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Linda Brown, You Are Not Alone: The Brown V. Board of Education Decision

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When the Supreme Court decision to desegregate public schools was handed down in 1954, the course of American history was forever changed. Here are personal reflections, stories, and poems from ten of today's most accomplished writers for children, all young people themselves at the time of the Brown v. Board of Education decision. Included are Michael Cart, Jean Craighead When the Supreme Court decision to desegregate public schools was handed down in 1954, the course of American history was forever changed. Here are personal reflections, stories, and poems from ten of today's most accomplished writers for children, all young people themselves at the time of the Brown v. Board of Education decision. Included are Michael Cart, Jean Craighead George, Eloise Greenfield, Lois Lowry, Katherine Paterson, Ishmael Reed, Jerry Spinelli, Quincy Troupe, Joyce Carol Thomas, and Leona Nicholas Welch. With a compelling introduction by editor Joyce Carol Thomas and stunning pastel artwork by Curtis E. James, this collection celebrates the hard-earned promise of equality in education.


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When the Supreme Court decision to desegregate public schools was handed down in 1954, the course of American history was forever changed. Here are personal reflections, stories, and poems from ten of today's most accomplished writers for children, all young people themselves at the time of the Brown v. Board of Education decision. Included are Michael Cart, Jean Craighead When the Supreme Court decision to desegregate public schools was handed down in 1954, the course of American history was forever changed. Here are personal reflections, stories, and poems from ten of today's most accomplished writers for children, all young people themselves at the time of the Brown v. Board of Education decision. Included are Michael Cart, Jean Craighead George, Eloise Greenfield, Lois Lowry, Katherine Paterson, Ishmael Reed, Jerry Spinelli, Quincy Troupe, Joyce Carol Thomas, and Leona Nicholas Welch. With a compelling introduction by editor Joyce Carol Thomas and stunning pastel artwork by Curtis E. James, this collection celebrates the hard-earned promise of equality in education.

30 review for Linda Brown, You Are Not Alone: The Brown V. Board of Education Decision

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    This collection peels back the unrealistic gloss that history applies to events like Brown vs. the Board of Education. We have a narrative now, quite popular, that now everything is ok. We are integrated, and people of color are no longer discriminated against. But this anthology addresses the backlash to Brown V. Board of Education. States considered dismantling public education to avoid integration. Public schools closed so as to not integrate. Brown V. Board contributed to the ghettoizing bla This collection peels back the unrealistic gloss that history applies to events like Brown vs. the Board of Education. We have a narrative now, quite popular, that now everything is ok. We are integrated, and people of color are no longer discriminated against. But this anthology addresses the backlash to Brown V. Board of Education. States considered dismantling public education to avoid integration. Public schools closed so as to not integrate. Brown V. Board contributed to the ghettoizing black neighborhoods. What were once middle class black neighborhoods became destroyed. Children had to endure hostile environments from peers and teachers. All of these consequences come to the surface with the personal memoirs of various writers and artists who remember events as they unfolded in 1954.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Anjali

    I thought this book was an excellent read - though it looks like a children’s book, many of these stories are written from an adult perspective that seem more appropriate for an adult reader. There are a few stories that feel right for middle grade readers and I’m bookmarking those to read and discuss with my middle grade reader.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Theo

    Inn this book i learned and thought more about what it felt like to be in the child's shoes during this big commotion and how that could feel. I also thought more about how an innocent family was not allowed to fit in with everybody else. This book is very good and you should read it. Inn this book i learned and thought more about what it felt like to be in the child's shoes during this big commotion and how that could feel. I also thought more about how an innocent family was not allowed to fit in with everybody else. This book is very good and you should read it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah George

    1. The genre of this book is Historical Non-fiction. 2. This true story is about the life of Linda Brown, the young girl who was involved in the Brown v. Board of Education Decision case. This book has a collection of works that describe this time period and stories of the affect that this decision had on people. 3. a. The organization and style of this book is very interesting. We are able to see personal stories, poems, and pieces of work describing segregation and the experiences people faced 1. The genre of this book is Historical Non-fiction. 2. This true story is about the life of Linda Brown, the young girl who was involved in the Brown v. Board of Education Decision case. This book has a collection of works that describe this time period and stories of the affect that this decision had on people. 3. a. The organization and style of this book is very interesting. We are able to see personal stories, poems, and pieces of work describing segregation and the experiences people faced during this trying time in history. b. Because the author chose the create a collection of works in one book we are able to see all different angles of this story. Thomas created an excellent piece of work that teaches us more about this important case in history and allows us to truly get an idea of how this time period was. c. On page 15, Thomas included a poem called Desegregation, written by Eloise Greenfield, it reads: " We walk the long path; lined with shouting; nightmare faces,; nightmare voices.; Inside the school,; there are eyes that glare; and eyes that are distant.; We wish for our friends.; We wish for our old,; laughing selves.; We hold our heads up,; hold our tears in.; The grown-ups have said; we must be brave,; that only the children; can save the country; now." This poem is an excellent example of how the young students felt walking up to the school for the first time, the horrifying feeling that they must've felt. The reader is able the get a feeling of how the students felt themselves because of this collection of works. 4. SOL USII.4c: describing racial segregation, the rise of “Jim Crow,” and other constraints faced by African Americans and other groups in the post-Reconstruction South. Through the collection of works and the illustrations by Curtis Adams, students can be transported to the late 1800's to a time where segregation was very prominent.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie Suzanne

    The book begins with nonfiction background information about Brown Vs. BOE in Topeka, Kansas, but it's not written in such a way that would render it useful in the middle school classroom. The introduction was, in my opinion, a terrible read. However, I did not give up. The rest of the book is a collection of personal narratives, poems, and essays about school segregation & desegregation. So far, I've only read Jerry Spinelli's narrative (fiction or non, I'm not sure!) about a black friend he ha The book begins with nonfiction background information about Brown Vs. BOE in Topeka, Kansas, but it's not written in such a way that would render it useful in the middle school classroom. The introduction was, in my opinion, a terrible read. However, I did not give up. The rest of the book is a collection of personal narratives, poems, and essays about school segregation & desegregation. So far, I've only read Jerry Spinelli's narrative (fiction or non, I'm not sure!) about a black friend he had who moved into his all-white neighborhood. I enjoyed it, and think that my students will, too. I'm actually looking forward to reading the rest, even though it's off to such a poor start. 1 month later: Since it's taken so long to get through, it's clear that this was not a captivating read! I AM glad that I read it, though. There were some excellent essays in this collection, all seeming to be a result of famous authors being asked to write a reflection on what Brown vs. BOE means to them. Lois Lowry's reflection on her 4 years as a host to a Fresh Air child was my favorite, because I could totally relate, having had a similar experience. I also was able to see desegregation from new perspectives; I had never considered the negative impact it has had on black communities before! Overall, this collection, which seemed to target an adult audience but is ironically formatted as if it is a children's book, allowed me study the topic of desegregation more thoroughly, from the personal experiences of many, instead of from a dry, nonfiction account of it. For teachers: I recommend the poem in here by Eloise Greenfield, "Desegregation" for teachers to use in any unit on desegregation (especially along with the picture book "Walking to School").

  6. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    A collection of very personal essays, memoirs, and poems by ten of America's best children's authors. Some of the entries would be appropriate for children, and others are written for adults. Each of the authors experienced and wrote about the Supreme Court decision and the society that required the decision be made in his and her own way. My favorite entries are a heart-wrenching story by Newbery Award winner Jerry Spinelli about a black friend during his childhood and an equally sad memoir by A collection of very personal essays, memoirs, and poems by ten of America's best children's authors. Some of the entries would be appropriate for children, and others are written for adults. Each of the authors experienced and wrote about the Supreme Court decision and the society that required the decision be made in his and her own way. My favorite entries are a heart-wrenching story by Newbery Award winner Jerry Spinelli about a black friend during his childhood and an equally sad memoir by Newbery Award winner Lois Lowry about a black foster child who came to stay with her family during the summer. Also included in the collection are pieces by Eloise Greenfield, Quincy Troupe, Katherine Paterson, Joyce Carol Thomas, Machael Cart, Ishmael Reed, Jean Craighead George, and Leona Nicholas Welch. The material was collected and edited by Joyce Carol Thomas and published in 2003 to honor the 50th anniversary of Brown. Warm and wonderful full-page color illustrations by Curtis James accompany most of the entries.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    As much as this book is important for helping students understand the implications of Brown vs The Board of Education, I just couldn't figure out who the target audience is. Each of the essays are written with children in mind but they are dissimilar in style. I think students would find one or two of the stories/essays that would speak to them without the help of a teacher or an adult. On a positive note, reading the essays gave me some new thoughts about the down-side of Brown. interesting. As much as this book is important for helping students understand the implications of Brown vs The Board of Education, I just couldn't figure out who the target audience is. Each of the essays are written with children in mind but they are dissimilar in style. I think students would find one or two of the stories/essays that would speak to them without the help of a teacher or an adult. On a positive note, reading the essays gave me some new thoughts about the down-side of Brown. interesting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mollie

    This book is a compilation of short stories by various authors. I read aloud two selections from this book to my students for my graduate thesis. The stories were eye-opening and invoked critical responses from my students. I was thankful they had such strong reactions. This would be a great book to read aloud in a history class for both young and old students.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This book is interesting because it illustrates the many effects of the case of Brown v. The Board of Education. Specifically, it acknowledges that there were some drawbacks as well as benefits and that America still has work to do as far as desegregating schools.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Debrarian

    Stories & essays by well-known authors reflecting on the times around that decision and since.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Excited to share a few of the examples with my students. Just finished Jerry Spinelli's Maniac Magee, so excited to read them his piece. Excited to share a few of the examples with my students. Just finished Jerry Spinelli's Maniac Magee, so excited to read them his piece.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    A collection of writings and reactions from children's authors. Perhaps most interesting was the discussion of the negative impacts of the desegregation ruling. A collection of writings and reactions from children's authors. Perhaps most interesting was the discussion of the negative impacts of the desegregation ruling.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Audra

    Young adult authors reflecting on their lives in relation to Brown vs. Board of Ed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    This book contains a collection of stories, poems, and personal reflections written by famous authors based on the Brown v. Board of Education decision.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Abbey Pignatari

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lene Hartvig

  18. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carol Curley

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kiana

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peggy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  23. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashleigh Jennina

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danica

  27. 4 out of 5

    Renee

  28. 5 out of 5

    Judith

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

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