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Poe: Stories and Poems: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

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In a thrilling adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe s best-known works, acclaimed artist-adapter Gareth Hinds translates Poe's dark genius into graphic-novel format. It is true that I am nervous. But why will you say that I am mad? In "The Cask of Amontillado," a man exacts revenge on a disloyal friend at carnival, luring him into catacombs below the city. In "The Masque of the R In a thrilling adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe s best-known works, acclaimed artist-adapter Gareth Hinds translates Poe's dark genius into graphic-novel format. It is true that I am nervous. But why will you say that I am mad? In "The Cask of Amontillado," a man exacts revenge on a disloyal friend at carnival, luring him into catacombs below the city. In "The Masque of the Red Death," a prince shielding himself from plague hosts a doomed party inside his abbey stronghold. A prisoner of the Spanish Inquisition, faced with a swinging blade and swarming rats, can t see his tormentors in "The Pit and the Pendulum," and in "The Tell-Tale Heart," a milky eye and a deafening heartbeat reveal the effects of conscience and creeping madness. Alongside these tales are visual interpretations of three poems "The Raven," "The Bells," and Poe s poignant elegy to lost love, "Annabel Lee." The seven concise graphic narratives, keyed to thematic icons, amplify and honor the timeless legacy of a master of gothic horror."


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In a thrilling adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe s best-known works, acclaimed artist-adapter Gareth Hinds translates Poe's dark genius into graphic-novel format. It is true that I am nervous. But why will you say that I am mad? In "The Cask of Amontillado," a man exacts revenge on a disloyal friend at carnival, luring him into catacombs below the city. In "The Masque of the R In a thrilling adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe s best-known works, acclaimed artist-adapter Gareth Hinds translates Poe's dark genius into graphic-novel format. It is true that I am nervous. But why will you say that I am mad? In "The Cask of Amontillado," a man exacts revenge on a disloyal friend at carnival, luring him into catacombs below the city. In "The Masque of the Red Death," a prince shielding himself from plague hosts a doomed party inside his abbey stronghold. A prisoner of the Spanish Inquisition, faced with a swinging blade and swarming rats, can t see his tormentors in "The Pit and the Pendulum," and in "The Tell-Tale Heart," a milky eye and a deafening heartbeat reveal the effects of conscience and creeping madness. Alongside these tales are visual interpretations of three poems "The Raven," "The Bells," and Poe s poignant elegy to lost love, "Annabel Lee." The seven concise graphic narratives, keyed to thematic icons, amplify and honor the timeless legacy of a master of gothic horror."

30 review for Poe: Stories and Poems: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

  1. 5 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    I do love when graphic books make classics more accessible. I'm not sure if these were the full stories though? The poems in here seemed complete (I really like the Anabel Lee poem...maybe because of Lady Midnight ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ who can know for sure). I haven't the faintest what the Raven is actually about except it's not quoting someone evermore. The art was really good too! Very grim and dark and the prevailing colours were BLACK and bLACKER. A very full palette. Poe would be proud. I have to...uh, I do love when graphic books make classics more accessible. I'm not sure if these were the full stories though? The poems in here seemed complete (I really like the Anabel Lee poem...maybe because of Lady Midnight ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ who can know for sure). I haven't the faintest what the Raven is actually about except it's not quoting someone evermore. The art was really good too! Very grim and dark and the prevailing colours were BLACK and bLACKER. A very full palette. Poe would be proud. I have to...uh, say. After reading the first two stories though; the overall topic is just "here are some people tHEN THEY ALL DIE GRUESOMELY." Like wtf, Poe, do you need to talk to someone. A guy annoyed another guy so he chained him up and built him into a wall. Anyway. That was my cheery sunday afternoon reading how are you 🤗

  2. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    I never turn down a good excuse to pick up a story or two of Poe's, and this collection has the utmost horror classics, naturally: The Masque of the Red Death, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Bells, Annabel Lee, and The Raven. The artwork in this adaptation is gorgeous and feels so fitting to Poe's particular brand of horror, as it's understated yet gruesome. I am definitely interested in picking up a hard copy of this adaptation in the future, and can I never turn down a good excuse to pick up a story or two of Poe's, and this collection has the utmost horror classics, naturally: The Masque of the Red Death, The Cask of Amontillado, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Bells, Annabel Lee, and The Raven. The artwork in this adaptation is gorgeous and feels so fitting to Poe's particular brand of horror, as it's understated yet gruesome. I am definitely interested in picking up a hard copy of this adaptation in the future, and can't wait to read more of Gareth's adaptations! Thank you to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for the ARC! All opinions expressed here are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Hinds is one of the premier graphic adaptors of great literature for young people. Here he adapts the core of stories and poems from Poe most children read in school, so it's good for helping us see the horror Poe intends, dark, swirling art to get at the dark emotions Poe explores. Included: Masque of the Read Death, The Cask of Amontillado, Annabel Lee, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Bells, the Raven with a concluding illustrator/adaptor's note on Poe and the lit included. Hinds is one of the premier graphic adaptors of great literature for young people. Here he adapts the core of stories and poems from Poe most children read in school, so it's good for helping us see the horror Poe intends, dark, swirling art to get at the dark emotions Poe explores. Included: Masque of the Read Death, The Cask of Amontillado, Annabel Lee, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Bells, the Raven with a concluding illustrator/adaptor's note on Poe and the lit included. No surprises on the selections, because these are the ones taught in schools, and they are, no surprise, classic for good reason. I liked it surprisingly much given it looked like a predictable collection, but Hinds is terrific, and he makes these stories and poems come alive, maybe especially for struggling readers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Edgar Allen Poe has always been one of my favorite authors. This collection of Poe's Stories and Poems are adapted to the comic medium by Gareth Hinds. Hinds, in the past, has done creditable adaptions of other classic tales. For the most part this continues in this volume dedicated to Poe. Generally speaking I am not a fan of abridged versions of tales, unless you're a child, as it distorts the author's original ideas to make room for modern sensibilities. For the most part, this edition does th Edgar Allen Poe has always been one of my favorite authors. This collection of Poe's Stories and Poems are adapted to the comic medium by Gareth Hinds. Hinds, in the past, has done creditable adaptions of other classic tales. For the most part this continues in this volume dedicated to Poe. Generally speaking I am not a fan of abridged versions of tales, unless you're a child, as it distorts the author's original ideas to make room for modern sensibilities. For the most part, this edition does the best it can and it isn't overly irritating. The Masque of the Red Death, the Cask of Amontillado, Annabel Lee, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Bells and the Raven are the seven stories highlighted in this book. Each story is accompanied by illustrations that help bring to life the story. The artwork is decent and seems to work well with Poe's melancholic prose. Each story is also preceded by a legend that shows the various motifs that seem to recur in Poe's writings- such as Angel and Demons, Death, Insanity, Murder, etc. It is interesting but unnecessary, at least to me. Still over all this is a good collection of excellent Poe tales with artwork that helps illustrate some of the themes in these tales. If you're a Poe fan or would like to introduce someone to Poe's wonderful imagination, then this is a good edition. Even if you know nothing about Poe (that is a shame) this is a great introduction to the man. Gareth Hinds continues to churn out good versions of classic tales in a comic medium. Not an easy feat. Well done!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Becky - Pug and Books

    Poe: Stories and Poems: A Graphic Novel Adaptation by Gareth Hinds Star Rating: ★★★★★ 5/5 stars Format: ebook galley Summary: A selection of short stories and poems by Edgar Allan Poe presented in graphic novel form. Review: I received an advanced galley copy of this book from NetGalley for review. I love the gothic genre, and really no one author encapsulates that genre quite like Edgar Allan Poe. So I was pretty interested in a graphic novel using his stories. I wasn't sure how it would work out Poe: Stories and Poems: A Graphic Novel Adaptation by Gareth Hinds Star Rating: ★★★★★ 5/5 stars Format: ebook galley Summary: A selection of short stories and poems by Edgar Allan Poe presented in graphic novel form. Review: I received an advanced galley copy of this book from NetGalley for review. I love the gothic genre, and really no one author encapsulates that genre quite like Edgar Allan Poe. So I was pretty interested in a graphic novel using his stories. I wasn't sure how it would work out but I was willing to give it a shot. I liked the graphic novel, I thought that the art was nice. That was my main focus while reading, since I already knew the stories. I thought the art style fit with the stories, they fit the moods of them. I liked how in The Cask of Amontillado that the man that becomes trapped is dressed like a jester. It's very fitting for him to be dressed as a "fool". I was impressed that they included poems and not just stories. I can see how someone would decide to leave those out in favor of focusing on stories. Poems just don't come to the mind when thinking graphic novel but it totally works. I think the nature of Poe's poems definitely help. I am definitely interested in Gareth Hind's other work. He's done a lot of turning classic literature into graphic novels and I would like to see how those all turned out. Recommendation: If you are interested in Poe then give this graphic novel a chance.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Adams

    A stunning graphic adaptation of 7 pieces by Edgar Allan Poe. "Annabelle Lee" and "The Raven" are the only ones included in their entirety, but the emphasis is on tone, theme, and imagery. With footnotes suited for middle-grade students, this is a wonderful piece. A stunning graphic adaptation of 7 pieces by Edgar Allan Poe. "Annabelle Lee" and "The Raven" are the only ones included in their entirety, but the emphasis is on tone, theme, and imagery. With footnotes suited for middle-grade students, this is a wonderful piece.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Morris

    I can’t rave enough about this graphic novel. The artwork is beautiful and the style changes for each work to perfectly fit the mood. It’s an excellent introduction to Poe’s works for the younger set and even includes a theme guide at the beginning of each work. In the back is a piece on each story or poem that gives vital information into both its creation and Poe’s life in general. I can’t recommend this enough! Five enthusiastic stars. This unbiased review is based upon a complimentary copy pro I can’t rave enough about this graphic novel. The artwork is beautiful and the style changes for each work to perfectly fit the mood. It’s an excellent introduction to Poe’s works for the younger set and even includes a theme guide at the beginning of each work. In the back is a piece on each story or poem that gives vital information into both its creation and Poe’s life in general. I can’t recommend this enough! Five enthusiastic stars. This unbiased review is based upon a complimentary copy provided by the publisher.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Inna

    I found another book worth re-reading on Helloween🎃🎃🎃

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Confession time. I kinda sorta maybe don't really like Edgar Allen Poe. As a self described fanatic for all things macabre I live in mortal terror of having my membership card in the freaky deaky we love dead things and sad poems club revoked entirely based on this fact. I just don't get him. All of his stuff sounds like a whiny emo boy and I always picture Kris Kattan's character Azriel from Saturday Night Live whenever I try to envision him. Like he's sitting at a rikkety wooden table writing b Confession time. I kinda sorta maybe don't really like Edgar Allen Poe. As a self described fanatic for all things macabre I live in mortal terror of having my membership card in the freaky deaky we love dead things and sad poems club revoked entirely based on this fact. I just don't get him. All of his stuff sounds like a whiny emo boy and I always picture Kris Kattan's character Azriel from Saturday Night Live whenever I try to envision him. Like he's sitting at a rikkety wooden table writing by a single candle, sighing dramatically every few seconds as the candle melts down and his wife is just going "Edgar turn the damn lights on! And would it kill you to go take a walk or something!? God just get out of the house and cheer up!" I get that we're dealing with a different time here and thus a different definition of scary but I've read plenty of what would be regarded as classic horror and supernatural stories that scared the bejesus out of me. The House of the Seven Gables anything written by Shirley Jackson? Sign me the hell up. A raven tap tap tapping at the chamber door? Not so much. So I was somewhat dubious when I picked this one up but I thought a graphic adaptation might give me some notion of why exactly this guy continues to be so damn popular that people leaves roses on his grave. Alas, while Gareth Hinds is a very talented artist who does a lovely job visualizing these "classic" stories all I can really say about this is its worth looking at for the pretty pictures. This book contains all the classics; The Cask of Amontillado (probably my favorite given the ambiguous nature of the murderers relationship with his victim. I mean seriously WHY is he killing him? I have to KNOW!), The Telltale Heart (AGGHHH not the milky blue eye of revenge!!!!), The Raven, Annabelle Lee (which gets a lovely treatment depicting an interracial romance between a young black boy and a white girl and honestly beautiful scenes of the boy growing up and building an increasingly beautiful and elaborate monument of sand over her seaside tomb), The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Mask of the Red Death so if you're a Poe fan this is going to be pretty cool for you. The art is terrific and Hinds interpretation of the text is imaginative and really gets into the symbolism and gory beauty of the language. Alas this got me no closer to understanding Poe but it was worth a look.

  10. 5 out of 5

    TraceyL

    A wonderful visual representation of Edgar Allan Poe's works. This book includes seven of Poe's best stories and poems. My personal favorite has always been "The Masque of the Red Death", which is first in the book, and was very fitting to read today. I had never heard of two of the included stories, "The Cask of Amontillado" and "The Bells", and while I wouldn't consider either of them my favorites, they were interesting. The art style was really cool in this book, and it changed story by story. A wonderful visual representation of Edgar Allan Poe's works. This book includes seven of Poe's best stories and poems. My personal favorite has always been "The Masque of the Red Death", which is first in the book, and was very fitting to read today. I had never heard of two of the included stories, "The Cask of Amontillado" and "The Bells", and while I wouldn't consider either of them my favorites, they were interesting. The art style was really cool in this book, and it changed story by story. The illustrator put a lot of thought into the best way to portray each story. I also appreciated the footnotes that were included to explain the meaning of a few old-timey words. I highly recommend this graphic novel to anyone wanting a spooky read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Krista Regester

    Unpopular opinion time : I kind of hate The Raven.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jill Jemmett

    This collection of Edgar Allan Poe stories and poems begins with The Masque of The Red Death. In this story, Prince Prospero has a party in his castle, so his friends can escape the red death that is happening in the city. He has 7 different rooms, each decorated in a different colour. But when the clock strikes 12, an unusual guest makes his way through each of the rooms to the Prince. This is a very illustrative tale, because of the colours in each room. I loved the way that the colours even r This collection of Edgar Allan Poe stories and poems begins with The Masque of The Red Death. In this story, Prince Prospero has a party in his castle, so his friends can escape the red death that is happening in the city. He has 7 different rooms, each decorated in a different colour. But when the clock strikes 12, an unusual guest makes his way through each of the rooms to the Prince. This is a very illustrative tale, because of the colours in each room. I loved the way that the colours even reflected on the people in the images. The Tell-Tale Heart is one of my favourite Poe stories! A man doesn’t like his boss’s glass eye. He steals the glass eye and kills his boss. He chops up the body and hides it in the floor boards. When the police come to investigate the screams that were heard by neighbours, the man feels so guilty he ends up confessing to the whole thing. The images in this story were quite dark at times, but it was a good representation of the tale. The final poem in the collection is “The Raven,” Poe’s most famous work. I loved the illustrations for this poem. They really highlighted the raven, sitting on top of the door. It’s interesting that the narrator in this poem was illustrated as Poe himself. I love this poem and the graphics that went along with it were amazing. This is a great graphic novel. I really liked that there was a legend with the themes of Poe’s works, such as The themes of each story or poem were listed at its beginning. This makes the collection a great pick for young readers or people who are just being introduced to Poe’s stories and poems.

  13. 5 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    Warning: I will admit I have not read a lot of Poe's prose work (though I definitely intend to and I have read The Tell-Tale Heart and The Raven before) so if you want to know how true to the original material this comic is, I honestly don't really know. What's it about? This is a collection of various Edgar Allen Poe stories told in comic book format. Pros: Most of the stories are fantastic! The art is just perfect for the story-telling. The tone of this book is really creepy and cool. Sometimes olde Warning: I will admit I have not read a lot of Poe's prose work (though I definitely intend to and I have read The Tell-Tale Heart and The Raven before) so if you want to know how true to the original material this comic is, I honestly don't really know. What's it about? This is a collection of various Edgar Allen Poe stories told in comic book format. Pros: Most of the stories are fantastic! The art is just perfect for the story-telling. The tone of this book is really creepy and cool. Sometimes older horror can be cheesy but not Poe's stuff. He is a good horror author and this comic keeps a great creepy tone. No boring stuff. Always a bonus. Very suspenseful for sure! Cons: One problem I usually (though not always) have with short stories is that I can't really bring myself to care what happens to the characters, most of these are no exception unfortunately. I'm not exactly not entirely sure what happened in some of these stories to be perfectly honest. A few stories are told in a way that seems more like a picture book format more so than a comic book format which kinda bothers me. There's a big difference between narration in comics and picture book type storytelling which I'm not entirely sure if Hinds fully understands that. I will give it this: it's still a lot better than when people mix comics and prose (than again, almost anything's better than that). Overall: It's a great, creepy horror comic that I definitely recommend for libraries, fans of creepy comics or even just people looking to read something a bit different this Halloween. I had a few problems but they were pretty minor problems and most of it is pretty fantastic so it definitely earns... 4/5

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    'Poe: Stories and Poems' adapted and illustrated by Gareth Hinds is a pretty impressive work. I really liked the illustration as well as the adaptations. There are 7 stories and poems in this collection. They vary from the lesser known, like 'The Masque of the Red Death' and 'The Bells' to the more popular, like 'The Tell-Tale Heart' and 'The Raven.' The adaptations are superb, using Poe's own words. There is a key at the beginning of the book, so the reader will know if the story features things 'Poe: Stories and Poems' adapted and illustrated by Gareth Hinds is a pretty impressive work. I really liked the illustration as well as the adaptations. There are 7 stories and poems in this collection. They vary from the lesser known, like 'The Masque of the Red Death' and 'The Bells' to the more popular, like 'The Tell-Tale Heart' and 'The Raven.' The adaptations are superb, using Poe's own words. There is a key at the beginning of the book, so the reader will know if the story features things like insanity, or murder, or creepy animals. I'm not really sure what this key serves to do, but I liked it. There is an afterword by the author, which includes biographical information about Edgar Allan Poe. The final poem in the book is 'The Raven' and features a character that looks like Poe. The author also cleverly works in images from the preceding 6 stories and poems. I found this a brilliant touch and a true tribute this this master author and poet. I received a review copy of this graphic novel from Candlewick Press and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I am an over the top Edgar Allan Poe fan. From Poe tattoos to a room in my home devoted to the man, I eat up everything that I can with his name upon it. When I saw this graphic novel of Poe's works available for early review, I knew I had to request it. Poe's work pairs beautifully with the visual design of this graphic novel. The images brilliantly portray the horror, despair, and Gothic feel of Poe's stories, as well as the sadness and longing of his poetry. Since "The Cask of Amontillado" is I am an over the top Edgar Allan Poe fan. From Poe tattoos to a room in my home devoted to the man, I eat up everything that I can with his name upon it. When I saw this graphic novel of Poe's works available for early review, I knew I had to request it. Poe's work pairs beautifully with the visual design of this graphic novel. The images brilliantly portray the horror, despair, and Gothic feel of Poe's stories, as well as the sadness and longing of his poetry. Since "The Cask of Amontillado" is my favorite Poe story, I was especially interested to see how it would be visually portrayed and I was not disappointed. The horror of the bricking up of the wall is perfectly captured. I also enjoyed reading how Hinds picked the stories he was going to use and how he researched and drew inspiration for the book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Definitely a great new way to revisit these stories again!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caro

    This was an interesting one. I enjoyed all the stories. The art was really good and dynamic from story to story. I enjoyed reading the whole book and the ending 'credits' as well. Great for getting an opinion on how someone see's Poe's writing. Enjoy! This was an interesting one. I enjoyed all the stories. The art was really good and dynamic from story to story. I enjoyed reading the whole book and the ending 'credits' as well. Great for getting an opinion on how someone see's Poe's writing. Enjoy!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    So, Catherine became obsessed with Edgar Allen Poe at the very exact same age that I did while growing up. While we were in Philadelphia, we visited the National Park of one of his homes; we visited the home where he wrote The Tell-Tale Heart and The Black Cat, also the place where his wife died. Since being in that house, listening to a pretty scary rendition of The Black Cat and getting totally spooked because of an old A/C unit kicking on (we were in a back room, just Catherine, Charlotte, an So, Catherine became obsessed with Edgar Allen Poe at the very exact same age that I did while growing up. While we were in Philadelphia, we visited the National Park of one of his homes; we visited the home where he wrote The Tell-Tale Heart and The Black Cat, also the place where his wife died. Since being in that house, listening to a pretty scary rendition of The Black Cat and getting totally spooked because of an old A/C unit kicking on (we were in a back room, just Catherine, Charlotte, and I), running out of the room like we just saw the banshee, being stopped by the park ranger asking us what we saw (I guess a ghost supposedly had been spotted 3 times in the past by other visitors), Catherine can't stop reading Poe and getting totally spooked. On his last leave, Matt found this graphic novel and brought it home for Catherine. We have read a few of Gareth Hinds and have not been disappointed, yet. He does take artistic license, but does so with loving research (notes at the back of the book are fascinating).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    The artwork was great. I wish there was more tho

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul Franco

    Seven of the master’s most famous works rendered in visual form. Being a huge Poe fan might skew my opinion, but since my very favorite story isn’t in here, I don’t think it’ll be a problem. Was going to try to keep my comments to just the graphic novel’s depiction, but as usual my questions about the stories crept in when I wasn’t looking. Masque of the Red Death: Starts, appropriately enough, with a depiction of what the plague does to a human body. This is easily the most colorful of the storie Seven of the master’s most famous works rendered in visual form. Being a huge Poe fan might skew my opinion, but since my very favorite story isn’t in here, I don’t think it’ll be a problem. Was going to try to keep my comments to just the graphic novel’s depiction, but as usual my questions about the stories crept in when I wasn’t looking. Masque of the Red Death: Starts, appropriately enough, with a depiction of what the plague does to a human body. This is easily the most colorful of the stories, as it should be, considering the party rooms. This is also the most straightforwardly told, but that may be because it’s the first one. As I’ve wondered in the past, why did Poe name this protagonist Prospero? And how did the plague enter the sealed fortress after a few months had gone by? Cask of Amontillado: I will say the coloring in these scenes, particularly the burial basement, are accurate if not beautiful to look at: mostly darkness, with only the harsh yellow of artificial light to illuminate it. And I always thought Poe was being ironic, or sarcastic, in calling that unfortunate character Fortunado. Annabel Lee: This is the first story where the characters are dressed modern rather than period. This artwork makes the whole theme seem even sadder, from the shot of him on his knees sobbing into the ocean to his finished fortress of sand. It feels like no woman has ever been mourned more. The Pit and The Pendulum: The story is all black with white lines, since he’s trapped in the dark, until he finds the pit. The rats were a little too realistic for my taste. And this has always been one of my least favorite Poes, as I’m not a fan of the “saved in the nick of time” trope. The Telltale Heart: This has always been the go-to when it comes to showing the power of guilt. If anything, it’s a little too on-the-nose here, not subtle at all, but then there weren’t that many pages to work with. The Bells: Really isn’t much you can do artwise to show bells. Bells can be happy or sad, but they’re just the tool. The bright orange of the fire looks nice, though. The Raven: The protagonist looks just like Poe in these grayscale drawings. The raven is exquisitely drawn, with patterns in its wings. This poem isn’t as visual as the others, so not as much to work with here, though I thought the artist could have made more use of the references. Ends, rather fittingly, with his grave. The artwork is more picture book that graphic novel. As you’d expect, it’s literally and metaphorically dark. But I do have to admit that the images make the reading go by faster. At the end the author explains some of his choices, accidentally answering some of my own questions.

  21. 4 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    DNF @ 53% When you just can't bring yourself to pick up a book again, you know it's time to call it quits. This is not my first encounter with Poe. I read "The Cask of Amontillado" earlier this year. I've read "The Raven". And I think we might've explored "The Tell-Tale Heart" in a high school drama class many years ago. This volume collects many of the writer's most famous works and gives them a graphic novel treatment. Does it work? Well... no. Not really. Maybe if I hadn't read some of these on DNF @ 53% When you just can't bring yourself to pick up a book again, you know it's time to call it quits. This is not my first encounter with Poe. I read "The Cask of Amontillado" earlier this year. I've read "The Raven". And I think we might've explored "The Tell-Tale Heart" in a high school drama class many years ago. This volume collects many of the writer's most famous works and gives them a graphic novel treatment. Does it work? Well... no. Not really. Maybe if I hadn't read some of these on their own beforehand, I might've been more impressed. The problem I have is that what my mind can come up with while reading is much scarier than what's spelled out in the illustrations. I was underwhelmed by "The Masque of the Red Death", even though it started off with an interesting premise. "The Pit and the Pendulum" took me from suspense to eye rolls. "Annabel Lee" was a complete waste of time. But "The Cask of Amontillado" was what really clinched it for me. It's a lot less scary to see someone's speech bubbles full of "hahahaha!" than it is to read that someone was laughing maniacally. The graphic novel format turned what is a horrifying story with a terrifyingly sadistic main character into something I couldn't even take seriously. I didn't even get to "The Raven", but I really don't think there's much the author/illustrator could've done with it to improve upon the original. Read Poe's version (or watch the surprisingly amusing version The Simpsons did of it in one of their annual Halloween specials). As for the rest, I don't feel like I'm missing much. Some things are better left to the imagination. Trying to illustrate horror stories runs the risk of diluting the terror... which is exactly what happened here.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Read by Coco ✨

    4/5 ⭐️ Gareth Hinds truly does justice to the tone and ambiance of Edgar Allan Poe work. This graphic novel provides beautiful graphics to accompany the iconic works of Poe, and sometimes provides its own interpretation of the story (such as in The Tell-Tale Heart). It’s a quick read, and I wish there were more of it, but for what it is I am thoroughly impressed. This truly just reinforced my love for The Raven. I mean what a beautiful piece. It comes off the tongue like silk 🤤 4/5 ⭐️ Gareth Hinds truly does justice to the tone and ambiance of Edgar Allan Poe work. This graphic novel provides beautiful graphics to accompany the iconic works of Poe, and sometimes provides its own interpretation of the story (such as in The Tell-Tale Heart). It’s a quick read, and I wish there were more of it, but for what it is I am thoroughly impressed. This truly just reinforced my love for The Raven. I mean what a beautiful piece. It comes off the tongue like silk 🤤

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zephyr

    4 Stars Gareth Hinds's illustrations were definitely chilling enough to match Edgar Allan Poe's original tone. I also enjoyed the key at the beginning of each story which had a list of motifs to look out for in the particular passage. This is one of the better adaptations of Poe's work I have read, but it still doesn't quite live up to the standards that Poe set. Sorry, Hinds. 4 Stars Gareth Hinds's illustrations were definitely chilling enough to match Edgar Allan Poe's original tone. I also enjoyed the key at the beginning of each story which had a list of motifs to look out for in the particular passage. This is one of the better adaptations of Poe's work I have read, but it still doesn't quite live up to the standards that Poe set. Sorry, Hinds.

  24. 4 out of 5

    ✰ Alexandra ✰

    The art in this was gorgeous!! and of course, Poe is a genius!!! Review to come :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bojan

    The Cask of Amontillado is my favorite story in this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I love Poe, but in the past I've struggled with The Pit and the Pendulum. The illustrators set up was amazing. It gave me a new appreciation for these macabre tales. I love Poe, but in the past I've struggled with The Pit and the Pendulum. The illustrators set up was amazing. It gave me a new appreciation for these macabre tales.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lulu // the Book Rookery

    A huge fan of the works of Edgar Allan Poe, as well as of graphic novels, I jumped at the chance to read and review Poe: Stories and Poems: A Graphic Novel Adaptation by Gareth Hinds. Unfortunately, this was not up to snuff, leaving me feeling incredibly let-down. Though, truthfully, it might simply be that, again, I am not the intended audience. I have numerous anthologies of Poe’s works which I’ve loved since middle school. Poe’s sublime imagery and cadence resonate strongly. In this adaptation A huge fan of the works of Edgar Allan Poe, as well as of graphic novels, I jumped at the chance to read and review Poe: Stories and Poems: A Graphic Novel Adaptation by Gareth Hinds. Unfortunately, this was not up to snuff, leaving me feeling incredibly let-down. Though, truthfully, it might simply be that, again, I am not the intended audience. I have numerous anthologies of Poe’s works which I’ve loved since middle school. Poe’s sublime imagery and cadence resonate strongly. In this adaptation, the works are summarized, possibly to make reading easier as the adaptation also includes a recurring motifs legend to further make the works understandable. As it’s likely this is meant for a wider audience of middle and high schoolers, I feel compelled to give it three stars because it does make it easier to understand, and possibly more fun. However, I cannot give it anything higher simply because the art style does not convey the emotion Poe evokes. It does not feel dark, beautiful, dangerous, or mysterious. Instead, it feels very dated and almost pulpy but with an educational tone. If you know a student that is struggling with reading, or has Poe as an assignment, definitely try Poe: Stories and Poems: A Graphic Novel Adaptation by Gareth Hinds to whet their appetite, but don’t expect it to be anything more than a synopsis of Poe’s short stories. Additionally, buy the physical copy to ensure the formatting is as it should be (my kindle version was very much disjointed.) If you’re an adult, just buy the short stories or an anthology on its own. And if anyone else knows of another graphic novel adaptation with stronger imagery, please let me know!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I really love the way that Poe made his words flow together so harmoniously in his poetry. I'm now obsessed with The Bells. I really love the way that Poe made his words flow together so harmoniously in his poetry. I'm now obsessed with The Bells.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashley DeLuca

    Maybe a 4.5*. I really loved the interpretation of Poe's stories through the art. Especially with how Hinds portrayed the narrators of the stories. Would recommend for any level of Poe fan. Maybe a 4.5*. I really loved the interpretation of Poe's stories through the art. Especially with how Hinds portrayed the narrators of the stories. Would recommend for any level of Poe fan.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2017/11/1... I have been looking forward to this graphic novel adaptation by Gareth Hinds that recently came out, for his previous adaptions of classics such as Beowolf, Macbeth and The Odyssey have received rave reviews. I was not disappointed, although I didn’t feel it was a home run either. The Masque of the Red Death– Using vivid imagery, this story incorporates the theme of “death comes for us all” quite effectively. The Cas This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2017/11/1... I have been looking forward to this graphic novel adaptation by Gareth Hinds that recently came out, for his previous adaptions of classics such as Beowolf, Macbeth and The Odyssey have received rave reviews. I was not disappointed, although I didn’t feel it was a home run either. The Masque of the Red Death– Using vivid imagery, this story incorporates the theme of “death comes for us all” quite effectively. The Cask of Amontillado– Revenge most sweet. Fortunato insulted Montresor one too many times, and his own vanity led to his demise with no guilt from Montresor. I have to admit this story appealed to me, for don’t we all at times wish revenge on those that have wronged us? Annabel Lee– My favorite of Poe’s works, hands down. The poem of lost love and eternal devotion has always appealed to me. I didn’t care for the illustrations for this poem initially, but his interpretation of sacrifice and years going by, grew on me. The Pit and the Pendulum– Hind’s illustrations were evocative of the fear of the unknown as the prisoner awakes in a jail cell, in which he is tortured by unseen guards and has to use cunning to escape. The Tell-Tale Heart– An interesting retelling of the tale of a guilty conscience, Hines frames the confession coming from an inmate in an insane asylum. The Bells– I was not familiar with this poem, but the imagery Hines paired with the stanzas helped build the rhythm, and truly made the bell chimes seem real in your ears. The Raven– Another of Poe’s stories that lament lost love, Hinds makes the choice to make the narrator look like Poe to great effect. This story’s illustrations were my favorite, and he incorporated little visuals from the other stories into this story. The classical motifs were represented and the raven aptly symbolized the narrator’s grief and his descent into madness. The illustration style skews young, where I almost felt I should place it in the Juvenile collection at my library, did it not have such dark themes of murder and violence. I feel that this is a strong adaptation, and with the author’s notes about Poe and his stories, it is an excellent introduction for younger readers to then make the choice to study Poe’s additional works.

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