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Own It: The Power of Women at Work

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Picking up the women and success conversation where Sheryl Sandberg left off, Krawcheck shows women how to take their careers to the next level....by playing by a new set of rules that build on their natural strengths. So much career advice for women addresses how to succeed in the static business world of yesterday and today. But that world, says former Wall Street powe Picking up the women and success conversation where Sheryl Sandberg left off, Krawcheck shows women how to take their careers to the next level....by playing by a new set of rules that build on their natural strengths. So much career advice for women addresses how to succeed in the static business world of yesterday and today. But that world, says former Wall Street powerhouse-turned entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck, is changing - and fast. In fact, we are on the brink of what Krawcheck calls the Fourth Wave of feminism, one that will usher in unprecedented opportunities for women in business. This all is being driven by the fact that the business world is evolving in ways that play to women's strengths. Because in the increasingly complex and connected world of tomorrow - one in which communication and collaboration rule the day - the skills and qualities needed for success are ones that women inherently possess. And by owning and investing in those qualities women have more power than ever. Here Krawcheck draws on her experiences at the highest levels of business, both as one of the lone women at the top rungs of the biggest boy's club in the world, and as an entrepreneur, to show how women can tap into this growing power to elevate their careers: from getting the raise, to new takes on networking and mentoring, to navigating career breaks and curveballs to avoiding the biggest career mistake that most women don't know they are making. At the same time, women have the opportunity to play a more significant role than they know in shaping their companies into places they want to work - or leave to start their own: by initiating the -courageous conversations- about true flexibility and diversity in the workplace, forging non-traditional career paths, and more. Lighting the path to complete the revolution ignited by Gloria Steinem, Krawcheck shows how each one of us can ride the wave of this revolution to own our careers and our futures. From the Hardcover edition.


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Picking up the women and success conversation where Sheryl Sandberg left off, Krawcheck shows women how to take their careers to the next level....by playing by a new set of rules that build on their natural strengths. So much career advice for women addresses how to succeed in the static business world of yesterday and today. But that world, says former Wall Street powe Picking up the women and success conversation where Sheryl Sandberg left off, Krawcheck shows women how to take their careers to the next level....by playing by a new set of rules that build on their natural strengths. So much career advice for women addresses how to succeed in the static business world of yesterday and today. But that world, says former Wall Street powerhouse-turned entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck, is changing - and fast. In fact, we are on the brink of what Krawcheck calls the Fourth Wave of feminism, one that will usher in unprecedented opportunities for women in business. This all is being driven by the fact that the business world is evolving in ways that play to women's strengths. Because in the increasingly complex and connected world of tomorrow - one in which communication and collaboration rule the day - the skills and qualities needed for success are ones that women inherently possess. And by owning and investing in those qualities women have more power than ever. Here Krawcheck draws on her experiences at the highest levels of business, both as one of the lone women at the top rungs of the biggest boy's club in the world, and as an entrepreneur, to show how women can tap into this growing power to elevate their careers: from getting the raise, to new takes on networking and mentoring, to navigating career breaks and curveballs to avoiding the biggest career mistake that most women don't know they are making. At the same time, women have the opportunity to play a more significant role than they know in shaping their companies into places they want to work - or leave to start their own: by initiating the -courageous conversations- about true flexibility and diversity in the workplace, forging non-traditional career paths, and more. Lighting the path to complete the revolution ignited by Gloria Steinem, Krawcheck shows how each one of us can ride the wave of this revolution to own our careers and our futures. From the Hardcover edition.

30 review for Own It: The Power of Women at Work

  1. 4 out of 5

    Leandra

    Of all the self-help business books related to women, this one spoke to me the most. We (men and women) hear that women don't make the same amount as far as cents on the dollar. She brought to light what that looked like over a work lifetime when we get to retirement. $1.1 million. Wow! Money speaks and now I am listening. She didn't berate men at all. Mostly the book is about the tools we already have as women and how to actually use them. I recommend this book for all mom and fathers. Well pretty Of all the self-help business books related to women, this one spoke to me the most. We (men and women) hear that women don't make the same amount as far as cents on the dollar. She brought to light what that looked like over a work lifetime when we get to retirement. $1.1 million. Wow! Money speaks and now I am listening. She didn't berate men at all. Mostly the book is about the tools we already have as women and how to actually use them. I recommend this book for all mom and fathers. Well pretty much everyone.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rhode

    Received this as a gift and have not been able to make myself crack the cover. (So I guess it's a DNS - did not start.) The cover says, "THE POWER OF WOMEN AT WORK" (caps its.) Yet this photo is one of the least powerful portraits of a businesswoman I've ever seen. She is *incredibly* vulnerably portrayed: Nudity: Her arms, calves and knees are bare. (If she's got hose on, it's nude-sheer invisible.) Her neck and most of her shoulders are naked, and her top is cut fairly low. She is not wearing a Received this as a gift and have not been able to make myself crack the cover. (So I guess it's a DNS - did not start.) The cover says, "THE POWER OF WOMEN AT WORK" (caps its.) Yet this photo is one of the least powerful portraits of a businesswoman I've ever seen. She is *incredibly* vulnerably portrayed: Nudity: Her arms, calves and knees are bare. (If she's got hose on, it's nude-sheer invisible.) Her neck and most of her shoulders are naked, and her top is cut fairly low. She is not wearing a necklace, scarf or anything else to distract from skin. No businessman on the planet would ever show that much skin in a professional portrait. For that matter no businesswoman I know would go about that unclothed unless she'd flung off her jacket because hot flash. Science shows women's arms are generally colder than men's. In a typical office setting, our extremities are chilly. That's why we all have spare sweaters in our cubes while men fling off their jackets whenever possible. So, why are women portrayed in media with relentlessly bare arms and legs? Well, a very few may be warm (Michelle Obama I'm looking at you.) I'd posit though for the remainder those bare arms are so we look attractive to men. Men like to see skin. But, um, if you are OWNING IT and being POWERFUL, does that mean you have to strip clothing off, show some skin, so the boys like you? That's an incredibly depressing message for Ms. Krawcheck's outfit to be sending. In general in art, the person who is nuder is the person who is more vulnerable, objectified, there for the pleasure of others, owning less personal power. Stratospheric shoes: Her pointy toed shoes are at least 4" spiky heels. Maybe higher. These are not shoes most people can comfortably stride down the corridors of power in. Visually, these are the western equivalent of geisha shoes. They are beautiful. They are lovely. They are not powerful except in specific sexual or flirtatious situations. Aside from looking uncomfortable and unsafe, they also look height insecure. The message reads, women are not powerful in their natural stance. They are not powerful at the height they are born with. They must use aids to reach up to a man's height. Short can't be powerful. Ladylike posture: You know what says confidence and power? Spread legs. Both feet on the ground in a stance that's hard to push over. Arms akimbo. Instead what we see here is a clenched ladylike posture. Sure, one arm is on a hip, but the other lays protectively across her lap, and her legs are carefully crossed. Only the tip of one shoe even touches the footing. This is not confident posture, this is careful ladylike posture. Her shoes say Dominatrix, her posture politely asks us if we would like some sugar with our tea. Precarious position: She is so precariously balanced on that little white ladder that I get the feeling I could blow hard and she would fall off. Despite the smile, she looks incredibly uncomfortable. There is nothing she can do from that position aside from get down very carefully, probably while holding onto someone's hand for balance. She can't leap up, jump, stride, wave her arms about, give a rousing speech, go forth, dance, run, or even walk. She can't take a step. She can't climb up any further either. There's nowhere to go. She is stuck and needs help to do anything beyond smile and carefully pose. This is the image of a powerful woman? How? In what manner? This is something alright. It's powerfully sad. Can you imagine if we asked a powerful businessmen to pose like a pin up girl, half naked, while balanced on a skimpy ladder? Yeah no. Ms. Krawcheck should have said no to this photo. The fact that she approved it makes me wonder how little power she has.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Hardly ever write reviews so here goes: If you are a woman, work with women, live with women, have women in your family...read this book. Sallie Krawcheck succinctly shares how women can leverage their strengths in their workplace and she does it in a very matter-of-fact manner. No high falutin' ethereal stuff here, folks. Just the real deal. Realizing that The Sallie Krawcheck went through many of the same experiences that I have throughout my career was a surprise and a comfort. More importantly, Hardly ever write reviews so here goes: If you are a woman, work with women, live with women, have women in your family...read this book. Sallie Krawcheck succinctly shares how women can leverage their strengths in their workplace and she does it in a very matter-of-fact manner. No high falutin' ethereal stuff here, folks. Just the real deal. Realizing that The Sallie Krawcheck went through many of the same experiences that I have throughout my career was a surprise and a comfort. More importantly, her book gives women and the people around them the tools to improve the workplace for the betterment of business and at the end of the day, the world. I only wish it would have been possible for me to read this at the beginning of my career.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Wow! There is really no reason why it took me so long to read this book. I got it as a part of a “frequent readers group”, but I can’t even remember the name of the organization now. I really like to read and review without bias, so maybe that’s why I wasn’t super excited about reading it . . . BUT, it was great! It was right up my alley and ended at the MOST appropriate time in my life of starting a new business. It will definitely be a reference book and one I will refer to other young women o Wow! There is really no reason why it took me so long to read this book. I got it as a part of a “frequent readers group”, but I can’t even remember the name of the organization now. I really like to read and review without bias, so maybe that’s why I wasn’t super excited about reading it . . . BUT, it was great! It was right up my alley and ended at the MOST appropriate time in my life of starting a new business. It will definitely be a reference book and one I will refer to other young women on their career journeys.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Busy

    Love her positive attitude that it is the best time ever to be a woman and that things will only get better- I hope that is true! And love her recommendations: Increase women and diversity in the work place and your business will be more successful! Respect work life balance and mean it! Provide leave and flexibility without shame! Let people be themselves and voice opinions! Treat your employees like people! And ladies, speak up for yourself and don't be afraid to invest. Sallie gets it. Love her positive attitude that it is the best time ever to be a woman and that things will only get better- I hope that is true! And love her recommendations: Increase women and diversity in the work place and your business will be more successful! Respect work life balance and mean it! Provide leave and flexibility without shame! Let people be themselves and voice opinions! Treat your employees like people! And ladies, speak up for yourself and don't be afraid to invest. Sallie gets it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I've met Sallie. She is incredible. But meh on the book? Women are statistically better at these things - so 'own it' and be good at what you're good at. Risk, relationships, complex decision making. I did enjoy the idea that men think women are indecisive when really they are able to hold more complex cues in their head at once and make a more robust decision - which requires time. Was it better than lean in? I'm not sure. I loved lean in when I read it but now? who knows. I kinda expected Sallie I've met Sallie. She is incredible. But meh on the book? Women are statistically better at these things - so 'own it' and be good at what you're good at. Risk, relationships, complex decision making. I did enjoy the idea that men think women are indecisive when really they are able to hold more complex cues in their head at once and make a more robust decision - which requires time. Was it better than lean in? I'm not sure. I loved lean in when I read it but now? who knows. I kinda expected Sallie to write a more 'yeah - she's fucking right. no way around it' kind of book. "Wall Street was the only industry in the world in which one could make millions of dollars by being mediocre and essentially hiding in the pack." "And at some point I decided that I really didn't think fighting those battles...was what I wanted to do. So I quit. I simply quit. And I went on to choose battles that I thought were more winnable."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Better than average "how to succeed in business" book, told from the perspective of someone who witnessed the financial meltdown first hand. The advice is nothing new, and it was a little too obviously an advertisement for her new businesses for my taste, but the personal stories from inside the executive suites at the biggest players in the financial services industry make it worthwhile. Better than average "how to succeed in business" book, told from the perspective of someone who witnessed the financial meltdown first hand. The advice is nothing new, and it was a little too obviously an advertisement for her new businesses for my taste, but the personal stories from inside the executive suites at the biggest players in the financial services industry make it worthwhile.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    I liked her take on financial proficiency being the next evolution of feminism. Example: The gender pay gap is one thing, but the investment gap is even worse — ultimately leading to millions of dollars less in retirement for women than men. Naturally, her company Ellevest offers a solution, but the takeaway is that the more women understand their finances, and ask questions, the more economic power women will have. And since we all know money talks, economic power in the hands of women could le I liked her take on financial proficiency being the next evolution of feminism. Example: The gender pay gap is one thing, but the investment gap is even worse — ultimately leading to millions of dollars less in retirement for women than men. Naturally, her company Ellevest offers a solution, but the takeaway is that the more women understand their finances, and ask questions, the more economic power women will have. And since we all know money talks, economic power in the hands of women could lead to changes in families, in the wealth management system, in Wall Street, in companies and in the government.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vikki Herrett

    Altho the most of this book doesn't relate me my personnel life. It was still an enjoyable read with lessons to learn. Good steady page turner Altho the most of this book doesn't relate me my personnel life. It was still an enjoyable read with lessons to learn. Good steady page turner

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bianca Borandă

    I loved this book, it's a really quick read, but laden with candid stories that Sallie experienced during her career. She also adds 1-2 jokes per chapter which makes it more enjoyable and easier in grasping the main message of the book. Overall, I'd recommend this to any woman who's in a corporate career. It should take max 2 weeks to read, too. I loved this book, it's a really quick read, but laden with candid stories that Sallie experienced during her career. She also adds 1-2 jokes per chapter which makes it more enjoyable and easier in grasping the main message of the book. Overall, I'd recommend this to any woman who's in a corporate career. It should take max 2 weeks to read, too.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    So far, I have only been able to read the prologue and first chapter - since it will not be released until January of 2017. Here are my opinions thus far: I simply love the personal voice. It is creative to have some text in a separate color and aspects of her personal opinions in parentheses. It makes the book more enjoyable to read - at least for me who doesn't usually pick up a nonfiction or self help book. I love how she begins by introducing the importance of diversity in the work force and So far, I have only been able to read the prologue and first chapter - since it will not be released until January of 2017. Here are my opinions thus far: I simply love the personal voice. It is creative to have some text in a separate color and aspects of her personal opinions in parentheses. It makes the book more enjoyable to read - at least for me who doesn't usually pick up a nonfiction or self help book. I love how she begins by introducing the importance of diversity in the work force and how women should embrace their different abilities and be a part of that needed diversity. We don't always realize that there is a "groupthink" or see how that does hold us back in progression. But it made me think of my last job because my boss preferred to hire women over men because of the qualities we brought to the position (I worked as a theatrical production assistant, where many of our responsibilities were grunt work stage set up - which I thought a man would be better qualified). My boss taught me that women's focus, multitasking, dedication, etc sometimes brought more to the table than a man's strength and muscle. I could distinctly see how some women in the same position as men accomplished the tasks better - or at least in different ways. I liked seeing this same observation being discussed by the author in this book. For such a knowledgeable woman, I almost stopped reading when she mentioned the wage gap. Of all people, I thought she would understand the statistics behind that number. I felt it was another attempt to push the false feminist agenda. But I continued reading and later realized that it seems she does understand the stats and desires to fix it as it relates to encouraging women to enter the work field and get everything they want out of it - not letting the "groupthink" old mentality from holding them back. It made me more interested in reading more, to see if she does have a new feminist thinking that I feared, or is truly a well knowledgable woman of the 21st century as I am beginning to pick up on in this book. I I'm content with being a stay at home mom and if I did enter the work force, I will not be seeking high positions in my artistic areas of expertise, so I'm not sure how much this book may apply to me. I am fascinated to hear her stories and experiences. I would love to read more about her amazing opinions on the diversity women are bringing to the work force. However, I don't know if I will ever finish this book because I'm not sure if I would pay to buy the book just to finish reading it. I will recommend it to others, though. I can see the great potential this book will have on women; it seems to be an important message to share (as long as it avoids the new feminist nonsense that I see many online users spew). I look forward to following the success of this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Freund

    So often a book cover is a mismatch for the content, and I hoped that might be the case here. Super sexy high heels, slinky red dress, naked arms, provocative pose up on a ladder did not bode well for substance. But of course it gets a potential reader's attention, and no doubt book sales. Having now made my way through the book, I'd say the cover fits. The book is very much a sales pitch for the Ellevate network and the Ellevest digital investment advisorship platform, empowering women in financ So often a book cover is a mismatch for the content, and I hoped that might be the case here. Super sexy high heels, slinky red dress, naked arms, provocative pose up on a ladder did not bode well for substance. But of course it gets a potential reader's attention, and no doubt book sales. Having now made my way through the book, I'd say the cover fits. The book is very much a sales pitch for the Ellevate network and the Ellevest digital investment advisorship platform, empowering women in finance. I felt a little old for the target readership -- at roughly the same age as Sallie Krawcheck, in fact. But for every seemingly lighthearted bit of commiseration or cheerleading, there was also real camaraderie throughout, and a lot of details. I actually learned loads about Wall Street's inner workings. Reading the book piqued my interest such that I've now watched a number of Sallie Krawcheck's interviews on Youtube and learned even more. Her plea to women to initiate a "courageous conversation" in the workplace felt a little flimsy at times, but the point she makes about the extremely rapid pace of technology opening new roles to women in business was solid. It used to be that if a woman felt dismissed or marginalized in one company, she could look to a competitor perhaps to jump ship, or she could leave the workforce altogether. Now, women are launching companies in whole new ways, and they're seeing enormous success in doing so. Krawcheck also makes the point that innate female behaviors and strengths (prioritizing long-term relationship over immediate performance-based results, for instance) benefit progressive companies now more than ever. She makes the valid point that a diverse senior management team, one that includes women, non-binary people, and people of color, is always going to be more innovative than the echo-chamber management which gave rise to the financial crisis of 2008. Thanks to 'Own It,' I now have great lists of female executives and mission-based female-run companies to research further, and I'm really inspired to do so. The book delivers exactly what it promises. I wanted something just a little bit different from that, but I can't fault Krawcheck or her publisher one bit. If you look at its marketing materials and think yeah, this book might be worth a read, rest assured, it is.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathakali Majumdar

    I really liked this book a lot. Krawcheck's matter-of-fact approach to work and life coupled with her inherent optimism, drive, passion and emotional resilience makes her a Role Model to emulate and a woman you can easily relate to. Having operated at the top echelons of Wall Street and witnessed first hand the workings of the Big Boys' club, this is a woman who is not afraid to take the bull by its horns. The stress on taking control of our financial muscle and the need to do so backed by relev I really liked this book a lot. Krawcheck's matter-of-fact approach to work and life coupled with her inherent optimism, drive, passion and emotional resilience makes her a Role Model to emulate and a woman you can easily relate to. Having operated at the top echelons of Wall Street and witnessed first hand the workings of the Big Boys' club, this is a woman who is not afraid to take the bull by its horns. The stress on taking control of our financial muscle and the need to do so backed by relevant research and statistics is also one of the key highlights of this 21st century manual for the aspiring woman professional. Must read, for sure!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Nowatzke

    Highlights: be in control of your finances, your perceived weaknesses may actually be your strengths, & relationships matter. What I appreciated most about this book is that it felt genuine and it wasn't one where the author acted like it was an accident she got to where she was nor a tale of being in all the right places at all the right times. She has climbed and fallen off the career ladder more than once so it's much easier to relate to & be inspired by this book that many women-written stor Highlights: be in control of your finances, your perceived weaknesses may actually be your strengths, & relationships matter. What I appreciated most about this book is that it felt genuine and it wasn't one where the author acted like it was an accident she got to where she was nor a tale of being in all the right places at all the right times. She has climbed and fallen off the career ladder more than once so it's much easier to relate to & be inspired by this book that many women-written stories of success.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather Berkowitz

    I enjoyed the personal stories - here's how I did it, here's what I should have done, here's what you can do. This was easy to read and approachable without being too preachy. That said, I think I thought this was going to be something different than it was, so I was a little surprised when I started reading it. I enjoyed the personal stories - here's how I did it, here's what I should have done, here's what you can do. This was easy to read and approachable without being too preachy. That said, I think I thought this was going to be something different than it was, so I was a little surprised when I started reading it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Full disclosure: I have a complete career woman crush on Sallie Krawcheck so my review is unashamedly bias. Loved her advice; love everything she is doing for women and the investment gap; love her ethos on life; love how she talks about failure and her failures.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

    Couldn't finish it. Too much fluff, not enough substance. Too much ego, not enough teaching. Couldn't finish it. Too much fluff, not enough substance. Too much ego, not enough teaching.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Krawcheck is CEO & Co-founder of Ellevest, digital investment platform for women and Owner of Ellevate Network which was 85 Broads. Some people think having similar thinkers is good and they increase their trust in these persons. This actually causes less checking and more blind agreement which leads to more errors. We should celebrate the naysayers to better vet ideas! Spend time looking for “what if’s” and conduct post mortems to improve future endeavors. We must remain risk aware, ie. working Krawcheck is CEO & Co-founder of Ellevest, digital investment platform for women and Owner of Ellevate Network which was 85 Broads. Some people think having similar thinkers is good and they increase their trust in these persons. This actually causes less checking and more blind agreement which leads to more errors. We should celebrate the naysayers to better vet ideas! Spend time looking for “what if’s” and conduct post mortems to improve future endeavors. We must remain risk aware, ie. working hard to receive bad news WELL so people will tell you! This was KEY to employees trusting ME as their leader. I am thrilled someone else is publishing and tauting this concept. Gender bias can be reduced only with identification of clear measures of success and quantifiable results. Its tougher to argue who is doing a better job when you have data. Interesting research shows that women are compassionate when others go through difficult times, but they are less compassionate if they have also gone through the same difficulty. At this juncture women are more apt to say “buck up” instead of “let me help you!” Keep reinventing yourself, taking new assignments to expand your strengths and by all means maintain and grow a strong network with sponsors! Without these things, career breaks can be major setbacks! Financial independence is power. Investments may be more important than your career. Women can have it all. My personal caution is that every women’s definition is different for what it means to “have it all”!! Each woman must decide what she truly wants from a career, from herself, from her relationships, etc....what does "having it all" look like to you? Advice to live by: Find reasons to get the big belly laughs. ENJOY the journey even when you are NOT enjoying it! Excellent book for Professional Women’s Reading Group.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I’ve seen Ellevest advertisements around the city and my initial thought was, “This is so dumb. Why would women need a separate investment platform branded with pastel colors for our delicate eyes.” Then I went to an event featuring Sallie Krawcheck. While I thought her company was patronizing, I was open to hearing what she had to say. After all, she is a very successful woman with tons of experience in the financial industry. Her talk was basically a summary of this book. She went over a few p I’ve seen Ellevest advertisements around the city and my initial thought was, “This is so dumb. Why would women need a separate investment platform branded with pastel colors for our delicate eyes.” Then I went to an event featuring Sallie Krawcheck. While I thought her company was patronizing, I was open to hearing what she had to say. After all, she is a very successful woman with tons of experience in the financial industry. Her talk was basically a summary of this book. She went over a few personal stories and described the “investment gap” and why it exists. Feeling inspired, I bought the book before I left. Then ignored it for over a year. I wish I read it sooner. In the first few chapters, she’s kind of preaching to the choir but she backs up all her claims with anecdotal evidence and cited sources which can come in handy when debating with someone who doesn’t believe in diversity initiatives. (I would take all stats from her networking group Ellevate with a grain of salt as I don’t think it’s truly representative of professional women in the U.S.) She plugs her own companies, Ellevest and Ellevate but I don’t mind it. She genuinely seems to want women to network and invest more regardless of whether they decide to use her platforms. Most of the information in the book, I already knew from her talk and personal finance blogs but she really drives the point home. I’m not drinking the Ellevest kool-aid just yet, I would need to do more research first, however I will definitely be investing. Own It was the perfect book to start my new year. It left me feeling optimistic and inspired to take charge of my professional life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Sims

    I wasn't really expecting to like this book, but it surprised me. I'm generally not a non-fiction fan, but I'm trying to read more books in that genre. I like that Sallie makes a lot of really great points and has some amazing advice but never sounds preachy like most other books like this one. She has a great personality throughout the book. I love that she doesn’t just say that women are a major part of the workforce. She backs up all of her points with research and shows why more women need t I wasn't really expecting to like this book, but it surprised me. I'm generally not a non-fiction fan, but I'm trying to read more books in that genre. I like that Sallie makes a lot of really great points and has some amazing advice but never sounds preachy like most other books like this one. She has a great personality throughout the book. I love that she doesn’t just say that women are a major part of the workforce. She backs up all of her points with research and shows why more women need to OWN their power and how they can make themselves invaluable in their careers. She stresses that women can get top positions in any career without trying to be something they aren’t. I like that this book is feminist without being anti-male. Having said all of that, there are a few things I disliked. I think the book was way more business and facts than personal, and I really wish it were at least an even balance of the ton. I had a really hard time reading this book because it was a bit boring. I also think she plugged her business a little too much. A few times would have been fine, even beneficial to the reader but she did it a few too many times. Overall I’m glad I read it, but it’s not one that I think I’ll read again. I think women who are in corporate careers, specifically the financial industry, will enjoy this book immensely.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vonetta

    I have had this book on my shelf, signed by Sallie Krawcheck (she called me *the best*!!!!), for two years and I only just got to it yesterday. Sigh. Sometimes, you have to wait for the right moment in life; now was mine. I’m an ardent disciple of the gospel of Lean In, but this is a great supplement. I love that Krawcheck talks about her failures, the times she’s quit or been fired—that made me feel so much better about having to quit my job 2.5 years ago because it was an abusive situation. I’ I have had this book on my shelf, signed by Sallie Krawcheck (she called me *the best*!!!!), for two years and I only just got to it yesterday. Sigh. Sometimes, you have to wait for the right moment in life; now was mine. I’m an ardent disciple of the gospel of Lean In, but this is a great supplement. I love that Krawcheck talks about her failures, the times she’s quit or been fired—that made me feel so much better about having to quit my job 2.5 years ago because it was an abusive situation. I’ve only just recently felt good enough to get back into the workforce, and this book helped me break down what it is that I want from my career. I wasn’t ready to do this exercise before today. I’m glad I saved it for the start of a new year; I feel like I’ve pushed off onto a new avenue of life.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lou Edwards

    A lot of this book seems a bit of a marketing pitch. Having said that, I found most of the advice regarding a woman in leadership very interesting and definitely think it will be useful going forward. I also really enjoyed the new take on approaching business from the woman's perspective and having that be a strength rather than the weakness. That's what amped this one up to 3.5 for me. I will say this though, the description and real life situating of the 'queen bee', as defined in 'Own It', wa A lot of this book seems a bit of a marketing pitch. Having said that, I found most of the advice regarding a woman in leadership very interesting and definitely think it will be useful going forward. I also really enjoyed the new take on approaching business from the woman's perspective and having that be a strength rather than the weakness. That's what amped this one up to 3.5 for me. I will say this though, the description and real life situating of the 'queen bee', as defined in 'Own It', was pretty confronting. I know these women. I'm dealing with one at work right now, and to have it laid out so neatly really struck a chord. The culture of the queen bee is utterly toxic and needs to go. Let's all live to be better leaders, mentors and learners.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Flynn

    I got a lot out of this book. I highlighted a lot of things in the book and plan to revisit my highlights to make sure I maximize the takeaways. As a woman who works in the same industry Sally did and has held some similar positions, her experiences resonated. My only criticisms are that the book is a bit wordy (noticed several times 2 consecutive sentences made the same point, but just worded it differently); that the author sometimes strikes a self serving tone when, for example, talking about I got a lot out of this book. I highlighted a lot of things in the book and plan to revisit my highlights to make sure I maximize the takeaways. As a woman who works in the same industry Sally did and has held some similar positions, her experiences resonated. My only criticisms are that the book is a bit wordy (noticed several times 2 consecutive sentences made the same point, but just worded it differently); that the author sometimes strikes a self serving tone when, for example, talking about how many businesses she "ran"'; and that, at times, the book reads like a commercial for the author's new startup.

  24. 4 out of 5

    SerialReader

    Own It: The Power of Women at Work shows us all that getting to the top is no easy job, it takes determination, resilience and hard work, but getting at senior levels of Wall Street, holding up top jobs at some of the biggest financial firms IS POSSIBLE! You don't have to "change" or to "act like a man" to make it, but you have to be smart. Change is real and it's coming fast. It's time to own it! Powerful, straightforward; Own It: The Power of Women at Work by Sallie Krawcheck is one of those bo Own It: The Power of Women at Work shows us all that getting to the top is no easy job, it takes determination, resilience and hard work, but getting at senior levels of Wall Street, holding up top jobs at some of the biggest financial firms IS POSSIBLE! You don't have to "change" or to "act like a man" to make it, but you have to be smart. Change is real and it's coming fast. It's time to own it! Powerful, straightforward; Own It: The Power of Women at Work by Sallie Krawcheck is one of those books you have to read over and over. Read more on The Serial Reader Blog

  25. 5 out of 5

    Meepspeeps

    This is part memoir, part advice, part infomercial for her latest venture. I liked her plain and sometimes flippant writing style. Her description of women's risk awareness, backed up with research, is excellent, and demonstrates why diverse voices need to be present during business decision making. In the networking chapter, she reminds women not to conflate networking with making friends - make "loose connections." I recommend this book to peeps in all levels of management to help each reader This is part memoir, part advice, part infomercial for her latest venture. I liked her plain and sometimes flippant writing style. Her description of women's risk awareness, backed up with research, is excellent, and demonstrates why diverse voices need to be present during business decision making. In the networking chapter, she reminds women not to conflate networking with making friends - make "loose connections." I recommend this book to peeps in all levels of management to help each reader insist (if they don't already) that women be part of active, decision-making leadership.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emily Cornell

    Sallie's book is, in a word, powerful. I started it on the plane ride home from an Ellevate chapter leaders roundtable and finished it between EWR and MSP. She writes in a conversational and approachable tone but doesn't shy away from digging deep on a challenging topic. The book is well-researched and amply footnoted (no surprise from an author who spent part of her career in research). It's a great intro for those of us who are looking to #takebackfeminism and a great refresher for those of us Sallie's book is, in a word, powerful. I started it on the plane ride home from an Ellevate chapter leaders roundtable and finished it between EWR and MSP. She writes in a conversational and approachable tone but doesn't shy away from digging deep on a challenging topic. The book is well-researched and amply footnoted (no surprise from an author who spent part of her career in research). It's a great intro for those of us who are looking to #takebackfeminism and a great refresher for those of us who need inspiration to keep working to bring about a world where women are on truly equal ground.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deedi Brown (DeediReads)

    Rating: 4/5 I picked up this book because I'd heard about Ellevest, Sallie Krawcheck's entrepreneurial venture. It's an investment platform by and for women, with a unique, proprietary algorithm that tailors to women's unique salary curve and expected lifespan. I wanted to learn more about the company, and I wanted to learn more about her. I was not disappointed! I've read many "women in business" types of books, and for the first few chapters, this one felt a little bit cheesy. It was a little to Rating: 4/5 I picked up this book because I'd heard about Ellevest, Sallie Krawcheck's entrepreneurial venture. It's an investment platform by and for women, with a unique, proprietary algorithm that tailors to women's unique salary curve and expected lifespan. I wanted to learn more about the company, and I wanted to learn more about her. I was not disappointed! I've read many "women in business" types of books, and for the first few chapters, this one felt a little bit cheesy. It was a little too peppy, with a little too much of what's already been said. But I'm glad I gave it a chance. Once she gets into the meat of her ideas, she makes some very interesting and (I thought) novel points. No one else is talking about the "investment gap." No one else talks about the spending power of women as a mechanism for social change. As I read this book, I was inspired to take a closer look at my budget. To list out my goals—on paper—with anticipated timelines. To open my computer and research networking groups, both large and small. To become more active on LinkedIn. To have a conversation with my boss about metrics and goals. And if that's not the point of reading a book like this, then what is?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Annabella

    Sallie Krawcheck makes ' Owning It ' very simple and doable as she breaks down the rules that every woman should follow at work , into very well organized stories :) She talks about her stories of battle, defeat,acceptance and triumph during her three decades of career.She would make you want to get up from your seat and start challenging that , whatever caused the procrastination in your line of work .A definite leader , her charismatic approach to ' issues of work' would make your feel very 'i Sallie Krawcheck makes ' Owning It ' very simple and doable as she breaks down the rules that every woman should follow at work , into very well organized stories :) She talks about her stories of battle, defeat,acceptance and triumph during her three decades of career.She would make you want to get up from your seat and start challenging that , whatever caused the procrastination in your line of work .A definite leader , her charismatic approach to ' issues of work' would make your feel very 'in tune' with 'the team' of her and yourself .

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    The book contained a lot of advice you might already have learned if you are a seasoned professional, but the statistics she cited backing up what you may have suspected kept it fresh. Her honesty and her personal anecdotes kept it real. I would recommend it for any young person starting out, as well as to anyone with entrepreneurial dreams. It would help if white males read this book as unconscious bias is typically something you don't realize you have until either someone points it out to you The book contained a lot of advice you might already have learned if you are a seasoned professional, but the statistics she cited backing up what you may have suspected kept it fresh. Her honesty and her personal anecdotes kept it real. I would recommend it for any young person starting out, as well as to anyone with entrepreneurial dreams. It would help if white males read this book as unconscious bias is typically something you don't realize you have until either someone points it out to you or you read an example of it in a book like this and finally have your AHA moment.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Karolina

    I had the impression that I'm reading about the same thing over and over. Quite boring and repetitive. There was only one chapter I liked called "the best career advice no one is talking about". It's only 226 pages but it feels like forever. Since pretty much the entire book is about the same thing, it could have like half of the number of pages and you wouldn't be missing out much. I regret not counting how many times the author evoked her company name - Ellevest. It appeared like this book has b I had the impression that I'm reading about the same thing over and over. Quite boring and repetitive. There was only one chapter I liked called "the best career advice no one is talking about". It's only 226 pages but it feels like forever. Since pretty much the entire book is about the same thing, it could have like half of the number of pages and you wouldn't be missing out much. I regret not counting how many times the author evoked her company name - Ellevest. It appeared like this book has been written solely to promote it.

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