. It begins to look like story filler after a while. Other than that, the story is amazing and the art is great. I went down to four stars on this only for the reason of its redundancy problem before each installment. Yes, we all know the deal with Wolverine. He's practically invincible, please don't repeat it every stinkin' time. It begins to look like story filler after a while. Other than that, the story is amazing and the art is great.

  10. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Overall an enjoyable installment in the story of Wolverine. This is definitely not to be missed if you're a fan of the Wolverine as this story features several key characters and important plot elements. Overall an enjoyable installment in the story of Wolverine. This is definitely not to be missed if you're a fan of the Wolverine as this story features several key characters and important plot elements.

  11. 5 out of 5

    c wylie misselhorn

    Ninjas, death & love... an Eastern romance.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jakub

    A nice angle to a known character. Known and liked art style, some typical Logan behavior and good pace.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amparbs

    Loved this love story and so glad it ended how it should have with Logan and Mariko together!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Don

    look consider that the actual comics came out in 1982 folks. also consider the crap DC was slogging. Hello Frank Miller! Miller's art made this just awesome - i bought a couple issues off the newsstand in said 1982 ( I was 12)! There were zero comic shops sorry kiddos! I had read miller's Daredevil work ( Daredevil 181!!!!!) . Claremont as a writer was near his peak -- the Morlocks, Hellfire club, introduction of Rogue etc.. were the storylines in the x-men. oh right, that was the only x-men boo look consider that the actual comics came out in 1982 folks. also consider the crap DC was slogging. Hello Frank Miller! Miller's art made this just awesome - i bought a couple issues off the newsstand in said 1982 ( I was 12)! There were zero comic shops sorry kiddos! I had read miller's Daredevil work ( Daredevil 181!!!!!) . Claremont as a writer was near his peak -- the Morlocks, Hellfire club, introduction of Rogue etc.. were the storylines in the x-men. oh right, that was the only x-men book then - the Uncanny X-men -- well maybe the New Mutants debuted in December that year idk. oH and there were no DC or Marvel graphic novels. So kiddo who I have socks older than you, might consider this series as ground breaking and your whiny bs isn't appreciated.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marion

    It's really annoying how in every issue (4 in this) they have to repeat "I am Wolverine. I am a mutant. I heal fast. My skeleton is made of adamantium". WE KNOW! Say it once at the beginning of the run, and once more in the middle if it's a very long run, but this one was 4 issues, it's really unnecessary to repeat those facts at the beginning of every issue. It's really annoying how in every issue (4 in this) they have to repeat "I am Wolverine. I am a mutant. I heal fast. My skeleton is made of adamantium". WE KNOW! Say it once at the beginning of the run, and once more in the middle if it's a very long run, but this one was 4 issues, it's really unnecessary to repeat those facts at the beginning of every issue.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Gentry

    Frank Millers art is so great, theres just something about it that makes you wanna look over each panel again and again. Honestly the story is sub par and would have been a 3 star with any other artist.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kalio

    My first wolverine comic. I was lucky to get the physical version with its first translation into Spanish. The drawing style is beautiful, nowadays the digital use is too noticeable, it's not a bad thing, it's just different. A must read if u love Wolverine. My first wolverine comic. I was lucky to get the physical version with its first translation into Spanish. The drawing style is beautiful, nowadays the digital use is too noticeable, it's not a bad thing, it's just different. A must read if u love Wolverine.

  18. 4 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    Second printing

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chaitanya

    Decent read. Not Chris/Frank's best work. Artwork was fun. But, lags a bit and redundant at places. Mediocre--3/5! Decent read. Not Chris/Frank's best work. Artwork was fun. But, lags a bit and redundant at places. Mediocre--3/5!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    This edition collects the 4 issue mini-series by Chris Claremont & Frank Miller which alledges to strip Wolverine down to his adamantine skeleton and then rebuilds him as a much more complicated character than just a psycho who succumbs to berserker rages as a rationalization to kill. The effectiveness of how well they achieved their goal is certainly arguable, but this still holds as an enjoyable read. This was the era when Claremont was very comfortable with his writing style and was readily s This edition collects the 4 issue mini-series by Chris Claremont & Frank Miller which alledges to strip Wolverine down to his adamantine skeleton and then rebuilds him as a much more complicated character than just a psycho who succumbs to berserker rages as a rationalization to kill. The effectiveness of how well they achieved their goal is certainly arguable, but this still holds as an enjoyable read. This was the era when Claremont was very comfortable with his writing style and was readily stretching himself in attempting to expand the comics medium, in later years Claremont would rest on his laurels and be less of a creative force and more of a pillar of the industry. Miller was at the peak of his creativity at Marvel and while this series is not as groundbreaking as much of his other work, it still holds as among his better work for the company.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Googz

    The 10th of July is just an approximation for when I read this. I read it cover to cover at work one day, as borrowed from Sean. It was pretty good! I read someplace that the new THE WOLVERINE movie was based on it, but beyond taking place in Japan there wasn't a whole lot of similarity. I'm surprised I hadn't read this one yet, considering I collected the Wolverine comics somewhat regularly for a short spell back in the early- to mid-1990s. Pretty awesome that SPOILER ALERT, Wolverine gets beat The 10th of July is just an approximation for when I read this. I read it cover to cover at work one day, as borrowed from Sean. It was pretty good! I read someplace that the new THE WOLVERINE movie was based on it, but beyond taking place in Japan there wasn't a whole lot of similarity. I'm surprised I hadn't read this one yet, considering I collected the Wolverine comics somewhat regularly for a short spell back in the early- to mid-1990s. Pretty awesome that SPOILER ALERT, Wolverine gets beaten up by a samurai just using a wooden sword. Some of the familiar tropes and popular quotes of the Wolverine character were established herein, as I understand it. Definitely worth pickin' up to check out real quick.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Trey Piepmeier

    This was entertaining, and I'm sure it was great in the context of the time in which it was released, but there's really not much to it. There's tons of rehash of who Wolverine is and what his powers are since I guess he was still a relatively new character. One thing I can say for this TPB is that I love the quality of paper in it. It's like high quality, thick pulp. I wish all old comics that got re-released came out with paper that was appropriate for the original art. It's all about the color This was entertaining, and I'm sure it was great in the context of the time in which it was released, but there's really not much to it. There's tons of rehash of who Wolverine is and what his powers are since I guess he was still a relatively new character. One thing I can say for this TPB is that I love the quality of paper in it. It's like high quality, thick pulp. I wish all old comics that got re-released came out with paper that was appropriate for the original art. It's all about the color. When they recolor old comics I think they remove some of its soul. This book is supposedly what the new movie is based on, but from the trailers, I don't see how.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Yes, I realize that this story is, at times, shit and that putting Wolverine in a love triangle doesn't seem that engaging, but damn, is this work good. In fact, this work, has to rank as one of my most enjoyable comic reading experiences ever. To me, a great comic fully engages you in the story, even if that story seems non-sensical and, at times, far fetched. However, Woverine by Claremont and Miller emblazoned my imagination and interest from start to finish, and, at the end of the day, isn't t Yes, I realize that this story is, at times, shit and that putting Wolverine in a love triangle doesn't seem that engaging, but damn, is this work good. In fact, this work, has to rank as one of my most enjoyable comic reading experiences ever. To me, a great comic fully engages you in the story, even if that story seems non-sensical and, at times, far fetched. However, Woverine by Claremont and Miller emblazoned my imagination and interest from start to finish, and, at the end of the day, isn't that what comics are supposed to do?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elina

    I love, love, love Wolverine. He is a magnificent character. This story, however, is not very good. The style is nice, and the beginning with the bear is ok, but after Wolverine flies to Japan, the story gets rather boring. I have to say that the film adaptation (The Wolverine) didn't do any justice to the story, but there was something missing... Maybe it was because I read the Finnish translation, or maybe it was because Wolverine's love story with Mariko is not very believable. Whatever the r I love, love, love Wolverine. He is a magnificent character. This story, however, is not very good. The style is nice, and the beginning with the bear is ok, but after Wolverine flies to Japan, the story gets rather boring. I have to say that the film adaptation (The Wolverine) didn't do any justice to the story, but there was something missing... Maybe it was because I read the Finnish translation, or maybe it was because Wolverine's love story with Mariko is not very believable. Whatever the reason, I prefer Wolverine interacting with other X-Men.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alger

    The story was pretty good, not spectacular. But all in all it had a really solid plot that evolved and adequately portrayed Logan as the complex character he is. I'm giving it four stars because Frank Miller's work "really tied the room together." The ending seemed implausible, but since its a miniseries, I don't see the harm in giving Logan a little bit of slack. I liked it. The story was pretty good, not spectacular. But all in all it had a really solid plot that evolved and adequately portrayed Logan as the complex character he is. I'm giving it four stars because Frank Miller's work "really tied the room together." The ending seemed implausible, but since its a miniseries, I don't see the harm in giving Logan a little bit of slack. I liked it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Glenn

    Back in 1990, Claremont and Miller did an awesome job of redefining the Wolverine character from psychotic killer to "failed Samurai." He is recast as an honorable masterless warrior who's gotten the short end of the stick more than a few times. Trying to find his way in the world, he's a man with few regrets and even less compunction about killing. Good stuff. Back in 1990, Claremont and Miller did an awesome job of redefining the Wolverine character from psychotic killer to "failed Samurai." He is recast as an honorable masterless warrior who's gotten the short end of the stick more than a few times. Trying to find his way in the world, he's a man with few regrets and even less compunction about killing. Good stuff.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Given, the recent "The Wolverine" trailer which is loosely based on this book, I re read this yesterday. It is still amazing, Chris Claremont and Frank Miller created one of my favorite Wolverine stories (Another being "Old Man Logan" which is also said to be an inspiration.). I highly recommend it. Given, the recent "The Wolverine" trailer which is loosely based on this book, I re read this yesterday. It is still amazing, Chris Claremont and Frank Miller created one of my favorite Wolverine stories (Another being "Old Man Logan" which is also said to be an inspiration.). I highly recommend it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    This book isn't bad; Chris Claremont and Frank Miller are both operating here at the peak of their powers, before their stylistic tics got the better of them and sank their work into self parody. That being said, it's not for me; I simply don't like Wolverine enough as a character to care about him and there aren't enough other characters in this volume to win me over. This book isn't bad; Chris Claremont and Frank Miller are both operating here at the peak of their powers, before their stylistic tics got the better of them and sank their work into self parody. That being said, it's not for me; I simply don't like Wolverine enough as a character to care about him and there aren't enough other characters in this volume to win me over.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jarlos

    a supposed classic, i just read this for the first time and it certainly lives up to the hype. a smart take on Wolverine, predating Origin as one of the first mini-series to take that character more seriously. the old Miller art is great. classic story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beau Johnston

    More fun than the movie (by the same name)..... ok, just as much fun as the movie. If you want to know a little more about what makes Wolverine tick, open the cover and take a journey into his inner thoughts.

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