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The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 2008: Twenty-First Annual Collection

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As in every year since 1988, the editors tirelessly scoured story collections, magazines, and anthologies worldwide to compile a delightful, diverse feast of tales and poems. On this anniversary, the editors have increased the size of the collection to 300,000 words of fiction and poetry, including works by Billy Collins, Ted Chiang, Karen Joy Fowler, Elizabeth Hand, Glen As in every year since 1988, the editors tirelessly scoured story collections, magazines, and anthologies worldwide to compile a delightful, diverse feast of tales and poems. On this anniversary, the editors have increased the size of the collection to 300,000 words of fiction and poetry, including works by Billy Collins, Ted Chiang, Karen Joy Fowler, Elizabeth Hand, Glen Hirshberg, Joyce Carol Oates, and new World Fantasy Award winner M. Rickert. With impeccably researched summations of the field by the editors, Honorable Mentions, and articles by Edward Bryant, Charles de Lint and Jeff VanderMeer on media, music and graphic novels, this is a heady brew topped off by an unparalleled list of sources of fabulous works both light and dark.


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As in every year since 1988, the editors tirelessly scoured story collections, magazines, and anthologies worldwide to compile a delightful, diverse feast of tales and poems. On this anniversary, the editors have increased the size of the collection to 300,000 words of fiction and poetry, including works by Billy Collins, Ted Chiang, Karen Joy Fowler, Elizabeth Hand, Glen As in every year since 1988, the editors tirelessly scoured story collections, magazines, and anthologies worldwide to compile a delightful, diverse feast of tales and poems. On this anniversary, the editors have increased the size of the collection to 300,000 words of fiction and poetry, including works by Billy Collins, Ted Chiang, Karen Joy Fowler, Elizabeth Hand, Glen Hirshberg, Joyce Carol Oates, and new World Fantasy Award winner M. Rickert. With impeccably researched summations of the field by the editors, Honorable Mentions, and articles by Edward Bryant, Charles de Lint and Jeff VanderMeer on media, music and graphic novels, this is a heady brew topped off by an unparalleled list of sources of fabulous works both light and dark.

30 review for The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 2008: Twenty-First Annual Collection

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    As with most anthologies, there are two losers for every enjoyable story. In this case, though, I generally disliked stories purely because they did not fit to my personal taste. (A few too many were pretentious stories about the mystical ways of writers.) Still, it was a nice change from disliking stories because they're sloppy cliched messes. I enjoyed: "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A fairy tale of economics" by Daniel Abraham. A debauched lord with unlimited wealth and power finds amusement out As with most anthologies, there are two losers for every enjoyable story. In this case, though, I generally disliked stories purely because they did not fit to my personal taste. (A few too many were pretentious stories about the mystical ways of writers.) Still, it was a nice change from disliking stories because they're sloppy cliched messes. I enjoyed: "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A fairy tale of economics" by Daniel Abraham. A debauched lord with unlimited wealth and power finds amusement out of setting unsolvable riddles to a humble money-changer. "The Last Worders" by Karen Joy Fowler. Twin sisters think precisely alike--until a small betrayal that tears them forever assunder. "Winter's Wife" by Elizabeth Hand. A young boy observes his mysterious neighbor Winter, and Winter's equally fascinating and obscure new wife from Iceland. I love the magic here. "A Reversal of Fortune" by Holly Black. Black is one of the very few authors who can write believable lower class teenager protagonists. Nikki lives in a trailer park with her erstwhile brother and devoted dog, and spends the summer missing her best friend and getting most of her calories from candy stolen from her job. When her dog is hit by her crush's truck, she challenges the devil to a candy-eating contest: she could win her dog's life, or lose her soul. Luckily, Nikki is as clever and gutsy as she is stubborn. "The Boulder" by Lucy Kemnitzer is a well-crafted modern perspective on the classic "stolen beneath the Hill" fairy tale. "The Hill" by Tanith Lee. The only one of the "horror" stories herein to actually have a scary moment. Disturbing imagery and a great concept, but the real strength here is the main character's sensible inner voice. The ending spends a little too much time explaining every bit of the mystery, but Lee does a good job of laying the clues throughout the story. "Lovers: (Jaafar the Winged)" by Khaled Mattawa is the only poem I liked in this collection, despite Billy Collins's inclusion. "Sir Hereward and Mister Fitz Go to War Again" by Garth Nix is a great adventure story. Nix is a true adept at creating interesting fantasy worlds and relatable heroes. Hereward is a mercenary knight who likes fine clothes, scarred lovers, and his former nursemaid, current companion, the ensorcelled puppet Fitz. The anthology ends with the excellent "The Evolution of Trickster Stories Among the Dogs of North Park After the Change" by Kij Johnson. The animals of Earth all learned to speak in the same moment, but their newfound ability to communicate makes their former loving owners wary, shamed, and distrustful. Really interesting meditation on slavery and trust.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jayme

    This book was a total surprise. I got it expecting to pick out a few of the better looking stories to read at most and I expected a lot of the stereotypical stories you would think are included in a fantasy and horror anthology. There wasn't a single dragon or elf in the whole book and I could not have been happier about that. The stories were incredibly original and I read ever single one. However, I wasn't a huge fan of the poetry, but I'm in no position to criticize poetry in the first place. This book was a total surprise. I got it expecting to pick out a few of the better looking stories to read at most and I expected a lot of the stereotypical stories you would think are included in a fantasy and horror anthology. There wasn't a single dragon or elf in the whole book and I could not have been happier about that. The stories were incredibly original and I read ever single one. However, I wasn't a huge fan of the poetry, but I'm in no position to criticize poetry in the first place. These are my five favourite stories from the lot, the best of the best: 1.The Cambist and Lord Iron by Daniel Abraham 2.Winter's Wife by Elizabeth Hand 3.The Gray Boy's Work by M.T. Anderson 4.The Merchant and the Alchemists Gate by Ted Chiang 5.The Evolution of Trickster Stories by Kij Johnson And I have a sixth, "Rats", because it was such a unique way to use a fairy tale. I haven't read anything like it before.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Overall I was disappointed with this anthology. I didn't find many of the stories compelling or interesting. I think this is mainly due to the difficulty in creating suspense-rich worlds in a short story format. The stories that I did really enjoy were as follows: The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics: I really liked how the writer integrated some principles of economics into the story and how they were used to explore two very interesting characters. The Merchant and the Alchemist' Overall I was disappointed with this anthology. I didn't find many of the stories compelling or interesting. I think this is mainly due to the difficulty in creating suspense-rich worlds in a short story format. The stories that I did really enjoy were as follows: The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics: I really liked how the writer integrated some principles of economics into the story and how they were used to explore two very interesting characters. The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate: Nice collection of parables that integrated time travel nicely in a criminally underused classical arab setting. A Reversal of Fortune: Because who doesn't like stories about going toe-to-toe with the devil for the life of your dog. Sir Hereward and Mister Fitz go to war again: Nice little fantasy story about a pair of mercenaries that carry our a sacred duty in the course of their travels. Nice world building in a limited space. Closest Dreams: A very chilling story about an victim of abuse. Still, these were a small minority of the total stories and poems in the anthology.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mary Overton

    "Mother's Milk" by Mary Overton, originally published in ZAHIR 13, is listed as an honorable mention .... along with a gazillion other stories. "Mother's Milk" by Mary Overton, originally published in ZAHIR 13, is listed as an honorable mention .... along with a gazillion other stories.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Soelo

    I did not read every story. I am not a big horror fan. Great: The Cambist and Lord Iron was great and makes philosophical point without being dry Vampires in the Lemon Grove The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate Good: Sir Hereward and Mister Fitz Go to War Again Splitfoot Rats - true, sad Winter's Wife Not as good: Up the Fire Road Holiday I did not read every story. I am not a big horror fan. Great: The Cambist and Lord Iron was great and makes philosophical point without being dry Vampires in the Lemon Grove The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate Good: Sir Hereward and Mister Fitz Go to War Again Splitfoot Rats - true, sad Winter's Wife Not as good: Up the Fire Road Holiday

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julie Smith

    This is a huge omnibus of 36 stories and 7 poems as chosen by Ellen Datlow for works premiering in 2008. With so much to choose from, there are some wonderful standouts and some that just made me go, "Huh?" (luckily, only 3 of them made me do that). I read this throughout February (a story or sometimes two each night before bed), and now I just want all of the collections I don't have yet. Here are some of my notes: The Forest by Laird Barron - feels like you have to be high to appreciate it The Me This is a huge omnibus of 36 stories and 7 poems as chosen by Ellen Datlow for works premiering in 2008. With so much to choose from, there are some wonderful standouts and some that just made me go, "Huh?" (luckily, only 3 of them made me do that). I read this throughout February (a story or sometimes two each night before bed), and now I just want all of the collections I don't have yet. Here are some of my notes: The Forest by Laird Barron - feels like you have to be high to appreciate it The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate by Ted Chiang - an Egyptian fable about a Gate of Years which transports you 20 years into a fixed future - I really liked this one Rats - by Veronica Schanoes - a familiar, darkly modernized fairy tale .. with rats - I liked this one too The Swing by Don Tumasonis - where a swing appears to swallow up young girls - I liked this one, but it was one of those reads where you really need to pay attention to catch all of the nuances My two favorites: The Fiddler of Bayou Teche by Delia Sherman - about a girl named Cadence with white skin, hair, and pink eyes who was found in the swamp by loup-garous (werewolves) and raised by Tante Eulalie, a woman with many gifts, including healing, in her self-imposed swamp exile. Cadence eventually finds herself in a battle with a fiddler who can "fiddle the Devil out of Hell." Winter's Wife by Elizabeth Hand - In Shaker Harbor, ME, Roderick Gale Winter, much beloved by his neighbors, including 15-year-old Justin, takes a wife from Iceland (Vaia). In Roderick's house, huldu folk reside as carvings in the beams of the house. When the King's Pines, three majestic pines near the water, are threatened by a wealthy and selfish area developer, strange happenings abound. I love collections like these, and as I said before, reading this one made me put the others on my to-buy list. If you like fantastically dark tales, this is probably a collection you'll want too. BOOK RATING: 4.5 out of 5 stars

  7. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Always a grand assorted bag. Here's what I liked: "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics" by Daniel Abraham - a fantastic story that actually makes economic matters interesting; "Vampires in the Lemon Grove" by Karen Russell - in which vampires are on the hunt for new wondrous tastes; the poem "Scenes of Hell" by Billy Collins - both Boschian and modern; "The Last Worders" by Karen Joy Fowler - where twins are not the best of friends; "The Monsters of Heaven" by Nathan Ballingrud Always a grand assorted bag. Here's what I liked: "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics" by Daniel Abraham - a fantastic story that actually makes economic matters interesting; "Vampires in the Lemon Grove" by Karen Russell - in which vampires are on the hunt for new wondrous tastes; the poem "Scenes of Hell" by Billy Collins - both Boschian and modern; "The Last Worders" by Karen Joy Fowler - where twins are not the best of friends; "The Monsters of Heaven" by Nathan Ballingrud - defenseless angels and parents in pain; "The Fiddler of Bayou Teche" by Delia Sherman - an evocative story of the Louisiana bayou; "Winter's Wife" by Elizabeth Hand - the wife can be a little stony; the poem "Troll" by Nathalie Anderson - sing-songingly rhythmic; "The Drowned Life" by Jeffrey Ford - a literal story of drowning in debt; the poem "Follow Me Home" by Sonya Taaffe - the imagery is tough to shake; "The Forest" by Laird Barron - an eldritch tale of obsession and what exists beyond humankind; "Up the Fire Road" by Eileen Gunn - a hilarous tale of something strange in the mountains; "A Reversal of Fortune" by Holly Black - dealings with the devil; the poem "Village Smart" by Maggie Smith - a condensed fairy tale; "The Hill" by Tanith Lee - a dry tale of the fantastic; "The Hide" by Liz Williams - creepy and sad; "Closet Dreams" by Lisa Tuttle - truly heartbreaking; and "The Evolution of Trickster Stories Among the Dogs of North Park After the Change" by Kij Johnson - what if dogs could talk? That's a lot of good stories!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I've been buying this series every year for 18 years, starting with the third volumne (and I picked up the first two as well). This series is great not only for the short fiction contained in each book, but for the essays that appear in the beginning. You get a nice overview of fantasy and horror books, an obit section, film and music overview as well as comics, but not Marvel and DC. It's a must read for me. This editon was better than last years. Sometimes, the editions seem to have too much fr I've been buying this series every year for 18 years, starting with the third volumne (and I picked up the first two as well). This series is great not only for the short fiction contained in each book, but for the essays that appear in the beginning. You get a nice overview of fantasy and horror books, an obit section, film and music overview as well as comics, but not Marvel and DC. It's a must read for me. This editon was better than last years. Sometimes, the editions seem to have too much from other anthologies the editors have done; this is not the case here. LIke most editions, this one has a few "really, you thought this was good" stories in it, but overall the stories are wonderful. The collection starts out strong with "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics" by Daniel Abraham. This short story should be a must read for any business major. The collection also finishes on a high note, at least for us dog lovers, with "The Evolution of Trickster Stories AMong the Dogs of North Park After the Change" by Kij Johnson. Other stand out stories include "Vampires in the Lemon Grove", "The House of Mechanical Pain", "Mr. Poo-Poo", and "Winter's Wife". "Winter's Wife is particularly good because of how it is told; not too much but not too little either. The too little being told is the problem with a few of the stories, including "The Last Worders". For me, the best story in the collection is "Rats" by Veronica Schanoes, though I would argue that it is not fantasy nor horror. It is a poignant fairy tale, a real fairy tale.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I gave the anthology, as a whole, two stars because I found most of the stores mediocre and rather forgettable. However, there are a few I really enjoyed and want to point those out. I'm not going to give a synopsis of each of one. You can look them up yourself if you're that intrigued. They are: "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics" by Daniel Abraham "The Swing" by Don Tumasonis "The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate" by Ted Chiang "Closet Dreams" by Lisa Tuttle "The Evolution of Tr I gave the anthology, as a whole, two stars because I found most of the stores mediocre and rather forgettable. However, there are a few I really enjoyed and want to point those out. I'm not going to give a synopsis of each of one. You can look them up yourself if you're that intrigued. They are: "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics" by Daniel Abraham "The Swing" by Don Tumasonis "The Merchant and the Alchemist's Gate" by Ted Chiang "Closet Dreams" by Lisa Tuttle "The Evolution of Trickster Stories Among the Dogs of North Park After the Change" by Kij Johnson "A Reversal of Fortune" by Holly Black The last one on the list barely made the cut because I have a weakness for stories about people who try to bargain with the devil. For a little balance, here are the stories that stand out to me for being exceptionally awful: "Up the Fire Road" by Eileen Gunn "Rats" by Veronica Schanoes "A Perfect and Unmappable Grace" by Jack M. Haringa "England and Nowhere" by Tim Nickels

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I've been reading the Year's Best Fantasy & Horror for most of its run, always devouring the essays at the beginning, then carefully skipping or skimming the stories introduced by Ellen Datlow, and reading those edited by (then) Terri Windling and (now) Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant. I really can't read horror, but I find myself peeking in. Surely the best horror is worth reading, right? It's a delicate balance. A single story in one of these anthologies when I was a teenager is responsible for I've been reading the Year's Best Fantasy & Horror for most of its run, always devouring the essays at the beginning, then carefully skipping or skimming the stories introduced by Ellen Datlow, and reading those edited by (then) Terri Windling and (now) Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant. I really can't read horror, but I find myself peeking in. Surely the best horror is worth reading, right? It's a delicate balance. A single story in one of these anthologies when I was a teenager is responsible for the fact that I can't watch even the most comedic zombie movies without nightmares. In any case, there are several excellent stories in this collection. The standouts for me are "The Merchant & The Alchemist's Gate" by Ted Chiang (also available as an e-book), Jeffrey Ford's haunting "The Drowned Life", Holly Black's "A Reversal of Fortune", and Veronica Schanoes' Nancy Spungen-inspired fairy tale "Rats".

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    Sorry for virtually the same review on whole anthology set I own a trade sized paper back. I started this anthology with the 5th Annual and I loved it so much I started collecting the whole set by signing up for pre-orders with the book store. What sets this anthology apart from many others is that I always find two or three gems within its pages, many liked stories and very few I have to force myself through. More importantly, from those people I have noted who read these anthologies too, they say Sorry for virtually the same review on whole anthology set I own a trade sized paper back. I started this anthology with the 5th Annual and I loved it so much I started collecting the whole set by signing up for pre-orders with the book store. What sets this anthology apart from many others is that I always find two or three gems within its pages, many liked stories and very few I have to force myself through. More importantly, from those people I have noted who read these anthologies too, they say the same thing. I rated this whole anthology based on the variety of the stories within, how many people seem to report finding the same ratio of gems & well received stories. I am happy to own this whole anthology and keep them in excellent shape, no matter how many times I have read them. So it is with heavy heart to see this one as the last in the series. To Ellen Datlow, Terri Windling, Thomas Canty, Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant: Thank you.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Genevieve Williams

    This excellent collection makes me sad that it was the last (though Datlow is editing a horror-specific anthology; being less of a fan of horror than of fantasy, however, for me it comes to the same thing in the end). There isn't a weak piece in it, though everyone will like some stories better than others, and it includes stories by authors who are (or who have since become) household names as well as relative unknowns. The review essay was interesting and provided fodder for additional reading This excellent collection makes me sad that it was the last (though Datlow is editing a horror-specific anthology; being less of a fan of horror than of fantasy, however, for me it comes to the same thing in the end). There isn't a weak piece in it, though everyone will like some stories better than others, and it includes stories by authors who are (or who have since become) household names as well as relative unknowns. The review essay was interesting and provided fodder for additional reading, but I was primarily there for the fiction and the anthology fulfilled that portion admirably. It's unfortunate that it isn't continuing as venues for short fiction are generally going under and/or becoming less visible--a bit puzzling since short stories seem tailor-made for online reading. Perhaps this, or something like it, will be reborn online.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Not being able to invest in this anthology is a bigger mystery than anything in the anthology itself. Perhaps it's the "in-circle" selection of authors, or the fact that the stories aren't clearly foreshadowed (so it feels like a crap shoot), or the fact that most of the stories are fantasy, when the intention existed mostly for horror. Regardless, much of the storytelling seems simply included because the writers were looking to write something to get published in this anthology, not because th Not being able to invest in this anthology is a bigger mystery than anything in the anthology itself. Perhaps it's the "in-circle" selection of authors, or the fact that the stories aren't clearly foreshadowed (so it feels like a crap shoot), or the fact that most of the stories are fantasy, when the intention existed mostly for horror. Regardless, much of the storytelling seems simply included because the writers were looking to write something to get published in this anthology, not because the stories flowed naturally from them. Definitely not worth the $35 list price, the book seems better suited for library time-killing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics" by Daniel Abraham - 5 stars "Vampires in the Lemon Grove" by Karen Russell - 2 stars "Holiday" by M. Rickert - 4 stars "Hum Drum" by Gary McMahon - 2 stars "Splitfoot" by Paul Walther - 2 stars "The House of Mechanical Pain" by Chaz Brenchley - 3 stars "The Last Worders" by Karen Joy Fowler - 2 stars "The Monsters of Heaven" - 2 stars "The Fiddler of Bayou Teche" by Delia Sherman - 3 stars "Mr. Poo-Poo" by Reggie Oliver - 1 star "Winter's Wife" by Eli "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics" by Daniel Abraham - 5 stars "Vampires in the Lemon Grove" by Karen Russell - 2 stars "Holiday" by M. Rickert - 4 stars "Hum Drum" by Gary McMahon - 2 stars "Splitfoot" by Paul Walther - 2 stars "The House of Mechanical Pain" by Chaz Brenchley - 3 stars "The Last Worders" by Karen Joy Fowler - 2 stars "The Monsters of Heaven" - 2 stars "The Fiddler of Bayou Teche" by Delia Sherman - 3 stars "Mr. Poo-Poo" by Reggie Oliver - 1 star "Winter's Wife" by Elizabeth Hand - 2 stars "The Tenth Muse" by William Browning Spencer - 2 stars "The Drowned Life" by Jeffrey Ford - 1.5 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Compton-Mys

    I loved the ingenuity of Daniel Abraham's tale "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics". It was very well written and kept my attention riveted through various toddler sabotage attempts, so I give this one 5 stars. "Vampires in the Lemon Grove" was told from a truly unique perspective, and I think if I were in a different place emotionally I would give it 5 stars. For now, a 3.5, even though stars must be whole. Phttt. M. Rickert's "Holiday" gave me a little too much stomach squishin I loved the ingenuity of Daniel Abraham's tale "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics". It was very well written and kept my attention riveted through various toddler sabotage attempts, so I give this one 5 stars. "Vampires in the Lemon Grove" was told from a truly unique perspective, and I think if I were in a different place emotionally I would give it 5 stars. For now, a 3.5, even though stars must be whole. Phttt. M. Rickert's "Holiday" gave me a little too much stomach squishiness of Ick, although I will say the seed of the idea is really cool. The writing is excellent. The narrator, however, did not strike me in a good way. 3 stars

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Okay, so I haven't read every single story in here, but I've read a lot of them, and this book is LONG. It is also awesome. The overall quality of the stories is great, it's just that some of the horror ones are not quite to my taste. I get scared, or grossed out. LOVE Daniel Abraham's story "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics." And this is worth buying for the 50+ pages of other reading recommendations (annotated) at the beginning alone. I'm so sad this series is being discont Okay, so I haven't read every single story in here, but I've read a lot of them, and this book is LONG. It is also awesome. The overall quality of the stories is great, it's just that some of the horror ones are not quite to my taste. I get scared, or grossed out. LOVE Daniel Abraham's story "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics." And this is worth buying for the 50+ pages of other reading recommendations (annotated) at the beginning alone. I'm so sad this series is being discontinued.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    In short, this book is simply too much of a good thing. There are 63 pages of editorial writing about the background of horror and fantasy, and obits of writers and all sorts of flotsam. The text is dense and there are ALOT of stories jammed into this book. The cover's text states "more than 250,000 words..". Folks, that's too much. I'd prefer a smaller anthology and a more exclusive set of stories. I have some small anthologies in my personal collection and nearly every story is a true gem. An In short, this book is simply too much of a good thing. There are 63 pages of editorial writing about the background of horror and fantasy, and obits of writers and all sorts of flotsam. The text is dense and there are ALOT of stories jammed into this book. The cover's text states "more than 250,000 words..". Folks, that's too much. I'd prefer a smaller anthology and a more exclusive set of stories. I have some small anthologies in my personal collection and nearly every story is a true gem. An anthology this size, clunkers are inevitable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Sutton

    Once again Datlow, Link, and Grant have created a collection of powerful fiction. The very first story, "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics", is one of the best stories I've EVER read. Once again Datlow, Link, and Grant have created a collection of powerful fiction. The very first story, "The Cambist and Lord Iron: A Fairy Tale of Economics", is one of the best stories I've EVER read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Sebesta

    Well I didn't read the intro stuff - all 100+ pages. And I didn't read the horror stories (identified as being chosen by Ellen Datlow). Which means I read about a third of the 550ish pages and found perhaps three stories I liked well enough to recall. Must not have been my year. Well I didn't read the intro stuff - all 100+ pages. And I didn't read the horror stories (identified as being chosen by Ellen Datlow). Which means I read about a third of the 550ish pages and found perhaps three stories I liked well enough to recall. Must not have been my year.

  20. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 2008: 21st Annual Collection (Year's Best Fantasy and Horror) by Kelly Link (2008) The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror 2008: 21st Annual Collection (Year's Best Fantasy and Horror) by Kelly Link (2008)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nesie

    http://www.greenmanreview.com/book/bo... http://www.greenmanreview.com/book/bo...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Felix

    voluminous collection of short-stories, thematically there's a clear tendency towards horror, only a handful of stories being included that I'd consider fantasy. voluminous collection of short-stories, thematically there's a clear tendency towards horror, only a handful of stories being included that I'd consider fantasy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Juniper

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Ashford

  25. 5 out of 5

    E.C.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul Chambers

  27. 4 out of 5

    JayDeeReading

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tema

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jason Howard

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