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Complete Works Of Oscar Wilde: Golden Illustrated Classics (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books

30 review for Complete Works Of Oscar Wilde: Golden Illustrated Classics (Comes with a Free Audiobook)

  1. 4 out of 5

    leynes

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SON! YOU DID WELL! ♥ Almost three years and 1,270 pages later I'm finally marking this as read, what a surreal feeling. I cannot believe that I have read every single word of Oscar's published writing. I know, they're are still many private letters left for me to discover but, you guys, I did it. I am proud of myself and I am proud of my trash son. I don't think I'll ever love an author as much as I love Oscar. Here's to the man who believed when he died that his name would be tox HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SON! YOU DID WELL! ♥ Almost three years and 1,270 pages later I'm finally marking this as read, what a surreal feeling. I cannot believe that I have read every single word of Oscar's published writing. I know, they're are still many private letters left for me to discover but, you guys, I did it. I am proud of myself and I am proud of my trash son. I don't think I'll ever love an author as much as I love Oscar. Here's to the man who believed when he died that his name would be toxic for generations to come. For hundreds of years his works wouldn't be read. He would stand for nothing but perversion; utter disgust of a society that couldn't bear people like him. Oh, how wrong you were, my darling child. You're still one of the most read authors in the 21th century and we all love and appreciate you very much. They even had to lock up your sarcophagus because people wouldn't stop kissing it. I wish I could wake you up for five minutes to tell you that, then you could go back to sleep again. <3 And because I am a good hoe and gracious queen I will leave you with all of my individual reviews: STORIES
 • A House of Pomegranates • The Happy Prince and Other Tales • Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime • The Canterville Ghost • The Picture of Dorian Gray PLAYS 
• Vera: or, The Nihilists • The Duchess of Padua • Salomé • A Woman of No Importance • Lady Windermere’s Fan • An Ideal Husband • The Importance of Being Earnest • A Florentine Tragedy • La Sainte Courtisane
 POEMS
 • The Collected Poems of Oscar Wilde • The Ballad of Reading Goal 
ESSAYS, SELECTED JOURNALISM, LECTURES AND LETTERS • The Rise of Historical Criticism • The Critic as Artist • Pen, Pencil and Poison • The Truth of Masks • The House Beautiful & The Decorative Arts • The Soul of Man Under Socialism • The Decay of Lying • Selected Journalism (1882 - 1889) • Impressions of America • De Profundis • Two Letters to the Daily Chronicle

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rachelandthecity

    Wilde has such a gift with phrasing, I always think about how parallel he seems to me with Ryan Adams. So many accolades so early, then such a fever to tear him apart. Here's a few quotes: A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal. A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her. Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between. Anyon Wilde has such a gift with phrasing, I always think about how parallel he seems to me with Ryan Adams. So many accolades so early, then such a fever to tear him apart. Here's a few quotes: A little sincerity is a dangerous thing, and a great deal of it is absolutely fatal. A man can be happy with any woman as long as he does not love her. Always forgive your enemies; nothing annoys them so much. America is the only country that went from barbarism to decadence without civilization in between. Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination. Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing. Biography lends to death a new terror. Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative. Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter. Fashion is a form of ugliness so intolerable that we have to alter it every six months. Genius is born--not paid. I always like to know everything about my new friends, and nothing about my old ones. I am not young enough to know everything. I think that God in creating Man somewhat overestimated his ability. If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you. Illusion is the first of all pleasures. It is always a silly thing to give advice, but to give good advice is fatal. Man is least himself when he talks in his own person. Give him a mask, and he will tell you the truth. Morality, like art, means drawing a line someplace. Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone elses opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation. One can survive everything, nowadays, except death, and live down everything except a good reputation. One should always play fairly when one has the winning cards. Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tosh

    So essential it's not even funny. Not a better writer in the English language. Also if one can have a hero in this world, I think Wilde can fit that bill. He maybe the first writer that I realize was a rebel of sorts. My first actual rock n' roll figure that I looked up to. I started reading Wilde as a young teenager - due to the fact that he seemed to be the most glamourous figure in literature. Most of my high school friends were into the Beats or such toss as Jonathan Bach, but Wilde was my (a So essential it's not even funny. Not a better writer in the English language. Also if one can have a hero in this world, I think Wilde can fit that bill. He maybe the first writer that I realize was a rebel of sorts. My first actual rock n' roll figure that I looked up to. I started reading Wilde as a young teenager - due to the fact that he seemed to be the most glamourous figure in literature. Most of my high school friends were into the Beats or such toss as Jonathan Bach, but Wilde was my (as T-Rex's Marc Bolan would say ) mainman. And the fact that I am straight to be attracted to such a guy figure had a great importance in my life. Wilde represented a third way to me. The fact that he was outside of his culture appealed to my aesthetic - plus it was sexy. Oscar Wilde, born in the 19th Century and dying in the new 20th Century - was truly an artist of the 20th Century. Oscar Wilde I salute you!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    What can I say? You either love Wilde or you don't understand him, and I love him. What can I say? You either love Wilde or you don't understand him, and I love him.

  5. 4 out of 5

    itsdanixx

    Before starting this collection I had actually never read anything by Oscar Wilde - I have now read everything by Oscar Wilde, and can officially say I am a massive fan! His writing is incredibly clever and witty, but also riveting, humorous and beautiful. My favourites would be The Importance of Being Earnest, The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Happy Prince & Other Tales, The Ballad of Reading Gaol, and De Profundis. The works included - and my general opinion of them - are as follows: PLAYS: V Before starting this collection I had actually never read anything by Oscar Wilde - I have now read everything by Oscar Wilde, and can officially say I am a massive fan! His writing is incredibly clever and witty, but also riveting, humorous and beautiful. My favourites would be The Importance of Being Earnest, The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Happy Prince & Other Tales, The Ballad of Reading Gaol, and De Profundis. The works included - and my general opinion of them - are as follows: PLAYS: Vera, or The Nihilists - 3 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Duchess of Padua - 2 Stars ⭐️⭐️ Lady Windermere’s Fan - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ A Woman of No Importance - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ An Ideal Husband - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Importance of Being Earnest - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Salomé - 3 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️ La Saint Courtisane - 3 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️ A Florentine Tragedy - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ NOVEL: The Picture of Dorian Gray - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ STORIES & FAIRY-TALES: The Happy Prince and Other Tales - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ - The Happy Prince - 5 Stars - The Nightingale and the Rose - 5 Stars - The Selfish Giant - 4 Stars - The Devoted Friend - 5 Stars - The Remarkable Rocket - 5 Stars Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime and Other Stories - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ - Lord Arthur Saville’s Crime - 4 Stars - The Canterville Ghost - 5 Stars - The Sphinx Without a Secret - 4 Stars - The Model Millionaire- 4 Stars - The Portrait of Mr W.H. - 1.5 Stars A House of Pomegranates - 2 Stars ⭐️⭐️ - The Young King - 2 Stars - The Birthday of the Infanta - 2 Stars - The Fisherman and His Soul - 3 Stars - The Star-Child - 3 Stars POEMS: The Complete Poems - 4 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The Ballad of Reading Gaol (special mention) - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ ESSAYS AND LETTERS: De Profundis - 5 Stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ And in the spirit of complete honesty, I actually didn’t read the other essays included in the collection - Intentions and The Soul of Man Under Socialism - as I knew they wouldn’t interest me, and so they have not affected my rating.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tinquerbelle

    1) The Picture of Dorian Gray 2) Lord Arthur Savile's Crime 3) The Canterville Chost 4) The Sphinx Without a Secret 5) The Model Millionaire 6) The Young King 7) The Birthday of the Infanta 8) The Fisherman and His Soul 9) The Star-Child 10) The Happy Prince 11) The Nightingale and the Rose 12) The Selfish Giant 13) The Devoted Friend 15) The Remarkable Rocket 16) The Importance of Being Earnest 17) Lady Windermere's Fan 18) A Woman of No Importance 19) An Ideal Husband 20) Salome 21) The Duchess of Padua 22) Vera, 1) The Picture of Dorian Gray 2) Lord Arthur Savile's Crime 3) The Canterville Chost 4) The Sphinx Without a Secret 5) The Model Millionaire 6) The Young King 7) The Birthday of the Infanta 8) The Fisherman and His Soul 9) The Star-Child 10) The Happy Prince 11) The Nightingale and the Rose 12) The Selfish Giant 13) The Devoted Friend 15) The Remarkable Rocket 16) The Importance of Being Earnest 17) Lady Windermere's Fan 18) A Woman of No Importance 19) An Ideal Husband 20) Salome 21) The Duchess of Padua 22) Vera, or the Nihilists 23) A Florentine Tragedy 24) La Sainte Courtisane 25) Poems 26) Poems in Prose 27) De Profundis 28) Two Letters to the Daily Chronicle 29) The Decay of Lying 30) Pen, Pencil and Poison 31) The Critic as Artist 32) The Truth of Masks 33) The Soul of Man Under Socialism 34) The Rise of Historical Criticism 35) The Portrait of Mr. W.H. 36) A Few Maxims for the Instruction of the Over-Educated 37) Phrases and Philosophies for the Use of the Young

  7. 4 out of 5

    Aurélien Thomas

    I remember discovering Oscar Wilde with 'The Picture of Dorian Gray', a luscious and decadent read which, ironically enough, had not only made his success but also caused his downfall (being quoted ad nauseam during his trial). Well, Oscar Wilde, we know, finally ended up in jail. His work from behind bars is, about, really touching. First, 'De Profundis', his letter to his lover, is an insightful take upon his fate - the pain of a man looked upon, ruined and humiliated, who nevertheless has the I remember discovering Oscar Wilde with 'The Picture of Dorian Gray', a luscious and decadent read which, ironically enough, had not only made his success but also caused his downfall (being quoted ad nauseam during his trial). Well, Oscar Wilde, we know, finally ended up in jail. His work from behind bars is, about, really touching. First, 'De Profundis', his letter to his lover, is an insightful take upon his fate - the pain of a man looked upon, ruined and humiliated, who nevertheless has the unforgiving lucidity to don't spare himself for his mistakes. For sure, it reeks of a sad bitterness! It is, nevertheless, quite disarming for its deep honesty. Then, 'The Ballad of Reading Gaol'. Powerful verses, grim but deeply heartfelt, here's one of his most intense text, and surely one of his best work. Well, as far as I am concerned, it certainly stands out from the rest of his poetry, which, I confess, I don't really like (I had made my point on Burning Words Poetry -https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8Bsh...) His 'Poems' indeed are, overall, quite bad. A classicist at heart, Oscar Wilde attempted to follow strict formal rules that are everything but suited to his stylised and flowery language, going over the top and feeling way too rigid. I preferred his 'Prose Poems', where he discarded such strictness to completely unleash himself. In fact, mostly religious (mystic?) his prose displays him at his playful best. As for the plays... I am not one for theatre; it's just not my cup of tea. I have to say though that I absolutely enjoyed reading most of his! 'Lady Windermere's Fan' (my personal favourite), 'The Importance of Being Earnest', 'A Woman of No Importance'… Oscar Wilde is witty, sharp, cynical and sarcastic, always catching the reader off-guard with the unexpected, and his creativity and bluntness are a delight that takes no prisoner. I just struggled with 'An Ideal Husband', predictable, too long, and tiring for its feel of déja vu. I didn't know he had written a tragedy ('The Duchess of Padua'), which was a nice surprise, especially since it's a really good play overall. My favourite remains, however, 'Salomé' - wonderfully poetic, dark, occult, bathed in bloody moonlight, all here is but foggy vision dancing enthrallingly before our hypnotised eyes. Noteworthy too are his essays on Art. 'Intentions' and 'The Decay of Lying' may not be ground breaking, but they deserve a read to better understand what he meant by some of his most famous (and misunderstood!) quotes -e.g. 'life imitates art'... His tales are entertaining too, though I disliked the ones he wrote for children (for me personally all unsuited and complete failure). All in all then, here's a great compilation. It can feel unequal (again, some of his work was really bad -most of his poems, a few tales...) but, considering how far ranging, creative, sharp and, above all, so unique such a writer was, it's impossible to don't be in awe. A pure jewel, that deserves to adorn the personal libraries of every lovers of literature.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Classic reverie

    As I read Oscar Wilde, I will read from this collection where my notes and highlights will be. I will review his works by their title. Look under my Oscar Wilde shelf for my list. There are no typos notes yet and very navigational.

  9. 5 out of 5

    elena

    I FINALLY DID IT!!! on the whole i loved the experience of being able to read all of Wilde's works. I loved the majority o his works, but some i just couldn't't get into... i probably wasn't smart enough lmao so yeah, took a while but i'm very glad i did this! I FINALLY DID IT!!! on the whole i loved the experience of being able to read all of Wilde's works. I loved the majority o his works, but some i just couldn't't get into... i probably wasn't smart enough lmao so yeah, took a while but i'm very glad i did this!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amena

    Brilliant writing. Real, deep themes which one can relate to the present life. A fantastic ending. Definitely worth every single one of those 5 stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    El

    This review is a work-in-progress. I'm reading this whole collection, but will be reviewing the individual reads separately as I go along, so don't be all confused by the otherwise seemingly random posting of Wilde stories and plays. I am going to skip reading The Picture of Dorian Gray because I read that just a few years ago. My review is behind that link; knock yourself out. Individual reviews will be linked here as I go along, just to really annoy everyone each time it pops up in their updates This review is a work-in-progress. I'm reading this whole collection, but will be reviewing the individual reads separately as I go along, so don't be all confused by the otherwise seemingly random posting of Wilde stories and plays. I am going to skip reading The Picture of Dorian Gray because I read that just a few years ago. My review is behind that link; knock yourself out. Individual reviews will be linked here as I go along, just to really annoy everyone each time it pops up in their updates: Short Stories Lord Arthur Savile's Crime The Canterville Ghost Fables, Fairy Tales, and Other Really Really Short Pieces Filled with Morals The Sphinx Without a Secret The Model Millionaire The Young King The Birthday of the Infanta The Fisherman and His Soul The Star-Child The Happy Prince The Nightingale and the Rose The Selfish Giant The Devoted Friend The Remarkable Rocket Plays The Importance of Being Earnest Lady Windermere's Fan A Woman of No Importance An Ideal Husband Salomé The Duchess of Padua Next up... Vera, or The Nihilists. Aug 7, 2019 Another behemoth that deserves my attention once life settles down again. I will return to this after completing my graduate program.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Oscar Wilde is fabulous, and clever, and impossibly witty and Oscar Wilde knows it. Do yourself a favor, don't read this cover to cover - a little bit of Wilde goes a long way! Random thoughts: I was disappointed to find that the popular culture image of Dorian Grey didn't quite live up to the actual written depiction of him. Apparently the Victorian's were easily horrified, and I found some of the examples of his debauchery to be head scratchers. Especially his tendency to collect jewels and tap Oscar Wilde is fabulous, and clever, and impossibly witty and Oscar Wilde knows it. Do yourself a favor, don't read this cover to cover - a little bit of Wilde goes a long way! Random thoughts: I was disappointed to find that the popular culture image of Dorian Grey didn't quite live up to the actual written depiction of him. Apparently the Victorian's were easily horrified, and I found some of the examples of his debauchery to be head scratchers. Especially his tendency to collect jewels and tapestries and such (I'm sure there's some deeper meaning here, but I completely missed it). “The suspense is terrible. I hope it will last.” Willy Wonka was quoting Oscar Wilde, as it turns out.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Wow - why had a not read Oscar Wilde before? He immediately jumped to the top of my list of favorite authors...and easily at that! I love how an author who wrote over 100 years ago can make me laugh out loud; I love that his jabs at Americans are still relevant. So far the Canterville Ghost is my favorite, and I am currently reading the Picture of Dorian Gray.

  14. 4 out of 5

    outraged

    A must-have for every lover of literature. Oscar Wilde is a writer like no other. His words speak directly to one's heart, their soul, their subconsciousness.. He changed the way I understood writing and reading entirely, made me fall in love with his every word and get lost in his ideas, his thoughts, his world. I was 13 or 14 when I first picked up a paperback copy of his complete works on a whim. I remember feeling a little doubtful for buying such an expensive book from an author I had never A must-have for every lover of literature. Oscar Wilde is a writer like no other. His words speak directly to one's heart, their soul, their subconsciousness.. He changed the way I understood writing and reading entirely, made me fall in love with his every word and get lost in his ideas, his thoughts, his world. I was 13 or 14 when I first picked up a paperback copy of his complete works on a whim. I remember feeling a little doubtful for buying such an expensive book from an author I had never heard of before. Needless to say, I'm so glad I did. It's a book to read, adore, and re-read a thousand times.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia

    I love Oscar Wilde. His tales have been part of my life since I was a child. In my teenager years his plays were the "shelter" when I felt sad. His work is wonderful, but, in this special edition, you can find everything he wrote, even the poems (which are not so good as his other works to me). I have a 1968 edition of this Collins Classics with beautiful illustrations and a great introduction by Vyvyan Holland. Beautiful edition! I love Oscar Wilde. His tales have been part of my life since I was a child. In my teenager years his plays were the "shelter" when I felt sad. His work is wonderful, but, in this special edition, you can find everything he wrote, even the poems (which are not so good as his other works to me). I have a 1968 edition of this Collins Classics with beautiful illustrations and a great introduction by Vyvyan Holland. Beautiful edition!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chrysoula

    I received this book as a gift from my dad when I was about 13 years old. It's the special centenary edition. It was love at first sight. It's filled with my notes, my dried flowers (teen me was oh so romantic) and a piece of my soul. I received this book as a gift from my dad when I was about 13 years old. It's the special centenary edition. It was love at first sight. It's filled with my notes, my dried flowers (teen me was oh so romantic) and a piece of my soul.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leila M

    All of his work is so truthful and blunt. I started off collecting a few works here and there and ended up having to get the complete works.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    Okay, as recently, I'm mopping up some titles from "To Read Short Fiction Lists", genre and lit, and as I'm in the W's.... I had 3 pieces from Wilde on the list - I've previously read a *bit* of him (about 10 stories, mostly thanks to Dedalus Books Decadence series) but, for example, haven't tackled an obvious must-read like The Picture of Dorian Grey. "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" is probably the most "Wildean" thing here, and in it one can see Wilde's black humor and some origins of a writer like Okay, as recently, I'm mopping up some titles from "To Read Short Fiction Lists", genre and lit, and as I'm in the W's.... I had 3 pieces from Wilde on the list - I've previously read a *bit* of him (about 10 stories, mostly thanks to Dedalus Books Decadence series) but, for example, haven't tackled an obvious must-read like The Picture of Dorian Grey. "Lord Arthur Savile's Crime" is probably the most "Wildean" thing here, and in it one can see Wilde's black humor and some origins of a writer like Saki (in one direction) and P.G. Wodehouse (in another). British upper crust life had advanced to such a point, seemingly, that one could be terribly naughty by writing a deliberately lighthearted piece about cold-blooded attempted murder, poison and anarchist bombs. Shocking! That may sound like I'm being sarcastic but actually I'm not, it's just interesting to me how levels of privilege, culture, comfort and stability (timed historically differently, of course, across varied social and class strata) invariably give rise to an impulse like this, a turning inward, a jaundiced view of the status quo, satirically and cheekily expressed. So here we have a society party of humorous cartoons (lots of witty bon mots tossed around - "The world is a stage but the play is poorly cast.") where a nobleman (Lord Savile, natch) has his palm read and is told he will commit murder in the future. Being a good upstanding chap, and not wanting to ruin his intended nuptials, he sets about trying to figure out who the least important person is that he can murder in his social circle. Hilarity ensues as poison, bombs and drownings prove ineffective until chance steps in. Of course, part of the joke is that Savile never questions (and we should never expect him to question) the accuracy of such a prediction from a dubious source, because then the ultimate joke of basing your actions on dubious sources, and the empty trendiness of the moneyed classes (and possibly their coldness to human suffering) would be undone. "The Star Child" is Wilde operating in his Fairy Tale Mode. In many ways it is a traditional fairy tale with an obvious moral - a poor family finds an abandoned baby and raises him to be a beautiful boy. But the boy is cruel, arrogant and hateful and despises the poverty around him, torturing small animals and displaying his ingratitude at every opportunity, so magically he is turned ugly and has to go forth in the world to learn humility - which he does, by trying to complete three impossible tasks, aided by animal servitors. The Wildean punch, when it comes, lies not so much in the classically-beautiful-but-cruel main character but instead in the short and oddly ominous last line of the piece, as if Wilde could not completely commit himself to the eternal awe and wonder of happily ever after. "The Decay Of Lying" is an essay (presented as a dialogue) and, honestly, I'll probably need to give it another read and dissect it at my leisure at a later date because I was mostly in the wrong head-space when I read it. Essentially, it's Wilde's barbed answer to the rise of the Naturalist/Realist movement in literature (Zola, etc.), which eschewed imagination and flights of fancy for close observations of the real world and people. Wilde believes this idea is terrible and sketches out what he believes literature (and almost almost all art) should consist of, how it should proceed and what its goals should be. Sui generis, inventive and imaginative, essentially - "effective lying" is the ultimate creativity. Having recently codified my own approach to the arts (well, certainly literature) as that of a Generalist/Surveyor, I can't take an us/them, good/bad argument about literature *so* seriously. I find such screeds fascinating - not as an expression of "the truth" but as "one way of looking at things" (from a particular position, in a particular moment in time, given what has come before, what was happening then and what was to come) - even as my mind begins to undermine the argument (and, in case I haven't made my point, I'd have the same reaction to a po-faced essay about the obvious superiority of realism over imagination). These kind of essays/arguments *are* important - it *was* important that someone had them and they *remain* important as records of thought processes, as we try to move forward - except we don't seem to be moving forward very much and those records seem to be ignored, as we seem to JUST KEEP HAVING the same binary us/them, good/bad stupid/reductive arguments over and over again even centuries later (just recently, in my life in fact). I do believe the human mind is vast and can hold many ideas, some of them contradictory. I do not think there is only one way to "do art" or that the term "art" is pretentious, or that "entertainment" is below contempt for that matter, OR that a perfect blending of "art" and "entertainment" is the Ultimate Goal for THAT matter. I do think that different approaches yield different results and have different successes, achievements, failures and traps. This doesn't seem very hard for me at all and I wonder why people seem so driven into singular conceptions - perhaps it's the varied arrogance and insecurity underlying the desperately clung-to worldviews? So, for example, when I read this essay I find it fascinating: Wilde is witty (duh), charming, intelligent and erudite and his argument makes sense - until I remember that some realist novels have, in my life, packed just as much impact as the imaginative ones. I look at what he's saying and think "hmmm, interesting that the Decadents take *part* of his stance - invention and artificiality - and discard others - by focusing on the dregs and degradation of real life". I think of genre writers who bristle at being labelled escapist and regularly chalk up straight Lit as "boring" - thus placing them in Wilde's camp - yet Wilde would be appalled to find them worrying over research, realistic detail and promoting social causes and the underrepresented. But I'll have to reread it. There's a good argument to be made that Wilde is deliberately overstating his case so as to have a kind of unspoken criticisms of its excesses built right into the text. Still, lots of fun!

  19. 5 out of 5

    ella

    Last summer, I bought this 1,114 page book from a used bookstore in Gallway, Ireland for €6 (what a steal!). It was the second Oscar Wilde book I had bought that trip (along with an Oscar Wilde tea towel and calendar). Packing light is stupid anyways. And, of course, now, during quarantine, is the perfect time to read it. I wonder what Oscar Wilde would be doing during the pandemic. Okay I digress. Now that I’m done it feels surreal (1,000 amazing pages oh my god). But this book was great because I Last summer, I bought this 1,114 page book from a used bookstore in Gallway, Ireland for €6 (what a steal!). It was the second Oscar Wilde book I had bought that trip (along with an Oscar Wilde tea towel and calendar). Packing light is stupid anyways. And, of course, now, during quarantine, is the perfect time to read it. I wonder what Oscar Wilde would be doing during the pandemic. Okay I digress. Now that I’m done it feels surreal (1,000 amazing pages oh my god). But this book was great because I had had no idea about some of his shorter stories and poems and plays and found new favorites! Here is a list of Oscar’s best, most well-known works: - The Picture of Dorian Gray - The Importance of Being Earnest - Lady Windermere’s Fan - A Woman of No Importance - An Idea Husband - The Ballad of Reading Goal - De Profundis Here’s a list of other works that I really liked: - The Canterville Ghost - Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime - The Duchess of Padua - The Happy Prince - The poems Requiescat, At Verona, and Silentium Amoris - The Portrait of Mr. W. H. I’d highly recommend Oscar Wilde. I’m not even going to try to explain how much and why I love his work because as neither Critic nor Artist, I cannot do it justice. Anyways, thank you Oscar, for all of the 1,114 pages of published writing I’ve read in the past 5 weeks. I loved it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kris Larson

    I actually hate having all my Wilde in one volume. When I lived in my studio apartment and found myself alone of an evening, I would sometimes make tea and cucumber sandwiches and curl up to re-read The Importance of Being Earnest. But now I've got this great big book which refuses to be curled up with -- I should never have sold my individual Earnest. Still, it's nice to have access to Wilde-ian works I probably wouldn't own otherwise. I actually hate having all my Wilde in one volume. When I lived in my studio apartment and found myself alone of an evening, I would sometimes make tea and cucumber sandwiches and curl up to re-read The Importance of Being Earnest. But now I've got this great big book which refuses to be curled up with -- I should never have sold my individual Earnest. Still, it's nice to have access to Wilde-ian works I probably wouldn't own otherwise.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    This volume contained everything that Oscar Wilde ever wrote from his only novel, to his short stories, poems, essays, plays and letters. This volume started with his only novel he wrote The Picture of Dorian Gray and this was such a great read with a plot that was really fascinating and characters who were entertaining and deeply developed. This then went into his short stories which were also really well written. Some stories stood out more so than others; some had great morals and messages, w This volume contained everything that Oscar Wilde ever wrote from his only novel, to his short stories, poems, essays, plays and letters. This volume started with his only novel he wrote The Picture of Dorian Gray and this was such a great read with a plot that was really fascinating and characters who were entertaining and deeply developed. This then went into his short stories which were also really well written. Some stories stood out more so than others; some had great morals and messages, whereas some were more forgettable and dragged on, but the way he ended his stories was so sharp, clever and final. Next, came his plays and again some were better than others. His most famous plays are famous for a reason, they were really well written and the way he constructed them caught the reader off guard with unexpected endings. There were ones that the reader completely forgot about once they read them, but for the most part his plays were fun and engaging. Next, came the poems; the reader isn’t a big fan of poetry and so some really didn’t resonate with them, but they read quickly. Then were his letters. The first one was a tell-all to the guy who put him in prison, and it was so open and honest and raw; so many emotions went through it and the reader couldn’t help but be encapsulated and engrossed in the story. His other letters were honest and real but not as good as that first letter, De Profundis. The volume closes with his essays and that as such a daunting way to end his works. Some were so long and intimidating to get through. Wilde talked in circles, saying the same thing in different ways and it felt like he added filler in to make them even longer than they really needed to be to fluff them up. Overall, the reader is glad to have read all of his works, not everything was the best, but Wilde was still a very skilled writer and died too soon. 

  22. 5 out of 5

    Subramaniam Avinash

    I found about 40 percent of this collection terrific. The rest, not very interesting. In particular, I thought the stories he wrote for children between 8 and 80 were brilliant. And so was The Importance of Being Earnest.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dianne Durante

    Reading this in bits and pieces.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    Another one of my favourite writers of all time. Will come back later to fully review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    So this took a while. I started way back when and went quickly through the stories and plays. I was in the poems when Covid hit, and I didn’t pick it up again for several months. I started reading again in the fall of 2020, and I must say that some of the essays went faster than others. I skipped the poetry. I do not currently have the patience for poetry. But I basically finished the complete works of Oscar Wilde, and I love him. He is hilarious, brilliant, sly, penetrating and someone I wish I So this took a while. I started way back when and went quickly through the stories and plays. I was in the poems when Covid hit, and I didn’t pick it up again for several months. I started reading again in the fall of 2020, and I must say that some of the essays went faster than others. I skipped the poetry. I do not currently have the patience for poetry. But I basically finished the complete works of Oscar Wilde, and I love him. He is hilarious, brilliant, sly, penetrating and someone I wish I could meet. One of the most enjoyable parts was finding all of the things that have been alluded to in other works that I’ve read and seen. He was the progenitor of so much. If you don’t understand any of these notes, know that I don’t understand some of them now either :) Picture of Dorian Gray “Thin-lippped wisdom spoke at her from the worn chair, hinted at prudence, quoted from that book of cowardice whose author apes the name of common sense.” The introduction was interesting to read - I didn’t know that there was a debate about whether Oscar Wilde produced legitimate literature. Perfumes, jewels and tapestries, ecclesiastical vestments - the church doors of Hunchback, the oak tree of Les Mis, the shiplore of Moby Dick. What is it with the lit of the time? Did readers insist upon at least one treatise per novel? Other than showing that he’s a dilettante and free with his trust fund and the passage of time, what purpose served? Ok, when I type it out, that seems like a lot of purpose “Unconsciously [Dorian Gray] defines for me the lines of a fresh school, a school that is to have in it all the passion of the romantic spirit, all the perfection of the spirit that ins Greek. The harmony of soul and body - how much that is! We in our madness have separated the two, and have invented a realism that is vulgar, an ideality that is void.” Strange echos of the yoga book I just read - making just the same point about the harmony of soul and body. And again, 30 pages later: “Soul and body, body and soul - how mysterious they were! There was animalism in the soul, and the body had moments of spirituality. There senses could refine, and the intellect could degrade. Who could say where the fleshly impulse ceased, or the physical impulse began? How shallow were the arbitrary definitions of ordinary psychologists! And yet how difficult to decide between the claims of the various schools! Was the soul a shadow seated in the house of sin? Or was the body really in the soul, as Giordano Bruno thought? The separation of spirit from matter was a mystery, and the union of spirit with matter was a mystery also?” “He began to wonder whether we could ever make psychology so absolute a science that each little spring of life would be revealed to us. As it was, we always misunderstood ourselves, and rarely understood others.” Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime “The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast.” Hamlets are playing jesters; Guildensterns are playing Hamlet. Wedding preparations can be such a hassle The Canterville Ghost Hylo-idealism is the philosophical position that reality exists by virtue of our belief in it. Oh, Americans The Fisherman and His Soul I was hoping the internet would have something to say about the long, flowery, seemingly full of hidden meaning passages where the Soul attempts to tempt the Fisherman. If anybody can point me in the right direction, please leave a comment. (To clarify, every analysis mentions the passages - I am looking for one that addresses the details.) The Star Child I liked this one. But whoa that last paragraph. Who spit in Wilde’s bean curd that day? The Remarkable Rocket Conversation amongst fireworks “‘The world is certainly very beautiful,’ cried a little Squib. ‘Just look at those yellow tulips. Why! If they were real crackers they could not be lovelier. I am very glad I have traveled. Travel improves the mind wonderfully, and does away with all one’s prejudices.’” “She was one of those people who think that, if you say the same thing over and over a great many times, it becomes true in the end.” The Portrait of Mr WH I do believe LM Montgomery read Wilde. I am seeing several homages. The most recent being the question of whether ‘‘tis better to be good or good-looking.” This is a story for people who have at least a passing familiarity with the sonnets of Shakespeare. Alas, I do not. I thought he didn’t want people to know he was gay. Unrelatedly “Indeed, if sex be an element in artistic creation, it might be rather urged that the delightful combination of wit and romance which characterizes so many of Shakespeare’s heroines was at least occasioned if it was not actually caused by the fact that the players of these parts were lads and young men, whose passionate purity, quick mobile fancy, and healthy freedom from sentimentality can hardly fail to have suggested a new and delightful type of girlhood or of womanhood.” Yeah, why do we even have girls. grrrr. Also, points to me for wading through a work full of book-length sentences. “We need not regret [the hissing, hooting, and pippin-pelting of some of the first female actresses at Blackfriars] in any way. The essentially male culture of the English Renaissance found its filles and most perfect expression by its own method, and in its own manner.” Grrrrrrr. Seriously, I will bite him. Wow, Shakespeare is f-ing harsh to his lady love: “My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips’ red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.” I’d slap his face. Take note, my love. But there are a million reasons to forgive Shakespeare, when he writes lines like: “For I have sworn thee fair, and thought thee bright, Who art as black as hell, as dark as night.” That’s pretty much as perfect as two lines can be. “It seemed to me that I was not merely restoring Cyril Graham to his proper place in literary history, but rescuing the honour of Shakespeare himself from the tedious memory of a commonplace intrigue. I put into the letter all my enthusiasm. I put into the letter all my faith.” “No sooner, in fact, had I sent it off than a curious reaction came over me. It seemed to me that I had given away my capacity for belief in the Willie Hughes theory of the Sonnets, that something had gone out of me, as it were, and that I was perfectly indifferent to the whole subject. What was it that had happened? It is difficult to say. Perhaps, by finding perfect expression for a passion, I had exhausted the passion itself. [Me - The good and the bad thing about writing things out.] Emotional forces, like the forces of physical life, have their positive limitations. Perhaps the mere effort to convert anyone to a theory involves some form of renunciation of the power of credence. Influence is simply a transference of personality, a mode of giving away what is most precious to one’s self, and its exercise produces a sense, and, it may be, a reality of loss. Every disciple takes away something from his master.” Writing something down definitely decreases my passion, frequently in a positive way (making me less angry, hurt or frustrated). Interesting thought that influence involves an actual transference of personality. I do feel like I give something up when talking people into things. But that may just be the exhaustion of human interaction. The Importance of Being Earnest “I ask merely for information.” Cheaper by dozen . Fun to find references. Flowers for Algernon? Found in a handbag in the cloak room of Victoria station - Hitchhikers Guide Felt I must be wrong in drawing the conclusion that he was marrying his first cousin. Looked it up online to confirm. Forgot it was daisies back then. Really funny Lady Windermere’s Fan So many things people have taken from Wilde. His oft quoted “a cynic is a man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing” is in this one, but around every corner is a reference. I’m starting to question whether authors do anything but steal from Wilde. Was he the first in literature to state that men and women could not be friends? A Woman of No Importance Mrs. Allonby rings such a bell - where have I heard of her before? He must really like, having used in it two plays “All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That is his.” Illingsworth does, in fact, make me ill. An Ideal Husband “Do you think that what I did nearly eighteen years ago should be brought up against me now? Do you think it fair that a man’s whole career should be ruined for a fault done in one’s boyhood almost? Is it fair that the folly, the sin of one’s youth, if men choose to call it a sin, should wreck a life like mine, should place me in the pillory, should shatter all that I have worked for, all that I have built up?” Well that’s prescient. “A man’s life is of more value than a woman’s. It has larger issues, wider scope, greater ambitions. A woman’s life revolves in curves of emotions. It is upon lines of intellect that a man’s life progresses. Don’t make any terrible mistake, Lady Chiltern. A woman who can keep a man’s love, and love him in return, has done all the world wants of women, or should want of them.” - Lord Goring, “showing the philosopher that underlies the dandy.” Unforgivable. The Duchess of Padua P. 620 “I do beseech your grace...” Unbelievable that it is just as true today as it was then. Essays, etc. His obsession with the teacups in Chinatown (SF) vs. the thicker teacups of his expensive hotel is concerning. (The House Beautiful, The Decorative Arts, Personal Impressions of America... just so far!) Why aren’t book reviews as good as “A Ride Through Morocco” anymore? I would read the shit out of that book based on the review. A lot of these are meh for me - part of the problem is that it’s hard for newspaper articles to all age well for 120 years. De Profundis “From the Depths” “Letter: In Prison and in Chains” So, don’t piss off a legendary writer if you don’t want to be eviscerated in prose But I question, has Wilde read his own works? His boyfriend seems to behave as his characters do (ones written before their relationship) . What does he expect? “When you are not on your pedestal you are not interesting. The next time you are ill I will go away at once.“ “For you to write thus to me, when the very illness and fever from which I was suffering I had caught from tending you, was of course revolting in it’s coarseness and crudity; but for any human being in the whole world to write thus to another would be a sin for which there is no pardon, were there any sin for which there is none.” “Of seed-time or harvest, of the reapers bending over the corn, or the grape-gatherers threading through the vines, of the grass in the orchard made white with broken blossoms, or strewn with fallen fruit, we know nothing, and can know nothing. For us there is only one season, the season of Sorrow.” How do you fucking write like that? And with that he makes a turn from plain-spoken grievance to forgiveness with metaphor. By p. 1020 full on. I wonder if this letter sets a record for longest letter. “And exactly as in Art one is only concerned with what a particular thing is at a particular moment to oneself, so it is also in the ethical evolution of one’s character. I have got to make everything that has happened to me good for me.“ “Who can calculate the orbit of his own soul?“ People whose desire is solely for self-realization never know where they are going.” “To have become a deeper man is the privilege of those who have suffered.” Covid is not prison, but it ain’t a east Hampton clambake either, and I’m grateful to have learned the things I’ve learned The Decay of Lying Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose “I should have thought that our politicians kept up that habit.” “I assure you that they do not. They never rise be on the level of misrepresentation, and actually condescend to prove, to discuss, to argue. How different from the temper of the true liar, with his frank, fearless statements, his superb irresponsibility, his healthy, natural distain of proof of any kind!” Wow. “Society sooner or later must return to its lost leader, the cultured and fascinating liar.” Done. Is my internal cry of “you’re not doing it right!” The wrong approach? Am I wrong to want to save and improve lives? It’s the cat dilemma... a long and boring life indoors, or a short, dashing, satisfying life outside. My bond with Oscar Wilde is that we find the same types of people tedious. Of course, this is really a treatise on lying it art, not life. And Wilde is a genius about it, as usual. Although if, as his character conjectures, life does in fact imitate art, perhaps we can blame the state of the world on him. Pen, pencil, and poison Monumentally boring until the poison part The permanence of personality as a metaphysical problem predates GGP Grey by at least this much. “We cannot re-write the whole of history for the purpose of gratifying our moral sense of what should be.“ There is nothing new in the world. The Critic as Artist DNF - dreck Part two was a bit better The Soul of Man Under Socialism “It has debarred one part of the community from being individual by starving them. It has debarred the other part of the community from being individual by putting them on the wrong road, and encumbering them.” Exactly why you need a middle class. We have the best of both worlds. No starvation, and only as much encumbrance as we can afford. Credit, of course, a problem. Individual control over one’s destiny vs. the influence of outside factors. Forrest’s feather, Cimba’s hair. How much are we ourselves, how much is what is done to us? And, even more unknowably, how much is this true of others? Do they even exist? Heinlein: “It is my belief that history is a story of the action of individuals, acting according to their characters in the environments in which they find themselves. A change either in character or in environment would change the resulting action.” - Professor Cathcart, For Us the Living What would a world be like in which Russia had remained an ally? The Rise of Historical Criticism If you are looking for a deep deep dive into Greek historical writings from the perspective of one at the fin de siècle, this is for you. I skimmed.

  26. 4 out of 5

    SE Panoply

    http://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/201... When I first read this I wasn't necessarily a fan of Oscar Wilde. I was just curious about his work and I realized the easiest and fastest way to read it all was just to buy the book and call it a day. Overall a very interesting and relatively quick read. Interesting in the sense of getting everything. Background history, the fairy tales, plays, novel, essays are all accounted for, and quick to read in the fact of most everything in this book can be breezed http://bookwayfarer.wordpress.com/201... When I first read this I wasn't necessarily a fan of Oscar Wilde. I was just curious about his work and I realized the easiest and fastest way to read it all was just to buy the book and call it a day. Overall a very interesting and relatively quick read. Interesting in the sense of getting everything. Background history, the fairy tales, plays, novel, essays are all accounted for, and quick to read in the fact of most everything in this book can be breezed through with no real issue. The only problem for me was near the end of the book. The poems and the essays seemed to drag on and on. One reason is, I'm not really a poetry reader usually, so it was a little painful since it was poetry and I wasn't about to skip it since, it's my book and I don't like wasting money if I'm not going to read the whole thing. Secondly, most of the essay's seemed repetitious and some were just longer than necessary. I realize everything Oscar Wilde ever wrote is included, but this is what I've learned and care to share. The only one of the essays that I didn't really mind reading was De Profundis. It was genuinely interesting since it was about the man who put him in prison and was written to him from prison. Otherwise I have no regrets in buying this book. It was definitely worth the $10 I put into it and I would definitely recommend this to anyone who is interested in reading the whole kaboodle of Wilde's work.

  27. 4 out of 5

    ☽ Su ☾

    Wilde has such a gift with writing. He is fabulous, Honest and clever. this book is a collection of Wilde’s writings containing his only novel, The Portrait of Dorian Gray, as well as his plays, stories, poems, essays and letters. So many favorite quotes : “Why, anybody can have common sense, provided that they have no imagination” “It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious.” "What is a cynic?…A man who knows the price of everything and the value of no Wilde has such a gift with writing. He is fabulous, Honest and clever. this book is a collection of Wilde’s writings containing his only novel, The Portrait of Dorian Gray, as well as his plays, stories, poems, essays and letters. So many favorite quotes : “Why, anybody can have common sense, provided that they have no imagination” “It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious.” "What is a cynic?…A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing." “The ages live in history through their anachronisms.” “I am not sorry for anything that has happened. It has taught me to know myself better.” “Surely Love is a wonderful thing. It is more precious than emeralds, and dearer than fine opals. Pearls and pomegranates cannot buy it, nor is it set forth in the market-place. It may not be purchased of the merchants, nor can it be weighed out in the balance for gold.” “no theory of life seemed to him to be of any importance compared with life itself.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    Oscar Wilde is always so delightful, although what disturbing children's stories! I certainly would never read those stories to a child, with the exception of 'The Remarkable Rocket'. My favorite short stories were 'Lord Arthur Savile's Crime' and 'The Canterville Ghost'. Reading all the plays back to back does cause them to blend together just a bit, he had a habit of reusing his favorite lines over and over again. Overall I would say I enjoyed 'Vera' (The Nihilists) the most, which was the on Oscar Wilde is always so delightful, although what disturbing children's stories! I certainly would never read those stories to a child, with the exception of 'The Remarkable Rocket'. My favorite short stories were 'Lord Arthur Savile's Crime' and 'The Canterville Ghost'. Reading all the plays back to back does cause them to blend together just a bit, he had a habit of reusing his favorite lines over and over again. Overall I would say I enjoyed 'Vera' (The Nihilists) the most, which was the only play I had never heard of before purchasing this book. I wonder if 'De Profundis' should really be included, it is an interesting glimpse into his personal life but I could have done without his rambling religious views and much too long rehashing of everything that ever went wrong in his relationship.

  29. 4 out of 5

    angie haney

    This is THE book. Oscar Wilde writes with so much heart. His stories just ooze heart. Of all of his writings, Dorian Grey is probably my least favorite, and it is a masterpiece! The Happy Prince will tear your heart out. It is the most beautiful story I have ever read in my entire life. It is one of the things in my life that touched my heart so deeply that all I could do was cry at it's raw, pure, beauty. Every story has that same pure loveliness. This is a book that you can read over and over This is THE book. Oscar Wilde writes with so much heart. His stories just ooze heart. Of all of his writings, Dorian Grey is probably my least favorite, and it is a masterpiece! The Happy Prince will tear your heart out. It is the most beautiful story I have ever read in my entire life. It is one of the things in my life that touched my heart so deeply that all I could do was cry at it's raw, pure, beauty. Every story has that same pure loveliness. This is a book that you can read over and over and everytime it still just melts your heart. I am so in love with this book! Oh, to have been a gay man in Oscar Wilde's time! I would have been the Adam to his Steve any day!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    I love his fairy tales and stories. I love Dorian Gray, and I love his playfulness when it comes to questions of morality. It was therefore so sad to read his 'De Profundis'. Although written under extreme conditions, and therefore miraculously coherent, it revealed such a bitterness and moral disapproval on the part of the author. Did it diminish the magnitude of his genius? I'm not sure... I love his fairy tales and stories. I love Dorian Gray, and I love his playfulness when it comes to questions of morality. It was therefore so sad to read his 'De Profundis'. Although written under extreme conditions, and therefore miraculously coherent, it revealed such a bitterness and moral disapproval on the part of the author. Did it diminish the magnitude of his genius? I'm not sure...

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