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Sin City Volume 2: A Dame to Kill For Limited Edition

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Frank Miller has produced a pulse-pounding, blood-soaked, glass-shattering crime story about a thug who gets drawn back into the thick of things when an ex-lover returns with a sorry tale of "I never should have left you, and now I'm afraid that I may be killed." He should walk away probably, but that's not how things go in Sin City, where the weak get beat to hell and the Frank Miller has produced a pulse-pounding, blood-soaked, glass-shattering crime story about a thug who gets drawn back into the thick of things when an ex-lover returns with a sorry tale of "I never should have left you, and now I'm afraid that I may be killed." He should walk away probably, but that's not how things go in Sin City, where the weak get beat to hell and the strong . . . well, they get beat to hell, too. Miller's style results in some of the most impressive black-and-white art you'll see.


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Frank Miller has produced a pulse-pounding, blood-soaked, glass-shattering crime story about a thug who gets drawn back into the thick of things when an ex-lover returns with a sorry tale of "I never should have left you, and now I'm afraid that I may be killed." He should walk away probably, but that's not how things go in Sin City, where the weak get beat to hell and the Frank Miller has produced a pulse-pounding, blood-soaked, glass-shattering crime story about a thug who gets drawn back into the thick of things when an ex-lover returns with a sorry tale of "I never should have left you, and now I'm afraid that I may be killed." He should walk away probably, but that's not how things go in Sin City, where the weak get beat to hell and the strong . . . well, they get beat to hell, too. Miller's style results in some of the most impressive black-and-white art you'll see.

30 review for Sin City Volume 2: A Dame to Kill For Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    The second volume of Sin City continues the the same vein as the first. Dark violence and blood shed. Sexual deviance and twisted characters. Deception and corruption. I could go on and on . . . My thoughts on this volume are a bit different simply because the first volume and first movie have many similarities - and I have seen the first movie several times. While the second volume is supposed to be the same story as was depicted in the second movie, I have not seen it yet. Therefore, I had no The second volume of Sin City continues the the same vein as the first. Dark violence and blood shed. Sexual deviance and twisted characters. Deception and corruption. I could go on and on . . . My thoughts on this volume are a bit different simply because the first volume and first movie have many similarities - and I have seen the first movie several times. While the second volume is supposed to be the same story as was depicted in the second movie, I have not seen it yet. Therefore, I had no preconceived notions of what to expect. I can tell why this series is already considered a classic. The stories and the art are unique. The characters are very enthralling. Also, since there is a lot of bad stuff going on here, you almost feel like you are getting away with something when you are reading it. This is not for the feint of heart, but if you like murder, sex, corruption, really bad bad guys, and suspense, be sure to check this series out.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Algernon (Darth Anyan)

    Ava. You got me good, Babe. Just when I was pulling it back together you come along and rip my heart out one more time. Only this time you crossed a final, fatal line. You tricked me into doing something there's no coming back from. You've damned my soul to hell. In the first Sin City album, bruiser Marv got into a war with society over the killing of his one night stand. This time, scandal photographer and freelance investigator Dwight puts his own neck in the noose over an old flame of his. Av Ava. You got me good, Babe. Just when I was pulling it back together you come along and rip my heart out one more time. Only this time you crossed a final, fatal line. You tricked me into doing something there's no coming back from. You've damned my soul to hell. In the first Sin City album, bruiser Marv got into a war with society over the killing of his one night stand. This time, scandal photographer and freelance investigator Dwight puts his own neck in the noose over an old flame of his. Ava, a dame that left him for a wealthy playboy four years ago, wants him back. He knows she is poison, yet he cannot say no to her when she wiggles her charms at him (this lady has major issues with her wardrobe all over the album. She keeps losing them clothes. I can understand now why Eva Green was chosen for the role, she has a similar problem in a lot of her movies). The level of explicit violence, strong language and exposed breasts is no longer a surprise for a Sin City album. What truly impresses me is how good the story itself is, and how well the artwork serves the dark atmosphere and the twisted characters. It's always night time in Sin City, an urban jungle controlled by outcasts, criminals, ladies of pleasure and drug dealers. In an interesting twist of the series timeline, Marv from the first album returns to his usual seat in Kadie's Bar, watching the strip dancing of his protegee Nancy and breaking the arms of some hecklers. Marv will play a sidekick role for photographer Dwight, making the two albums overlap in time. I guess the following ones will use a similar technique, building on the already established characters and adding depth to the already complex setting. As the title suggests, the dame Ava Lord is the black queen of the chess game played by Frank Miller. She moves her pawns (her playboy husband, her bodyguard, Dwight, a cop, a mob boss, and so on) across the board, using them anyway she can to further her own greed for power. Dwight was once infatuated with her, but maybe this time she has pushed him too far, maybe this time she can no longer control him with a fake tear and a flutter of the eyelashes: Then the maybes kick in. Maybe I shouldn't put the blame on you. Maybe once I let the monster out something bad was sure to happen, just like it always has. Maybe a killer's a killer and I was just born that way. Maybe all you did was give me a target. Maybe. But I'm going to go ahead and blame you anyway. I have to blame you. Hate's the only think keeping me going so I'm holding on to it. The only reason I cannot give all the stars to the Frank Miller adult comic is his continuing penchant for naked ladies. He sends mixed messages: on the one hand, he empowers them, gives them control over their own lives (pro-tip: don't piss off little Miho, the ninja hooker), on the other hand he keeps drawing them as sex toys and the only occupations available in Basin City for women are stripper, waitress or hooker. Ava is one of the best villains in the noir gallery of femmes fatales, and I would lie if I didn't admit I found her panels alluring, but she is very close to becoming a caricature of herself - naked in practically every scene she features. On the plus side, I have no idea what to expect from the third album (besides tons of violence) and I look forward to learn more about the night creatures of Basin City, safely ensconced on my couch, knowing none of them is likely to come knocking at my own door. Can you tell I like Eva Green? Ok, only one more picture of her ... (all images here from the recent movie Sin City 2, a version that comes very close to the original comic)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    3.5 stars "Can we go dancing, Eddie? I feel crazy tonight. I just can't settle down." -- 'Doll' "Sure, baby. Dancing, tables, the works. You don't visit Sin City to read the Bible." -- 'Eddie' A Dame to Kill For is another slice of Miller's hard-edged and uber-violent pulp fiction / noir featuring big guns, big cars, and big crime. The 'dame' of the subtitle is the slinky Ava - perhaps named as a tribute to 50's silver-screen femme fatale, and ex-Mrs. Frank Sinatra, Ava Gardner? - a moll who sure k 3.5 stars "Can we go dancing, Eddie? I feel crazy tonight. I just can't settle down." -- 'Doll' "Sure, baby. Dancing, tables, the works. You don't visit Sin City to read the Bible." -- 'Eddie' A Dame to Kill For is another slice of Miller's hard-edged and uber-violent pulp fiction / noir featuring big guns, big cars, and big crime. The 'dame' of the subtitle is the slinky Ava - perhaps named as a tribute to 50's silver-screen femme fatale, and ex-Mrs. Frank Sinatra, Ava Gardner? - a moll who sure knows how to wrap a man (or five) around her duplicitous finger. In fact, there's a certain four-letter word that starts with a 'c' which perfectly describes her . . . COLD! (Gotcha there, didn't I?) Anyway, Ava drives her reformed ex-hub Dwight crazy with the deliberate misconception that they'll get back together, and this predictably results in male common sense sailing out the window, followed by numerous bodies falling all over the titular town. Ava is one of the more manipulative characters I've seen depicted in quite some time, but sooner or later everyone has to pay their due in Sin City.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    I thought it would be fun in anticipation for the new Sin City movie A Dame to kill for to read the comic that the movie is based upon. I loved the first movie (Actually bought it today and will try to re-watch it again soon) and I hope that the sequel will be just as good. Anyway the story in Sin City: A Dame to kill for is quite simple: Dwight is working as a photographer taking pictures of men having affairs with women. He gets contacted after a job by his old flame Ava Lord and she is the dam I thought it would be fun in anticipation for the new Sin City movie A Dame to kill for to read the comic that the movie is based upon. I loved the first movie (Actually bought it today and will try to re-watch it again soon) and I hope that the sequel will be just as good. Anyway the story in Sin City: A Dame to kill for is quite simple: Dwight is working as a photographer taking pictures of men having affairs with women. He gets contacted after a job by his old flame Ava Lord and she is the dame with a capital D for him. She is miserable in her marriage and scared and, of course, he will do anything to help her. And of course, he enlists Marv to help him. And that’s as much I will give away of the plot. I found the story very engrossing. It’s gritty, dark, noir and very much brutal to read and if you like that kind of graphic novels then you will love this one. Thank you Netgalley for providing me with a free copy for an honest review!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    It's hard to give a summary of the story without making it sound cheesy and stereotypical with far too much macho action, because the book, and series even, is all of those things but manages to be so much better than all of that. A sleazy photographer takes pictures of an extra-marital affair with which he plans to blackmail the man with - this is our hero. Then the noir element kicks in - the femme fatale enters the bar in a haze of smoke and shadows. She's in trouble, and the photographer cal It's hard to give a summary of the story without making it sound cheesy and stereotypical with far too much macho action, because the book, and series even, is all of those things but manages to be so much better than all of that. A sleazy photographer takes pictures of an extra-marital affair with which he plans to blackmail the man with - this is our hero. Then the noir element kicks in - the femme fatale enters the bar in a haze of smoke and shadows. She's in trouble, and the photographer called Dwight is the one to save her after all... they used to be lovers. And then we're off, onto a twisting plot through the deadly streets of Sin City to a blood soaked ending. I read the Sin City series shortly before the first movie back in 2005 and, now that the sequel's out, I thought I'd revisit this one to see if it holds up - and it most certainly does. This is Frank Miller: The Glory Years, when he was writing amazing Batman books, Daredevil stories, and creating his own comic masterpiece with Sin City. He writes and draws these books providing a master-class to all artists who read it: this is how you write a noir comic and make it both high art and bad-ass to boot. The book is in black and white, and Miller uses light and shadows to full effect in all of the panels. Look at Ava Lord's entrance: first full page silhouette with hazy white smoke at the top, then close up, then look at Dwight's face, then close up still but not making out any features on the shadowy face, then the meeting, then straight into dialogue fresh from the 1930s. It's so cinematic! Or Dwight's fight with Manute and his bloody end, flying through a window, falling with the glass, hitting the bottom of the page, then a blank black page, then a full page look at his spread-eagled, unconscious form - end of chapter. There are too many moments like this to go into but I was shaking my head in awe of Miller's use of black and white in this book. The guy created a unique look to these comics that remain untouched with age and still looks innovative today. I won't go into the twisty, turning plot which takes you one way and then, halfway through, switches direction with breath-taking ease and sends you hurtling another way. I will say one thing which is to read "The Hard Goodbye" before this as that's the first Sin City book and "A Dame To Kill For" is the second, and the two cross paths in their telling in a way that you'd appreciate more if you read them both in order. Hell, read them all, they're all brilliant! The dialogue is wonderful, full of macho metaphors, moody voice-overs, each character playing an archetype with relish and verve - they're cartoons, they know it, Miller knows it, and that frees them up to just have fun with it. Don't approach this book expecting realism - it's gritty but not at all in a realistic way. The book and series is nothing short of a triumph of high art, literature, and the beating heart of what people love most about comics: fun. If you know someone who doesn't like comics because to them it's for people with low IQs or are perennially stuck in childhood, give them a copy of this book and see if it won't change their mind. Noir was a great genre while it lasted and Chandler, Hammett, and Cain were all geniuses but Miller takes Noir and makes it even better with his Sin City stories. There should be another label for the genius of these books but there isn't so I'll end this review by urging new and old readers of the series to pick up these books if you're looking for a damn good read. Get yourself a copy and settle down with a shot and a brew - Marv and co. have some stories to tell you.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    WARNING: MILD SPOILERS. STRONG LANGUAGE. I don't like Dwight. And that's unfortunate, seeing as he's the main character. He looks down on other people. I also don't like the way he treats Marv or the way he talks about Marv. He also makes incredibly stupid decisions. This book is actually a great portrait and portrayal of addiction. Dwight is an addict. He has completely given up alcohol, drugs, and killing. Because he thinks he's a monster. He's sure that any little thing... speeding, having a d WARNING: MILD SPOILERS. STRONG LANGUAGE. I don't like Dwight. And that's unfortunate, seeing as he's the main character. He looks down on other people. I also don't like the way he treats Marv or the way he talks about Marv. He also makes incredibly stupid decisions. This book is actually a great portrait and portrayal of addiction. Dwight is an addict. He has completely given up alcohol, drugs, and killing. Because he thinks he's a monster. He's sure that any little thing... speeding, having a drink, etc. will turn him into the "monster" he was before. He never wants to go back to those days, and so he holds himself very tightly, in iron control. Then all that control is shattered when his ex-lover Ava reenters his life. She hasn't seen him in 4 years and feeds him some sob story about her husband being the devil. AVA: "You're right about me! I'm nothing but a selfish slut who threw away the only man she ever loved! Just like you said! But I was wrong, darling! Wrong! I'm in hell, Dwight. It's worse than you can imagine.... Oh God... I wish I could go back in time. Back to the way it was. To you and me. I'm such a selfish, stupid slut." DWIGHT: "You made your bed. Sleep in it." AVA: "Forgive me, darling. I beg you. I love you." (She kisses him.) DWIGHT: "You do that again and I swear to hell I'll kill you." Charming. <--sarcasm Anyway, I instantly am filled with revulsion towards her because she's calling herself a slut and begging this guy to love and forgive her. Have some pride! And I already hate Dwight, but I hate him more because he keeps threatening to beat Ava. She's so melodramatic and silly and over-the-top. If I were him, I'd laugh and walk away. But he seems easily caught up in her games. What a moron. He goes to her place and gets the shit kicked out of him. Next thing you know, he comes home and she's naked in his bed. AVA: "But you came for me. You risked your life. You still care. You still want me. And I'm yours. Now. Tonight." DWIGHT: "You make me sick. You and this crazy game you're playing. Get out of my life once and for all or I'll bash your teeth in. Go back to your mansion. Or go to hell. I don't care which." AVA: "Do you want me to beg? Would that amuse you? I'll beg. I'll grovel. I have no shame. I'm nothing. I'm dirt. I'm a lying, treacherous whore who's going to get what I deserve. Oh, for flip's sake. I can't tell you how much I loathe this woman right now. But I must have you first. Tonight. Now, Tonight, and never again. If you can't love me - hate me. If you can't forgive me - punish me." DWIGHT: "Okay." Then Dwight punches Ava in the face. My hatred for him grows to epic proportions. Then he kisses her. Then he starts calling her whore, slut, bitch, cunt. etc. etc. etc. Then they have sex. And suddenly he's in love with her again. He'd do anything for her. Kill for her. It's slowly starting to dawn on me that every single male Miller writes is a complete moron. I mean, it was one thing when it was Marv - I thought his "I love her after having sex with her once and spending exactly 60 minutes conscious with her and 180 unconscious" was just because he was Marv. Sex-deprived, sweet, loyal Marv. But now I know I'm wrong. Apparently Miller believes that all men are complete idiots who will do anything, ANYTHING for a woman who just gave them sex. It's ridiculous, and frankly, insulting to men. Marv and Dwight team up to bring down Ava's allegedly abusive husband. Seeing as Dwight's just punched her in the face, I think she's changing one demon for another, but oh well. Seeing Marv again reminds me what a sweetie-pie he is (for a Miller character) and I wish I was spending this book with him instead of with Dwight. Sigh. So, Dwight murders Damian, Ava's husband. Ava shows up with a gun and starts the evil villain gloating speech - complete with Bwahahahahaha laughter. Really - it goes on for 6 pages. Marv saves a shot-up Dwight, Dwight runs to the whores of Old Town - who apparently owe him one or three. Gail, the BDSM dominatrix from the last book, is completely in love with him. But he doesn't love her. Also, he killed some evil white slaver who was hurting women, and ALSO saved Miho's life. (Every time I see Miho's name - every time - I see it as mi'jo, the shortening Spanish-speakers use when saying "mi hijo", "my son." Sounds exactly the same.) Dwight acts like an asshole with the whores. "I'm staying. You'll stonewall the cops. You'll provide the services of Gail, Miho, and Molly. When I give an order, it will be obeyed." A little politeness costs nothing and goes a long way, Dwight, you dick. And the twins, Wendy and Goldie, are standing over him, threatening him, and he thinks: I should fear for my life, and I would - if I could just get that damn "doublemint" jingle out of my head. Go to hell, Dwight. Oh, and I didn't even tell you about what happened with the cops. So, two cops come to talk to Ava and investigate the murder of her husband. They seem like actual honest, hard-working cops. In Sin City? I'm pleasantly surprised. I'm even happier when Ava lays it on thick to the huge cop (she and Miller both seem to like huge men) and he is just formal with her. His partner asks him if he's gonna tap that. And he's all: I'm a married man, Bob." Wow. I'm happy and proud and shocked. That quickly goes down the tubes when he calls Ava the next day and has sex with her. For no reason I can see. He's married (his wife's beautiful, of course), he didn't seem to be falling for Ava's lies, he's been a cop for a long time. And sure, Ava's gorgeous, but SO ARE 98% OF WOMEN IN SIN CITY. I'm just not buying this. Anyway, of course, because all men are morons according to Miller, the cop is immediately willing to risk his life and his job doing whatever Ava asks him to do and hunt down Dwight and kill him. Since I'm literally laughing out loud every time Ava opens her mouth and spews out her melodramatic performances, I can't for the life of me believe anyone would buy her lies. I don't care HOW good she is in bed, this is ridiculous. ... I won't tell you how it ends, but I will say I was disappointed. In short - Miller believes men are idiots and women are whores. I didn't like the main character. I found the villain ridiculously cheesy. The illustrations are great. The noir tone and over-the-top gestures that worked so well in The Hard Goodbye seem silly and melodramatic here. Mainly because of the Ava character. I didn't enjoy this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    This second Sin City tale is just as fantastic as the first one, but this time it explores the noir femme fatale angle, and does it with real verve, featuring a group of enjoyably deplorable characters. We follow a new protagonist, Dwight, a solitary guy who tries to forget his sordid past by finding work photographing cheating spouses for a private dick. When an old flame comes to him desperate for help, he travels back down the dark alleys that he tried to escape from years ago. There's tons of This second Sin City tale is just as fantastic as the first one, but this time it explores the noir femme fatale angle, and does it with real verve, featuring a group of enjoyably deplorable characters. We follow a new protagonist, Dwight, a solitary guy who tries to forget his sordid past by finding work photographing cheating spouses for a private dick. When an old flame comes to him desperate for help, he travels back down the dark alleys that he tried to escape from years ago. There's tons of action, a hefty amount of sex, seedy locales, crooked betrayals, striking artwork, hookers with guns, and surprising cameos. What's not to like? If you have an even passing interest in hard-boiled writing or noir plots, you owe it to yourself to read this.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    4.5 stars Not quite as good as the first one, but still damn good. 4.5 stars Not quite as good as the first one, but still damn good.

  9. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Man I think more woman in this series are portrayed as prostitutes than not lol. So this is about a new guy in the sin city universe called Dwight and he, just like Marv, aren't very good people. However, when a old lover comes to visit Dwight telling him terrible things are happening to her he decides to help her despite knowing better. IN doing so the twist and turns the characters make ends up in a bloody hell of a time. Good: I enjoyed Dwight as a character, foolish but not completely dumb. Man I think more woman in this series are portrayed as prostitutes than not lol. So this is about a new guy in the sin city universe called Dwight and he, just like Marv, aren't very good people. However, when a old lover comes to visit Dwight telling him terrible things are happening to her he decides to help her despite knowing better. IN doing so the twist and turns the characters make ends up in a bloody hell of a time. Good: I enjoyed Dwight as a character, foolish but not completely dumb. I also enjoyed the first half a lot. Built up pace and the fighting really well. The ending too was satisfying and so far it's 2 for 2 on good endings. Bad: The woman in this series seem either placed for plot points or just always slutty or downright shitty. I guess so are the men but man oh man, need a little inbetween on these. Also the art style still isn't to my liking. It's hard to tell what's happening sometimes even. Overall another solid entry into this series. I've been enjoying them as a good "gritty" style fun. Not as high quality as say Criminal but good old fashion crime fun. A 3 out of 5.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mizuki

    I really like Sin City: A Dame To Kill For the comic with its killer artwork, the gloomy smokey crime-noir atmosphere, the style, the character design, the no-nonsense dialogues. So I checked out the movie trailer for the movie adaptation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvAvE... But......damn...what the hell had I just watched!? The soundtrack is TERRIBLE, the visual is quite DULL comparing with Sin City 1, even with Eva Green as the beautiful, seductive femme fatale, this movie still looks kind I really like Sin City: A Dame To Kill For the comic with its killer artwork, the gloomy smokey crime-noir atmosphere, the style, the character design, the no-nonsense dialogues. So I checked out the movie trailer for the movie adaptation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvAvE... But......damn...what the hell had I just watched!? The soundtrack is TERRIBLE, the visual is quite DULL comparing with Sin City 1, even with Eva Green as the beautiful, seductive femme fatale, this movie still looks kind of SUCKY! Still...the scene with Gail and Dwight are still worth watching. (But I dislike this version of Miho) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iP4n... And the Dwight meets Ava again scene: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85d6G... What a pity, the comic is great, despite of letdowns such as the male lead thinking with his dick instead of his brain for most of the time, the stereotyped Japanese female assassin, and the most stereotyped bad woman, blah blah blah.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    Sin City, Vol. 2: A Dame to Kill For: The ultimate femme fatale Originally posted at Fantasy Literature Frank Miller’s SIN CITY series is famous for its hard-boiled crime noir stories, characters and black-and-white artwork. In the second volume, A Dame To Kill For , Miller gleefully tackles that most classic of noir tropes, the seductive and deadly femme fatale. Ava is her name, and when she beckons, men cannot resist. Our lead this time is Dwight McCarthy, a photographer who is trying to live Sin City, Vol. 2: A Dame to Kill For: The ultimate femme fatale Originally posted at Fantasy Literature Frank Miller’s SIN CITY series is famous for its hard-boiled crime noir stories, characters and black-and-white artwork. In the second volume, A Dame To Kill For , Miller gleefully tackles that most classic of noir tropes, the seductive and deadly femme fatale. Ava is her name, and when she beckons, men cannot resist. Our lead this time is Dwight McCarthy, a photographer who is trying to live a clean, modest life in that cesspool of vice, crime, and violence known as Sin City. But four years ago he was involved with Ava, a dame with a perfect body and hypnotic eyes who can make men do her bidding with ease. But she dumped him for a wealthy and powerful man named Damien Lord, breaking his heart. So when she suddenly calls him and begs to meet him, he knows he should hang up the phone. But he can’t resist the siren’s call, agreeing to meet at a seedy saloon (where Marv happens to doing his usual drinking and brawling). She tells him she needs him and begs to get back together, before a giant bruiser of a chaperone named Manute shows up to tell her it’s time to go back home. The hook has been placed, setting in motion a series of ever more violent confrontations, as Ava lays her web of seduction and manipulation on every man who falls in her crosshairs. The story here is not complicated, so you know what to expect. Dwight is a sympathetic character, a guy who is trying to put his past behind him and control his demons. And of course it’s hard not to like the hapless lug Marv with his own code of justice and disregard for his own safety. So when they team up, it’s fun to see them get nasty with the badguys. But Ava is too stereotyped for my taste, just a completely devious and manipulative type that has men twirled around her fingers. She is constantly in a state of undress throughout the comic, with her voluptuous and naked body on display, made more dramatic with the black and white artwork and play of light and shadows. You can’t fault Frank Miller for admiring the idealized female form, but after dozens of panels of Ava it actually loses its impact, and it’s a fine line between admiration and objectification. The women in A Dame to Kill For are basically all whores, strippers, bar hostesses, or the playthings of rich and powerful men. Ironically, Ava is able to control of these men by offering her body, but it’s a sad sort of power, fully dependent on men. She chafes at this state of affairs, but accepts it as inevitable. The only other version of strong women are the prostitutes of Old Town, who protect their own with their own brand of lethal justice. But they too are dependent on men for their livelihood, which is still selling their bodies. Miller has gotten plenty of flack for his portrayal of women in SIN CITY, and I have to agree. It’s fine to pay tribute to the genre conventions of noir, and focus on the violence and seedy criminal denizens, but he could do a lot more with the female characters than he has in this volume. Movie Version (2014; directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller) Strangely enough, I held off watching this film until I re-read A Dame to Kill For . So having just watched the film, I can say that the main story "A Dame to Kill For" featuring Dwight, Marv, and Ava is very faithfully portrayed. Scene by scene, line by line, the dramatic mono-chromatic atmosphere of the comic comes alive on the screen with some judicious splashes of red blood, green eyes, yellow skin, etc. The classic cars also gets some loving color paint jobs. It’s been nine years since the first film, so there are a number of new actors, most notably Josh Brolin replacing Clive Owens as Dwight, Dennis Haybert replacing Michael Clarke Duncan as Manute. Bruce Willis, Mickey Rourke, and Jessica Alba reprise their roles as John Hartigan, Marv, and Nancy Callahan. It’s a bit ironic that the main story takes place before the “Hard Goodbye” and “A Big Fat Kill” stories of the first film, but the actors are older. Of course Mickey Rourke has no problem since he is covered in heavy facial prosthetics and Jessica Alba still looks great, but Bruce Willis is looking pretty grizzled. The most important newcomer is Eva Green, who plays the ultimate temptress Ava. Knowing that the role requires that Ava be naked or nearly so in at least half the scenes, I’m sure that a number of actresses must have hesitated, but Eva Green has never shied away from that. She certainly attacks the role with intensity and confidence, but I had the same reservations of believability that any femme fatale could so easily manipulate men so completely. But then again, I’ve never been faced by the gorgeous Eva Green smoking a languid cigarette on the bed before me. I’m sure I could resist… The movie features a short opening vignette called “Just Another Saturday Night” from Vol 6 ( Booze, Broads, & Bullets ) in which Marv pursues some badly-behaved college kids into Old Town. It seemed a bit superfluous, and I’m not sure the college kids deserved quite the punishment they got, compared to the usual hardened criminals of Sin City. The most problematic parts of A Dame to Kill are the two new stories “The Long Bad Night (Part 1 & 2)” and “Nancy’s Last Dance”, which were written specially for the film by Frank Miller. The first story is about a young and brash gambler Johnny (played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt), who decides try his luck with the powerful and ruthless Senator Roark (played by Powers Boothe) in the backroom of Kadie’s Bar. After cleaning out Roark, he waltzes out of the bar with a bag full of money and a girl on his arm. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to guess that things will soon turn sour, so I have to question just how stupid Johnny is to think he can antagonize Roark without any backlash. In Part 2, Johnny seeks his revenge on Roark, getting himself in position to challenge him in another poker game. Despite having a special reason for playing with fire again, it’s still mystifying why such a clever gambler would have such a suicidal urge. The second new story, “Nancy’s Last Dance”, takes place after “That Yellow Bastard” in the first film. Nancy is back to dancing at Kadie’s Bar, missing Hartigan and feeling betrayed by him. She turns to drinking and vows revenge on Roark. As everyone in Sin City seems to, she enlists the help of Marv, who is always happy to get involved in fighting and killing. Frankly, this segment just wasn’t that good and made me sad. I have no idea why it was tacked on, as they film could have ended on a better dramatic note with “A Dame to Kill For”. Basically, it seems like the producers wanted to have more scenes of Jessica Alba dancing in a cowboy outfit (understandable), Marv cracking more skulls, and Jessica Alba finally getting to do some shooting and ass-kicking of her own. But it could have been removed with no big loss. Even the fighting seemed a bit tired and predictable.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    If you have seen the Sin City movie, then you have a pretty good idea of what A Dame to Kill For is all about. It's based very closely on the story told here. The Sin City books are known for their stark black and white illustrations, the well-developed plot-lines, and the swagger of noir. This one explores the idea of a femme fatale, Ava. If you have seen the Sin City movie, then you have a pretty good idea of what A Dame to Kill For is all about. It's based very closely on the story told here. The Sin City books are known for their stark black and white illustrations, the well-developed plot-lines, and the swagger of noir. This one explores the idea of a femme fatale, Ava.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lefteris Anagnostopoulos

    Sometimes looking at Frank Miller drawings feels strange, his style is really unique and in my opinion sometimes it's a hit (The Dark Knight Returns, Sin City, 300) and sometimes a miss (The Dark Knight Strikes Again). But I can't imagine Sin City without his drawings, it feels amazing to look at, it's so rich in its simplicity. Even without a prose, Sin City would be a masterpiece. Sometimes looking at Frank Miller drawings feels strange, his style is really unique and in my opinion sometimes it's a hit (The Dark Knight Returns, Sin City, 300) and sometimes a miss (The Dark Knight Strikes Again). But I can't imagine Sin City without his drawings, it feels amazing to look at, it's so rich in its simplicity. Even without a prose, Sin City would be a masterpiece.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    #ThrowbackThursday - Back in the '90s, I used to write comic book reviews for the website of a now-defunct comic book retailer called Rockem Sockem Comics. (Collect them all!) From the June 1998 edition with a theme of "Crime Comics II": INTRODUCTION It's time to return to the mean streets. Yes, let's get down into the gutter with the gray- and black-hearted souls that inhabit the world of crime comics. These are stories told from the criminal's point of view, be he a petty thief or a cold-blooded k #ThrowbackThursday - Back in the '90s, I used to write comic book reviews for the website of a now-defunct comic book retailer called Rockem Sockem Comics. (Collect them all!) From the June 1998 edition with a theme of "Crime Comics II": INTRODUCTION It's time to return to the mean streets. Yes, let's get down into the gutter with the gray- and black-hearted souls that inhabit the world of crime comics. These are stories told from the criminal's point of view, be he a petty thief or a cold-blooded killer. "Crime doesn't pay," goes the old saying, but it sure can entertain. In case the tough guys of ROAD TO PERDITION, STRAY BULLETS, and SIN CITY glorify crime a little too much and give some of my readers inappropriate ideas, I'm throwing in CUCKOO to give everyone a reminder that crime has consequences that echo through society long after the clank of the cell door and the final sizzle of the electric chair have faded away. FROM THE BACKLIST STRAY BULLETS #1-14 (El Capitan) SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR #1-6 (Dark Horse Comics/Legend) Two of the better crime comics being produced today happen to be polar opposites in approach: substance versus style. Comparing David Lapham's STRAY BULLETS to Frank Miller's SIN CITY is not dissimilar from comparing Quentin Tarantino's PULP FICTION to John Woo's FACE/OFF. But hey, I review comics not movies, so I'm not supposed to compare PULP FICTION to FACE/OFF. Instead, I shall compare STRAY BULLETS to PULP FICTION and SIN CITY to FACE/OFF, then compare STRAY BULLETS to SIN CITY. These are all legitimate, comic-centric comparisons. I, the comic reviewer, hereby deny any responsibility for conclusions drawn by readers with an understanding of the transitive property. Though I'm sure Lapham must be sick of the comparison by now, the parallels to be drawn between STRAY BULLETS and PULP FICTION are irresistible to reviewers such as myself. How am I supposed to ignore the fact that two incredibly talented individuals have chosen the same genre and techniques to tell a slew of riveting stories? Both Tarantino and Lapham use non-linear chronology to tell closely interwoven tales of crimes and the people who perpetrate them. Just as Tarantino's three stories jumped hypnotically back and forth through time -- allowing a character killed in the middle of the movie to appear hale and hearty later in the film -- the fourteen issues of STRAY BULLETS skip all over the calendar: starting in 1997 with #1, jumping back to 1977 with #2, and erratically staggering through the late '70s and '80s as Lapham slowly works his way back to the '90s. That Lapham and Tarantino both write rat-a-tat dialogue, create vivid and complex characters, and use shocking violence to maintain a heightened tension simply clinches the comparison for me. Woo and Miller, on the other hand, share more intangible qualities. They are masters of larger-than-life, style-over-substance maelstroms of action and violence. Both employ fantastic plot elements or outlandish coincidences to keep the story racing at a fever pitch, and both feature heroes who, while presented as everyday joes with down-to-earth concerns, are capable of nearly superhuman feats in a running firefight. Both Woo and Miller utilize tough guy talk and action sequences so over-the-top as to nearly fall into the abyss of campiness, but the grim seriousness of the characters and situations keep Woo and Miller from plunging over that edge. Ultimately, the plots and character are secondary to the charged atmosphere and dazzling visuals these two artisans create. Just as Woo redefines action thrillers with his ballet of bullets in FACE/OFF and his earlier films, Miller pushes black-and-white comics to a whole new level with his stark penwork on A DAME TO KILL FOR and his other SIN CITY sagas. Whenever I think of Miller's work on SIN CITY (or any of his other comics for that matter), immediately several extremely cool images pop into my head. Only later do I start dwelling on some interesting bits of dialogue or an engaging plotline. This is probably because Miller started out as a superb artist (DAREDEVIL) and then turned out to be a rather good writer and writer/artist (DAREDEVIL, ELEKTRA, BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT RETURNS, BATMAN: YEAR ONE). On the other hand, when I think of STRAY BULLETS I immediately start thinking of the characters and the plot. This is probably because Lapham started out as a good artist (SHADOWMAN, HARBINGER, RAI, WARRIORS OF PLASM) and then turned out to be a rather superb writer . . . though still only a good artist. STRAY BULLETS began with a bang. Come to think of it, STRAY BULLETS #1 may be the one of the best first issues ever, telling a chilling and brutal tale of murder, insanity, and unrequited love. I don't want to tell any more about it, for fear of ruining it for any newbies in the audience. Suffice it to say, the story is set in 1997 and features a character, Joey, who appears as a boy throughout the rest of the series. In some ways, the series is about this lad and the unfortunate events that shape the man he becomes. The main character of STRAY BULLETS, however, is Virginia Applejack. Introduced as a young girl, Virginia's life becomes a long sequence of escalating troubles after witnessing an alleyway murder. Schoolyard violence, sexual molestation, domestic abuse, and family tragedy all contribute to Virginia's need to run away from home. Her wanderings bring her into contact with Orson, Beth and Nina. This trio, whose backstory gets as much "screen time" as Virginia's, consists of three young, confused adults on the lam from a crime boss and his thugs with two suitcases of stolen cocaine. Obviously, involvement with the trio is not going to improve Virginia's quality of life. Virginia's only outlet from her awful reality is through stories she writes of her futuristic outlaw doppelganger, Amy Racecar. (Feature-length Amy Racecar stories appear in issues #6, #10 and a color special.) For me, the point of the series boils down to one question: Will Amy Racecar and Virginia's own sensibility keep Virginia from travelling the same troubled path as Joey? The story in SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR is not nearly as hard to describe. A down-on-his-luck photographer, Dwight McCarthy is lured by a married ex-girlfriend into a plot full of sex, betrayal, murder and more betrayal. I'm talking tons of hot babes and hotter action here, boys. Literally every other issue features defenestration. (Before those without dictionaries get too hot and bothered, I should point out that defenestration is an act of violence and not a sex act.) For fans of the original SIN CITY mini-series, its protagonist Marv shows up in a supporting role since A DAME TO KILL FOR takes place in time just before and during the events of Marv's own ultra-violent feature. The story is actually pretty irrelevant, but the artwork looks amazing, the narration features wonderfully hard-boiled monologues, and the dialogue is crisp and biting. While the plot is not entirely riveting, Miller's obvious love for the material is sufficiently compelling. Visceral or cerebral? Which is your pleasure? Frankly, I want them both whenever possible. For me, that's why PULP FICT- . . . um, STRAY BULLETS, I mean, wins in this showdown. Sure FACE/O- . . . ahem, SIN CITY is exciting to look at while I'm reading it, but once I've put it away in a box I don't dwell on it. STRAY BULLETS, however, stays with me. It has the thrills and violence to keep me on the edge of my seat while I'm reading it, it has the complexity that challenges me to unravel its secrets, and it has the themes and ideas which linger in my brain long into the night. Now, if only Frank Miller would consent to draw STRAY BULLETS under Lapham's scripting I think I'd be in heaven. (Tarantino and Woo together might not be too bad either . . . ) STRAY BULLETS Grade: A+ SIN CITY: A DAME TO KILL FOR Grade: B

  15. 4 out of 5

    André

    In this second volume, Frank Miller presents us with another tale from Sin City. "A Dame to kill" centres around a love story, but, Sin city style: Betrayal, faithlessness, adultery, lies, street violence, gangs of prostitutes, and strippers are the main components for this black and white (or white and black) tale. The story starts with Dwight McCarthy, (one of the main characters of Miller's universe) who reunites with Ava Green, a woman who broke Dwight's heart four years ago by running off w In this second volume, Frank Miller presents us with another tale from Sin City. "A Dame to kill" centres around a love story, but, Sin city style: Betrayal, faithlessness, adultery, lies, street violence, gangs of prostitutes, and strippers are the main components for this black and white (or white and black) tale. The story starts with Dwight McCarthy, (one of the main characters of Miller's universe) who reunites with Ava Green, a woman who broke Dwight's heart four years ago by running off with another richer man. In a seedy bar called Kadie's Club Pecos where both Dwight and Ava are reunited, Ava tries to convince Dwight to take her back, claiming that her life is "a living Hell", but with no success. Ava's husband's valet arrives and takes Ava away. Marv, another important key role, is also there and greets Dwight. After witnessing the scene, Marv states that Ava is definitely "a dame to kill for". Dwight, the protagonist doesn't forget his old lover, and he will return back to Ava's home to check on her. Ava is more than a simple dame. She's utterly problematic, manipulative, and deadly. Consequently, this love story will take new dimensions when Dwight and Marv will tag team to face the upcoming events caused by this lady. Dwight and Ava Miller's second volume brings additional details about the tainted town that attracts so many people to sin. Aristocratic and influential characters take part in the action of this tale, as well as mad prostitute gangs who hate the Police. Marv, the protagonist of the first volume, has a second-hand role, but at the same time, an important role that backs-up Dwight in his personal tale. The classic Nancy couldn't miss too! Dwight's journey regarding her "dame" is a flammable tale between love and hate. Manipulative and Dangerous, Ava, the dame, is just another victim of this rotten town, Sin City. Rating: 4.5/5 stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dimitra

    Another amazing piece of art! To be honest, I almost don't care about the story. I just LOVE the artwork! Stunning and haunting!!! Another amazing piece of art! To be honest, I almost don't care about the story. I just LOVE the artwork! Stunning and haunting!!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    abatage

    It seems that Sin City is populated by noir stereotypes. All the men are plagued with aggression and will do anything for a dame, while all the women are calculating and trade sex for favours. With this in mind, I like to think that everyone who reads these books can have a laugh and consider how hyper-real Sin City actually is - the notion that the clear male/female dichotomy is something to be learned, might be a frightening one. However, when viewed as the stylised hyper-reality that it is, Si It seems that Sin City is populated by noir stereotypes. All the men are plagued with aggression and will do anything for a dame, while all the women are calculating and trade sex for favours. With this in mind, I like to think that everyone who reads these books can have a laugh and consider how hyper-real Sin City actually is - the notion that the clear male/female dichotomy is something to be learned, might be a frightening one. However, when viewed as the stylised hyper-reality that it is, Sin City executes itself brilliantly. The story in this book is complex enough to be interesting, but more from just wanting to see it play out, rather than trying to figure out what's going to happen. There are even frequent snippets of story-cross-over from the first book, which manages to place this tale within the broader context of Sin City. There's a definite sense of something larger here, which may also come from recognising characters that were in the film, but are still to come in the book series. Sure it's a little bit predictable and the melodrama of brutes and broads tends to hit a single note, but it's done well enough not to matter. Sin City is a dark and deviant place, which is growing and deepening with this second volume... now I can't wait for the third!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    The Sin City movie is literally the only film in the huge mass of comic book movies that have been made lately that is an improvement on the graphic novels. I enjoy Frank Miller's signature art style, all the black drips and angles, but his writing is just terrible. Lines that were charmingly campy and over-the-top in the movie, are juvenile and awkward in print. The Sin City movie is literally the only film in the huge mass of comic book movies that have been made lately that is an improvement on the graphic novels. I enjoy Frank Miller's signature art style, all the black drips and angles, but his writing is just terrible. Lines that were charmingly campy and over-the-top in the movie, are juvenile and awkward in print.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Inzirillo

    Dwight has an interesting story. I like how Miller overlaps this with Marv. Little scenes here and there that show the back story of the big guy. Miller's noir storytelling is amazing. Dwight has an interesting story. I like how Miller overlaps this with Marv. Little scenes here and there that show the back story of the big guy. Miller's noir storytelling is amazing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dávid Novotný

    This story focuses more on femme fatale aspect, all works great, and it's nice to see how pieces of previous story are unwinding in the background. 4,5* This story focuses more on femme fatale aspect, all works great, and it's nice to see how pieces of previous story are unwinding in the background. 4,5*

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    This chapter was a glorious manifesto of manipulation, sacrifice, sex and violence. Eva is pure evil - I dont think she even has a soul. Like a siren she draws men in and then controls them like toys. They will steal, lie, cheat, kill and die for her even though they know they mean nothing to her. The contrast between the purity the name "Eva" symbolizes and the malice of her as a character was brilliant. I loved watching the main character struggle with him self in his quest for inner freedom. This chapter was a glorious manifesto of manipulation, sacrifice, sex and violence. Eva is pure evil - I dont think she even has a soul. Like a siren she draws men in and then controls them like toys. They will steal, lie, cheat, kill and die for her even though they know they mean nothing to her. The contrast between the purity the name "Eva" symbolizes and the malice of her as a character was brilliant. I loved watching the main character struggle with him self in his quest for inner freedom. He loves and hates her. He loves and hates himself. Hes trying to stay sober but his inner demons wont stop knocking on his door. Overall excellent.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Frank Miller may be the ultimate storyboard artist. His comics are stark black and white sketches with little dialogue involved. The plot is laid out like a basic outline and there’s nothing wrong with that, but by no means does he deserve the genius tag some people give him. “A Dame To Kill For” is a pretty cool drink of noir erotica, but it’s pretty stark stuff and not too deep. Not bad, but nothing that’ll frighten the horses..

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julio Bonilla

    If a woman wants something, she will manipulate men to get what she wants. Love corrupts men! This sequel is definitely better than the original, not to mention, reminiscent of my late teenage years of going back to a strip club. Fresh air is the cure! Wu Xia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Garden

    This one is just like my life. Cats, sandwiches, murder, treachery . . . the bathtub . . . yeah. I can really identify.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    This was just like the movie....so beautiful, so intense and so good. Frank Miller is the man. https://youtu.be/6ICtvJiwsWc This was just like the movie....so beautiful, so intense and so good. Frank Miller is the man. https://youtu.be/6ICtvJiwsWc

  26. 5 out of 5

    Victor

    The whole noir genre should move to comics and leave the many words to lesser people.

  27. 4 out of 5

    TraceyL

    Reread from high school. I just don't care about the Ava character. Dwight is much better later in the series. This is the most forgettable book in the series for me. Reread from high school. I just don't care about the Ava character. Dwight is much better later in the series. This is the most forgettable book in the series for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rob McMonigal

    The end of my review for Volume 1 was "It's great stuff, I hope the rest is even close to being this good." Fortunately, I was not a bit disappointed. This time around, we follow Dwight, a man who had a great fall and has tried to live a better life, albeit one that still deals in the smut and dirty-dealing of life in Sin City and its environs. When a woman from his past comes back with one hell of a sob story, will he stay strong? Or fall right back into the abyss he thought he'd managed to craw The end of my review for Volume 1 was "It's great stuff, I hope the rest is even close to being this good." Fortunately, I was not a bit disappointed. This time around, we follow Dwight, a man who had a great fall and has tried to live a better life, albeit one that still deals in the smut and dirty-dealing of life in Sin City and its environs. When a woman from his past comes back with one hell of a sob story, will he stay strong? Or fall right back into the abyss he thought he'd managed to crawl out of in the first place? This is Sin City; you know the answer before you start. As Dwight's life gets worse, Miller adds a nice touch--Marv shows up. You remember Marv; he was #$%#$%# stuff up and taking names in volume one. There's even a bit of that in here, too, showing that Miller has put together an entire world, not just a set of isolated stories. He also sneaks in a few references to Hellboy and Elektra, too. Heh. Just as things look bad for Dwight, he finds a way to use the depths to which his life can plummet into an advantage. But will it be enough when facing a dame to kill for? It's hard to review this one without giving away too much of the lovely twists and turns that Miller plants in the storyline. The only thing I will say is that just when you think that the storyline is headed distinctly in a certain direction, Miller yanks it another way. He also continues to use the stark black-and-white style to amazing effect, though with perhaps a bit too much nudity this time. Characters like Agamemnon pop off the page with their distinctive stylings and Marv is an absolute treat of a character. I hope we keep getting to see him. Sin City is the type of world you certainly wouldn't want to live in, and the actions of the characters are out there, even for a dark world like this one. But as I said before--because of the world Miller has built, everything feels natural. The art is not quite as good this time--I didn't want to ogle the pages every few minutes--but it still fits the material nicely. There's also a distinct improvement in the way the women react in this world, which made me quite happy. Still a violent book, I can give this a complete recommendation for those who don't mind the gory details of a gory world. Highly recommended! (Library, 05/08)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Celine

    Summary: Dwight holds a tight control over his inner monster - he doesn't drink, plays by the rules and stays out of trouble. But then Ava comes back into his life, a woman that broke his heart. When she tells him she's in danger, his control starts to slip. What I liked: - There were some nice twists in the story that I didn't see coming - The art sometimes has a kind of cut-out quality that looks pretty awesome; though everything is done in black and white there is still plenty of detailing - A Da Summary: Dwight holds a tight control over his inner monster - he doesn't drink, plays by the rules and stays out of trouble. But then Ava comes back into his life, a woman that broke his heart. When she tells him she's in danger, his control starts to slip. What I liked: - There were some nice twists in the story that I didn't see coming - The art sometimes has a kind of cut-out quality that looks pretty awesome; though everything is done in black and white there is still plenty of detailing - A Dame to Kill For happens during the happenings of The Hard Goodbye. This means we get some more glimpses of Marv, my favourite Sin City character - Many boobs, but rather clean sex scenes - Although they only get a small role, the hookers of Old Town are cool ladies What I didn't like: - I feel like we've seen this story before. It's the same old song: guy is being hunky and dark, woman comes in, dies/asks for his help, guy kills a dozen other guys for said woman - Marv was adorable in a way, Dwight didn't have anything going for him - The violence often seems to have no other goal than to shock the reader - Because I didn't care for Dwight I didn't feel invested in the story Verdict: A Dame to Kill For suffers severely from second-book sydrome. Its plot is too close to that of The Hard Goodbye and doesn't add anything to it. It was okay, but I'm not sure whether I want to read the other Sin City novels

  30. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    Dwight is a wounded man staying low, making money taking secret lewd photo shoots for divorce attorneys vis his obese 'partner' and agent. Dwight has only two problems drink and women, so he avoids them like the plague... that is until he finds his heartbreaker and betrayer of an Ex, laying naked in his flat? You have entered Sin City. Dwight might need some backup. . . Miller's neo-noir reality takes a hardcore look a the female of the species, albeit a black widow. There's some sublime crossovers Dwight is a wounded man staying low, making money taking secret lewd photo shoots for divorce attorneys vis his obese 'partner' and agent. Dwight has only two problems drink and women, so he avoids them like the plague... that is until he finds his heartbreaker and betrayer of an Ex, laying naked in his flat? You have entered Sin City. Dwight might need some backup. . . Miller's neo-noir reality takes a hardcore look a the female of the species, albeit a black widow. There's some sublime crossovers with the first volume, more shockingly great monochrome and shadows art, some off-key violence and a nice neo-noirish plot. Not as big a shock as the first volume, but some assured Sin City world building. 8 out of 12.

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