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The Merchant of Venice: A Graphic Novel

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With elegant, contemporary artwork and a faithful but succinct adaptation, this graphic novel casts a classic drama in a provocative new light. Here is the tale of young Bassanio, who, to win the love of fair Portia, entangles his dearest friend, Antonio, in a dangerous bargain with the moneylender Shylock. Only Bassanio’s heartfelt efforts — and a clever intervention by Po With elegant, contemporary artwork and a faithful but succinct adaptation, this graphic novel casts a classic drama in a provocative new light. Here is the tale of young Bassanio, who, to win the love of fair Portia, entangles his dearest friend, Antonio, in a dangerous bargain with the moneylender Shylock. Only Bassanio’s heartfelt efforts — and a clever intervention by Portia — will save Antonio from paying Shylock "a pound of flesh." Moody and mesmerizing, this graphic novel adaptation of one of Shakespeare’s more controversial plays boasts a chic modern cast, high drama, and all the dark, familiar beauty of Venice.


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With elegant, contemporary artwork and a faithful but succinct adaptation, this graphic novel casts a classic drama in a provocative new light. Here is the tale of young Bassanio, who, to win the love of fair Portia, entangles his dearest friend, Antonio, in a dangerous bargain with the moneylender Shylock. Only Bassanio’s heartfelt efforts — and a clever intervention by Po With elegant, contemporary artwork and a faithful but succinct adaptation, this graphic novel casts a classic drama in a provocative new light. Here is the tale of young Bassanio, who, to win the love of fair Portia, entangles his dearest friend, Antonio, in a dangerous bargain with the moneylender Shylock. Only Bassanio’s heartfelt efforts — and a clever intervention by Portia — will save Antonio from paying Shylock "a pound of flesh." Moody and mesmerizing, this graphic novel adaptation of one of Shakespeare’s more controversial plays boasts a chic modern cast, high drama, and all the dark, familiar beauty of Venice.

30 review for The Merchant of Venice: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica {Litnoob}

    These two stars are entirely for this edition and making this horrible story palatable and understandable. Because this actual story line is horrific. So this modern art style and the ease of understanding the story is what gets two stars. The story gets zero stars since negative stars isn’t an option. This is a story about rich white people who steal $3000 from a Jewish man, and then proceed to call him “Jew” the whole time instead of his name while also stealing his fortune in court because the These two stars are entirely for this edition and making this horrible story palatable and understandable. Because this actual story line is horrific. So this modern art style and the ease of understanding the story is what gets two stars. The story gets zero stars since negative stars isn’t an option. This is a story about rich white people who steal $3000 from a Jewish man, and then proceed to call him “Jew” the whole time instead of his name while also stealing his fortune in court because the rich white folks couldn’t pay their debts. It’s the trashiest most horrible story I’ve ever read and I’m an american privy to so many racist ass tales. But this is bad, bad bad.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Merchant of Venice has never been my favorite play - smug Portia, gloomy Antonio, is it racist or is it a comment on racism: whatever, Shakespeare - but this condensation by Gareth Hinds is skilfully done. And I personally like this drawing style - I like Eddie Campbell too - though I know that some people find it a bit drab. Can't get past not liking the play, though. Why's it even called The Merchant of Venice, instead of being called The Merchant of Venice's Lovesick Friends? Merchant of Venice has never been my favorite play - smug Portia, gloomy Antonio, is it racist or is it a comment on racism: whatever, Shakespeare - but this condensation by Gareth Hinds is skilfully done. And I personally like this drawing style - I like Eddie Campbell too - though I know that some people find it a bit drab. Can't get past not liking the play, though. Why's it even called The Merchant of Venice, instead of being called The Merchant of Venice's Lovesick Friends?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Wetterling

    The author follows the modernist fallacy that the play is about racism. For example, in summarizing Shylock's thoughts on Antonio, the author suggestively leaves out "I hate him for his is a Christian". He also misrepresents Antonio's desire to have a loan between enemies - not so that he can "collect whatever usurious interest pleases your Jew heart" but that "thou mayst with better face exact the penalty" -- with no mention of race. Later, Shylock's anti-Christian comment about Barrabas is exp The author follows the modernist fallacy that the play is about racism. For example, in summarizing Shylock's thoughts on Antonio, the author suggestively leaves out "I hate him for his is a Christian". He also misrepresents Antonio's desire to have a loan between enemies - not so that he can "collect whatever usurious interest pleases your Jew heart" but that "thou mayst with better face exact the penalty" -- with no mention of race. Later, Shylock's anti-Christian comment about Barrabas is expunged, replaced with the more benign word "thief" (on page 48). That said, this erroneous view is so common today as to effectively exonerate the artist. On to the good... Portia's comment about complexion in page 18 is accurate to the play, and the author here does nothing untoward with it. (It's unfortunately easy to misconstrue as racism -- a desire that anyone of the Moroccan's skin tone fail to win her hand -- whereas Shakespeare is using "complexion" in the sense of an attitude or character rather than a color.) The artist, to his credit, includes her witty reply (on page 10) that "you are as pleasing as any other suitor". Further to the artist's credit, Antonio stands at trial bravely, as Shakespeare wrote him. Best executed is Portia's "tarry not" (or "wait a moment" in this rendition) during the trial. The artist resisted any temptation to excess, and her delivery reads as calm and collected as it should. Additionally, Shylock's puzzled expression at the bottom of page 51 is masterfully done. The background changes between scenes are subtle but effective in drawing the reader from one scene to the next. Regarding Portia, I don't envy the artist this challenge. She is meant to be so beautiful (on top of other less visual positives) as the inspire men to "hazard all they have", and yet she must pass effectively as a male doctor of law during the trial. His Portia is more pretty a man than handsome a woman, and that's tipping the balance in the right direction. The beginning of the author's note, though, spends some of the credit. The play is neither evidence of Shakespeare's racism nor his commentary on racism. The alleged homosexual overtones are nowhere to be found (except, perhaps, in a misreading of the humor of the final scene). Shylock, in fact, shows up neither in the trial of the caskets or that of the rings, and the play is not about him. Happily, the author maintains the three major points of the story, of which Shylock's court case is but one, and he maintains, as well, the humorous and happy ending. As he says, the modernization of the setting is not a new idea, though he executes it better (read: less intrusively) than most productions that make the same choice. He admits to the need to make cuts for a book of this length, and cutting Launcelot and his father, rather than, say, the ending, was a far better editorial choice. ==================== A few words about misunderstood content: Critics often focus on Antonio's insults of Shylock while paying no mind that Shylock's terms are that he carve the flesh out of a man. Further, on page 19, what do we make of a man that holds his daughter and his money in equal regard? Shylock takes advantage of the poor (a usurer), treats his daughter like property, and plans to carve up an enemy. Shylock is clearly the villain of this story. The "give him a noose" line is also easy to misconstrue. It's delivered by Gratiano, the sharpest-tongued of the group, and has the sense of a sarcastic and triumphal "I could loan you a rope" rather than a violent "string him up". I recommend Joseph Pearce's excellent Through Shakespeare's Eyes for more about the understanding of the play that the original author would have had, including the real identity of Shylock.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Parry Papamihalakis

    I really enjoyed this graphic novel adaption of The Merchant of Venice. I would have loved to read this before I actually read the Shakespeare play! It makes it really easy to understand everything! The modern setting makes it easy to connect with and the way the dialect goes from modern English to Shakespearean English, you don't realize that you're reading Shakespearean English till the end! I give it an A+ and I'd totally recommend it in ANY classroom!! I really enjoyed this graphic novel adaption of The Merchant of Venice. I would have loved to read this before I actually read the Shakespeare play! It makes it really easy to understand everything! The modern setting makes it easy to connect with and the way the dialect goes from modern English to Shakespearean English, you don't realize that you're reading Shakespearean English till the end! I give it an A+ and I'd totally recommend it in ANY classroom!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy Layton

    I always love graphic novel interpretations of Shakespeare's work, and this one is no different!  Set closer to modern day, and with a mixture of modern day prose and Shakespeare's original text, Hinds blends past and present to make all the various layers both visible and intermingled.  Illustrated with monotone colors, it almost appears as though this is some sort of old movie, and such a style really works with this tale--there's finance deals, marriages, costumes, court scenes.   Some additio I always love graphic novel interpretations of Shakespeare's work, and this one is no different!  Set closer to modern day, and with a mixture of modern day prose and Shakespeare's original text, Hinds blends past and present to make all the various layers both visible and intermingled.  Illustrated with monotone colors, it almost appears as though this is some sort of old movie, and such a style really works with this tale--there's finance deals, marriages, costumes, court scenes.   Some additional cool things about this is that Hinds also addresses many of his choices in an afterword, and provides a cast list to match with faces.  Overall, this is a fun edition that I think would easily help people understand Shakespeare better, especially given the mixture of modern day and original text.  Definitely worth a read! Review cross-listed here!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    What a bummer. Good art though.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I love Gareth Hinds' work -- his adaptation of Beowulf is one of the most spectacular I've ever seen. He worked from live models for this update of Shakespeare's play, and does a great job streamlining the story, without losing much. One of the things I like the most about this version is that Hinds starts the book by simplifying Shakespeare's original language (Portia even replies, "Good one" at one point). But as the novel moves on, he gradually includes more and more of the original text, so I love Gareth Hinds' work -- his adaptation of Beowulf is one of the most spectacular I've ever seen. He worked from live models for this update of Shakespeare's play, and does a great job streamlining the story, without losing much. One of the things I like the most about this version is that Hinds starts the book by simplifying Shakespeare's original language (Portia even replies, "Good one" at one point). But as the novel moves on, he gradually includes more and more of the original text, so by the time the play reaches the courtroom scenes, much of the dialogue is in Shakespearean English. It's subtle, but it will help readers unfamiliar with the text to ease into the story and characters. Well adapted and beautifully illustrated.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    Hinds takes the text of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice and gives it a whole new outlook by pairing the text with illustrations of the characters in modern clothes, looking like they all could be walking down a New York sidewalk, done with Wall Street for the day and off to Brooklyn for a nosh. The text has been abbreviated, so this could make for a good introduction to the story for someone first approaching it – especially in how Hinds ruthlessly exploits the modern setting to underscore t Hinds takes the text of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice and gives it a whole new outlook by pairing the text with illustrations of the characters in modern clothes, looking like they all could be walking down a New York sidewalk, done with Wall Street for the day and off to Brooklyn for a nosh. The text has been abbreviated, so this could make for a good introduction to the story for someone first approaching it – especially in how Hinds ruthlessly exploits the modern setting to underscore the point that we still today grapple with issues of fear and anger towards the Other. A short version of the play – but still with plenty to say about both Then and Now.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    As with his Romeo and Juliet, which to his credit does look different than either his Merchant or his far better Beowulf (so he's trying different styles and approaches for different stories), I much preferred his lyrical approach to Beowulf where his artwork conveys the story. Here the art work is functional. I like Kurosawa's Throne of Blood as a pretty free adaptation of Macbeth, which at great risk loses the great language for the stunning visuals. Hinds should use the graph format to focus As with his Romeo and Juliet, which to his credit does look different than either his Merchant or his far better Beowulf (so he's trying different styles and approaches for different stories), I much preferred his lyrical approach to Beowulf where his artwork conveys the story. Here the art work is functional. I like Kurosawa's Throne of Blood as a pretty free adaptation of Macbeth, which at great risk loses the great language for the stunning visuals. Hinds should use the graph format to focus on the visuals more. Still, if you were teaching Merchant, you'd use this book, I'd think.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Sainsbury

    GRAPHIC NOVEL REQUIREMENT Hinds has many Shakespeare plays he has turned into graphic novels, and never having read a graphic novel before, I decided that this would be a fitting way to ease into the genre. I enjoyed the play Merchant of Venice, and it was fun to reread a modern emendation (with pictures even)! Hinds includes an Author's Note in the back that explains his decision for setting this version in modernity, which was to show anti-Semitism and slavery as incongruous, even alien with to GRAPHIC NOVEL REQUIREMENT Hinds has many Shakespeare plays he has turned into graphic novels, and never having read a graphic novel before, I decided that this would be a fitting way to ease into the genre. I enjoyed the play Merchant of Venice, and it was fun to reread a modern emendation (with pictures even)! Hinds includes an Author's Note in the back that explains his decision for setting this version in modernity, which was to show anti-Semitism and slavery as incongruous, even alien with today's progression of society from that of the Shakespearean era. I thought this was a wonderful change and completed the motive. As a teacher, I am excited with the new idea to use graphic novels in my classroom. Not only to expose my students to different genres, but also to teach difficult texts, like Shakespearean ones. I think that the pictures added understanding, as well as what the author chose to cut out, helped to simplify difficult scenes to make sense of (such as the court scene). The expressions included on the character's faces added to the emotion of the story even more. The underlying tones and themes were also explicated by this as well.

  11. 4 out of 5

    MeleahBazen

    This book freaked me out a little bit. It is a controversial story of an economic quarrel between one Jew and several Christians. It is hard to tell in the story whether the original author, Shakespeare, was anti-Christian or anti-Semitic. It was also hard to tell in the beginning exactly what was going on. This is the first graphic novel I have read, so the format made it hard for me to figure out characters, plot, and the problem until later in the book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    I'm torn. This is a good adaptation of the play, well-edited and updated for the format. On the other hand, the play itself. It is incredibly, shockingly anti-Semitic. I honestly don't see any other way to read this, to interpret the character of Shylock, and to justify the way he is treated. There doesn't appear to be anything to support the claim that Shakespeare was trying to present Shylock as sympathetic other than a desperate need to be a Bard apologist. I'm torn. This is a good adaptation of the play, well-edited and updated for the format. On the other hand, the play itself. It is incredibly, shockingly anti-Semitic. I honestly don't see any other way to read this, to interpret the character of Shylock, and to justify the way he is treated. There doesn't appear to be anything to support the claim that Shakespeare was trying to present Shylock as sympathetic other than a desperate need to be a Bard apologist.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Perlie

    This story is not really a graphic novel. It's more like a highly abridged and improbably modernized retelling of Merchant. That Shylock is drawn with stereotypically Jewish features does make the story disturbing in a more contemporary way; ditto for Jessica, who looks like a NY undergrad of Semitic heritage. Here and there some of the famous soliloquys creep in, but over all the text itself is jarring. This story is not really a graphic novel. It's more like a highly abridged and improbably modernized retelling of Merchant. That Shylock is drawn with stereotypically Jewish features does make the story disturbing in a more contemporary way; ditto for Jessica, who looks like a NY undergrad of Semitic heritage. Here and there some of the famous soliloquys creep in, but over all the text itself is jarring.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tandava Graham

    Compared to Hinds’s other adaptations I’ve read so far, this one is even more abridged and edited. Portia’s first scene has a couple particularly glaringly out-of-place lines, though most of the book flowed reasonably well. The art is very different, and some of the line work is quite nice, though I don’t like the monochromatic color scheme. The map of Venice in the frontispiece is pretty cool, though.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Saanvi

    The book kept me hooked till the last. It is mind-blowing! Especially the characters of Antonio and Shylock. A must read. Although short, but the story is made with a lot of thinking and is full of depth! Just woah! And Bassanio and Jessica:) Ah, how lovely are the characters. How the character of Jessica has been made with so much excellence. The disguise. It's amazing! Has to be read for sure:) The book kept me hooked till the last. It is mind-blowing! Especially the characters of Antonio and Shylock. A must read. Although short, but the story is made with a lot of thinking and is full of depth! Just woah! And Bassanio and Jessica:) Ah, how lovely are the characters. How the character of Jessica has been made with so much excellence. The disguise. It's amazing! Has to be read for sure:)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Indira

    I'm trying to read more graphic novels while here at work and this is probably a good start for some of our students in terms of an intro to Shakespeare, but without the full text of the play (this is really abbreviated), it doesn't seem to be the same story. The drawings, however, have a cool, gothic quality to them. I'm trying to read more graphic novels while here at work and this is probably a good start for some of our students in terms of an intro to Shakespeare, but without the full text of the play (this is really abbreviated), it doesn't seem to be the same story. The drawings, however, have a cool, gothic quality to them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cleo

    Interrresting....yeah. Take a look. Graphic novel treatment in current time and it is well done. Now, I'm not a well-read graphic reader so don't take my word for it. The story is greatly chopped down but there it is, it's still there and boy there's STILL a lot going on as one would expect. Interrresting....yeah. Take a look. Graphic novel treatment in current time and it is well done. Now, I'm not a well-read graphic reader so don't take my word for it. The story is greatly chopped down but there it is, it's still there and boy there's STILL a lot going on as one would expect.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vicky

    I really liked this story and the illustrations really helped me understand it better. I wish color was used in the depictions and certain scenes I still had trouble understanding and had to resort to sparknotes but overall I really enjoyed it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sandybear76

    graphic novel in more modern setting of Shaekspeare's play. graphic novel in more modern setting of Shaekspeare's play.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I've never been a fan of classics, I don't know what I was thinking when I picked this up. I've never been a fan of classics, I don't know what I was thinking when I picked this up.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Revisit the Jews speech

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chloe Webb

    One of my favourite plays, and this version made for an excellent recommendation to my GCSE students studying the play.

  23. 4 out of 5

    KaitLphere

    A good, brief adaptation, but Merchant of Venice is a controversial play that's difficult to enjoy. A good, brief adaptation, but Merchant of Venice is a controversial play that's difficult to enjoy.

  24. 4 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    Without-a-doubt Shakes would have recommended his plays read in the Sequential Art format since he wrote them to be seen in motion!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Gareth Hinds can do no wrong, as far as I am concerned. This Merchant really cuts through a confusing plot and does a great job with the language (sneaky to include more Shakespearean original as the story continues!)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maximillian Jackson

    On the streets of floating Venice, Italy, the merchant Antonio makes a deal that will seal his fate and intertwine his with those of many others around the city. As he signs his named on the dotted line for the sake of his friend, Bassanio, Antonio doesn’t think that his fortunes would be lost and he would have to pay the collateral forfeit of the contract: a pound of his flesh. Fatefully, it is only through Bassanio’s love interest, Portia, that Antonio is saved from the “villainous” Shylock th On the streets of floating Venice, Italy, the merchant Antonio makes a deal that will seal his fate and intertwine his with those of many others around the city. As he signs his named on the dotted line for the sake of his friend, Bassanio, Antonio doesn’t think that his fortunes would be lost and he would have to pay the collateral forfeit of the contract: a pound of his flesh. Fatefully, it is only through Bassanio’s love interest, Portia, that Antonio is saved from the “villainous” Shylock the Jew. However, those reading this review of the graphic novel adaptation of “The Merchant of Venice” are probably already familiar with the original version and have come for answers to two questions: Is this an accurate adaption and will it add anything to my “The Merchant of Venice” experience? My answers are “yes” and “no”—in that order. While the setting has been updated to a more contemporary setting, this adaptation remains faithful to the source material, even keeping the majority of the Shakespearean dialogue. However, the color palate used is a tad too monochromatic and, in my opinion, makes each scene and page look the same. Besides the modern backdrop, which doesn’t really play into the story at all, this adaptation fails to add anything new to the narrative but in fact seems to have taken away elements in the play—or at least that’s how it feels. Perhaps it is the medium that makes the play read faster but this isn’t a good thing as many of the themes get lost and you are left with only the surface story. After my reading, I kept having the feeling that there was something missing. While plays are meant to be a visual medium, comic art doesn’t cut it. The play is still better when performed. Yet and still, if someone just needs or wants to read the play, this graphic adaptation could be a suitable alternative. Many high school students (myself included) have trouble reading Shakespeare directly from the text, finding it difficult to understand the language and visualize the action. This graphic novel would definitely help with the visualization and, by extension, help with understanding the language. While not a replacement for the original text by any stretch of the imagination, this adaptation is an interesting diversion that could also be used as a “gateway book” for strugglers into the world the merchant of Venice and Shakespeare.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Madeline Cruz

    Although the artwork is beautiful, I didn't really care for this version of Shakespeare's play. I thought the wording of the speech bubbles were kind of choppy, and it didn't really fit with the story. It was almost like the author was having some trouble simplifying the play's lines and it was difficult to place in drawing form. Also, although the play has been simplified, the language is still pretty formal...almost a little too formal for a graphic novel in my opinion. I know it's supposed to Although the artwork is beautiful, I didn't really care for this version of Shakespeare's play. I thought the wording of the speech bubbles were kind of choppy, and it didn't really fit with the story. It was almost like the author was having some trouble simplifying the play's lines and it was difficult to place in drawing form. Also, although the play has been simplified, the language is still pretty formal...almost a little too formal for a graphic novel in my opinion. I know it's supposed to be a more serious and dark graphic novel, but this kind of unsettled me while I was reading it. Maybe this would work as a supplement to the actual play, but I honestly don't think I'd use it in my classroom. I got bored while reading it. This could have been chalked up to the fact that the drawing style of the panels is also less dynamic than that of other graphic novels. There are no crooked panels or drawn words for sounds such as coughing, footsteps, or background noise. The artwork is only in different shades of gray, white and black. Although this doesn't address the actual writing of the play, the artwork is very important because that's what hooks students in the first place. On the other hand, I would have much perferred this version over reading the actual play, or at least have it with me during so that I could better grasp the characters and events. Shakespeare can be difficult to read and understand in iambic pentameter, so this would also help struggling readers and take the edge off of “reading Shakespeare”. This would certainly help students ease into reading the play with a simple version first, even if it is less visually appealing that a graphic novel with color and with formal language. Madeline & Kristin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

    3.5 stars I read the The Merchant of Venice book/play in high school but did not remember much from it. My library had this graphic novel and I am travelling to Venice soon so I decided to check it out. I really liked this adaptation of the play. It was mostly modernized and definitely condensed to make it very enjoyable. The author even put a who’s-who type of chart in the beginning to help the reader know who is which character (this likely helped condense the book more). The end of this book ha 3.5 stars I read the The Merchant of Venice book/play in high school but did not remember much from it. My library had this graphic novel and I am travelling to Venice soon so I decided to check it out. I really liked this adaptation of the play. It was mostly modernized and definitely condensed to make it very enjoyable. The author even put a who’s-who type of chart in the beginning to help the reader know who is which character (this likely helped condense the book more). The end of this book has a whole page/section going into detail on whether or not this book is racist or anti-Semitic. I guess I did not give it much thought but I find all of that interesting none-the-less.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    A graphic remake of a Shakespeare classic. I acquired and read this book because I had read the Beowulf version from the same author/artist, as Beowulf is my favorite story. Being impressed with that, I was intrigued to see how Hinds handled Shakespeare. I found the art, as always, to be greatly pleasing to me. The tonal work put in, and the general care for detail are very pleasing to someone who has an interest in the arts. I was a little displeased with the story. While I can appreciate the a A graphic remake of a Shakespeare classic. I acquired and read this book because I had read the Beowulf version from the same author/artist, as Beowulf is my favorite story. Being impressed with that, I was intrigued to see how Hinds handled Shakespeare. I found the art, as always, to be greatly pleasing to me. The tonal work put in, and the general care for detail are very pleasing to someone who has an interest in the arts. I was a little displeased with the story. While I can appreciate the art, I thought that the old Shakespearean phrasing matched with the "modern" art, and the modernized plot was just...too hard to concieve. I left it feeling as if Hinds had taken the most difficult part of Shakespeare (the language, which is also the most fascinating feature, don't get me wrong) and paired it with the modern themes and art. To me, this was TOO MUCH of a culture clash, too unbelievable. I left this feeling the same, if not more confusion than if I had actually read the Shakespeare version. This was a traditional, complex, Shakespeare plot smeared with modern (albeit good) artwork that did not, for me, connect at all. I gave it two stars for effort and trying something new (because isn't that what art is?) but it simply was not my cup of tea, so to speak.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Shakespeare's story of mercantilism, romance and revenge is brought to graphic novel format. As an introduction to the play, this is fantastic! However, (and the author even says this in the postscript) this is the most heavily adapted play that Hinds has done yet, so it is missing quite a bit of the dialogue / characters and side plots. This really gives a rushed and somewhat disjointed feel to the story, though if the reader was unfamiliar with the play, they may not notice. Otherwise, the mod Shakespeare's story of mercantilism, romance and revenge is brought to graphic novel format. As an introduction to the play, this is fantastic! However, (and the author even says this in the postscript) this is the most heavily adapted play that Hinds has done yet, so it is missing quite a bit of the dialogue / characters and side plots. This really gives a rushed and somewhat disjointed feel to the story, though if the reader was unfamiliar with the play, they may not notice. Otherwise, the modern setting and styles honestly work pretty well (though I do wish there'd been a bit more color, it is all black and white; but that's more a personal preference). I love that Hinds slowly changes the dialogue from more modern speech back to the original words (just in time for the best speeches, which are mostly unchanged)! Content notes: No language issues. Some mildly sensually suggestive talk, but nothing shown. No violence, though there is severe harm threatened. As an added note, some of the speeches could be interpreted as racism and there is a definite Jews vs. Christians vibe going on.

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