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Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy

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Long before we ventured into outer space or explored the most remote regions of the planet, writers have spun stories of what might lie in those unknown worlds, or what awaits humanity in the future. Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy is a collection of ten novels and short stories that blazed the trail for the popular genre. Works by acclaimed authors such as Jule Long before we ventured into outer space or explored the most remote regions of the planet, writers have spun stories of what might lie in those unknown worlds, or what awaits humanity in the future. Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy is a collection of ten novels and short stories that blazed the trail for the popular genre. Works by acclaimed authors such as Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jack London, and H. P. Lovecraft will transport the reader to distant places and times—and set the imagination ablaze!


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Long before we ventured into outer space or explored the most remote regions of the planet, writers have spun stories of what might lie in those unknown worlds, or what awaits humanity in the future. Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy is a collection of ten novels and short stories that blazed the trail for the popular genre. Works by acclaimed authors such as Jule Long before we ventured into outer space or explored the most remote regions of the planet, writers have spun stories of what might lie in those unknown worlds, or what awaits humanity in the future. Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy is a collection of ten novels and short stories that blazed the trail for the popular genre. Works by acclaimed authors such as Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jack London, and H. P. Lovecraft will transport the reader to distant places and times—and set the imagination ablaze!

30 review for Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Henry Herz

    Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy is an anthology reprinting of, well, science fiction and fantasy stories from the period 1858 to 1928. Ten stories are included. I like the fact that the editor chose a mix of very well known and somewhat less known stories. Old familiar favorites like Verne's A Journey to the Center of the Earth, Wells's The War of the Worlds, Burroughs's A Princess of Mars, and Doyle's The Lost World, were leavened with stories I hadn't yet read, although the author's Classic Tales of Science Fiction & Fantasy is an anthology reprinting of, well, science fiction and fantasy stories from the period 1858 to 1928. Ten stories are included. I like the fact that the editor chose a mix of very well known and somewhat less known stories. Old familiar favorites like Verne's A Journey to the Center of the Earth, Wells's The War of the Worlds, Burroughs's A Princess of Mars, and Doyle's The Lost World, were leavened with stories I hadn't yet read, although the author's names were familiar: London's The Scarlet Plague and Lovecraft's The Dunwich Horror, for example. It was nice to discover some early works from the fathers of science fiction and fantasy. Too bad Shelley's Frankenstein wasn't in there as well. While the copyright-expired stories can be accessed online at Project Gutenberg, the physical packaging of this anthology definitely adds value. It sturdy cover with old-fashioned art complements the contents. It also has lovely end papers, gold leaf on the page edges, and an integrated ribbon bookmark, which together make this a good-looking book worthy of a place on fans' bookshelves.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This huge book is a hodgepodge of some well-known sci-fi and fantasy tales, with some lesser known ones. The editors arranged them in order of publication, which also makes this book an interesting glimpse into the progression of fantasy/sci-fi through the mid-nineteeth to early twentieth century. With all the racist and sexist attitudes from those times, unfortunately. Thankfully some are better than others. The Diamond Lens by Fitz James O'Brian (1858): The opening story shows us a young man ob This huge book is a hodgepodge of some well-known sci-fi and fantasy tales, with some lesser known ones. The editors arranged them in order of publication, which also makes this book an interesting glimpse into the progression of fantasy/sci-fi through the mid-nineteeth to early twentieth century. With all the racist and sexist attitudes from those times, unfortunately. Thankfully some are better than others. The Diamond Lens by Fitz James O'Brian (1858): The opening story shows us a young man obsessed with microscopy who stumbles across the secret to create the world's most powerful lens, which leads to an unexpected discovery. Really reminded me of Edgar Allan Poe, right up until the ending when I think the author looked at his watch and realized he was late for something important? Content warnings for murder. A Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne (1864): The classic sci-fi tale of the professor and his nephew who decipher a text from a mysterious Iceland/ic explorer and embark on a trek to the planet's core is one of my favourites. Looking Backward: 2000-1887 by Edward Bellamy (1888): Less a story and more a “Communism: You Should Try It!” instructional pamphlet. If pamphlets were 150 pages long. I struggled to get through this one, but it was interesting to read a story about one author's vision of the world over 100 years in the future, which is set 17 years in our past. The things Bellamy assumed would change (which mainly didn't), and the things he assumed would stay the same (which mainly haven't), and the changes he didn't predict made for a unique take. Not quite enough to make up for the dullness of the plot, but I gave him extra points for effort. Even if it wasn't his doing. The War of the Worlds by HG Wells (1897): Another fantastic sci-fi classic. Wells' tale of a Martian invasion – and its unexpected resolution – is something everyone should read. A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs (1912): Opening the “John Carter of Mars” series by the author of Tarzan is this action-filled novel where the main character discovers a mysterious cave which transports him instantaneously to an inhabited Mars. Fortunately it has a breathable atmosphere or this would have been a very short series. The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle (1912): The original Jurassic Park, with dinosaurs and egos larger than life. The Scarlet Plague by Jack London (1915): Did not live up to the high hopes I had for it, after having read White Fang and The Call of the Wild. A multi-generational band of apocalypse survivors roaming the States listens to its oldest member reminiscing about the disease that nearly ended the world. Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1915): Tied with Looking Backward for worst title, but a far better plot. Wealthy, mismatched college students chasing a rumoured all-women society bite off more than they can chew when they find that society and think they can just waltz in and be the cock of the rock. Content warnings for sexual assault. Armageddon 2419 A.D. by Philip Francis Nowlan (1928): In this extravagently racist tale, Nowlan imagines the second World War will be everyone ganging up on America...because industry? Who knows, because now China rules everything and only a few stalwart forest bands stand between us and total moral degredation in a society where ease and luxury abound (and that's bad). Super duper racist, but not as sexist as you would think for 1928. Overall an interesting story, despite the somewhat unbelievable premise. The Dunwich Horror by HP Lovecraft (1928): Classic Lovecraftian fantasy has this small town attacked by an interdimensional monstrosity whose origins may be alarmingly local. A great story for when you feel like something creepy. Content warnings for animal mutilation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    I am very happy they decided to do a series of books of the great authors and their timeless tales. I recommend these books to every bookworm young and old.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    3.5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deana Hamilton-Grummons

    Really enjoyed The Scarlet Plague and The Dunwich Horror from this collection.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Constructionv4

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  8. 5 out of 5

    Roland's Library

  9. 5 out of 5

    Holly Nachtigal

  10. 5 out of 5

    Apostolos

  11. 4 out of 5

    Emersyn

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fernanda

  13. 5 out of 5

    Olga Sergushova

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andreas Schweitzer

  17. 4 out of 5

    Buster; the book beast

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael Schulz

  19. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  21. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  22. 5 out of 5

    Helena

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Steele

  25. 4 out of 5

    Doug Ohmer

  26. 5 out of 5

    LilyZ11

  27. 5 out of 5

    A

  28. 5 out of 5

    Matthias

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  30. 4 out of 5

    X

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