Hot Best Seller

A Life for Christ: What the Normal Christian Life Should Look Like

Availability: Ready to download

It would be good that all the LORD’s people were prophets and that the LORD would put his spirit upon them! – Numbers 11:29 In the church today, we have everything buttoned up perfectly. The music is flawless, the sermon well-prepared and smoothly delivered, and the grounds meticulously kept. People come on time and go home on time. But a fundamental element is missing. T It would be good that all the LORD’s people were prophets and that the LORD would put his spirit upon them! – Numbers 11:29 In the church today, we have everything buttoned up perfectly. The music is flawless, the sermon well-prepared and smoothly delivered, and the grounds meticulously kept. People come on time and go home on time. But a fundamental element is missing. The business of church has undermined the individual’s need to truly live for Christ, so much so, that only a limited few are seeing their life impact the world. Dwight L. Moody takes us deep into Scripture and paints a clear picture of what ought to be an individual’s life for Christ. The call for each Christian is to become an active member in the body of Christ. The motive is love for the Lord and our neighbor. The result will be the salvation of men, women, and children everywhere. Previously titled To the Work! To the Work! About the Author Dwight L. Moody, determined to make a fortune, arrived in Chicago and started selling shoes. But Christ found him and his energies were redirected into full-time ministry. And what a ministry it was. Today, Moody’s name still graces a church, a mission, a college, and more. Moody loved God and men, and the power of a love like that impacts generations.


Compare

It would be good that all the LORD’s people were prophets and that the LORD would put his spirit upon them! – Numbers 11:29 In the church today, we have everything buttoned up perfectly. The music is flawless, the sermon well-prepared and smoothly delivered, and the grounds meticulously kept. People come on time and go home on time. But a fundamental element is missing. T It would be good that all the LORD’s people were prophets and that the LORD would put his spirit upon them! – Numbers 11:29 In the church today, we have everything buttoned up perfectly. The music is flawless, the sermon well-prepared and smoothly delivered, and the grounds meticulously kept. People come on time and go home on time. But a fundamental element is missing. The business of church has undermined the individual’s need to truly live for Christ, so much so, that only a limited few are seeing their life impact the world. Dwight L. Moody takes us deep into Scripture and paints a clear picture of what ought to be an individual’s life for Christ. The call for each Christian is to become an active member in the body of Christ. The motive is love for the Lord and our neighbor. The result will be the salvation of men, women, and children everywhere. Previously titled To the Work! To the Work! About the Author Dwight L. Moody, determined to make a fortune, arrived in Chicago and started selling shoes. But Christ found him and his energies were redirected into full-time ministry. And what a ministry it was. Today, Moody’s name still graces a church, a mission, a college, and more. Moody loved God and men, and the power of a love like that impacts generations.

30 review for A Life for Christ: What the Normal Christian Life Should Look Like

  1. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne Morris

    I loved this book! Now I know why DL Moody was is so loved. While his words are challenging his love for humanity comes through on every page. I feel so encouraged and plan to read more of his writings.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melody Laila

    Beautiful. Basic. Raw Christianity as it should be. Taught by one of the Masters. Took my time reading it. Assimilating it. Absolutely recommend you read it and internalise it's message. Beautiful. Basic. Raw Christianity as it should be. Taught by one of the Masters. Took my time reading it. Assimilating it. Absolutely recommend you read it and internalise it's message.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Whereas I do not agree with all of the author's conclusions, only someone with a heart of stone would not tear up at the stories the author relates on people's devotion to a life for Christ. Whereas I do not agree with all of the author's conclusions, only someone with a heart of stone would not tear up at the stories the author relates on people's devotion to a life for Christ.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Aneko Press. All thoughts and opinions are my own.] This is the second book by the author I have read [1] and is part of its publisher's Christian Classic series [2]. My thoughts on the book are somewhat complicated because although the subtitle of the book suggests that the book deals with the way a normal Christian's life should look like, the book as a whole as the feel that it was written by a minister for others in the ministry, or to ordinary [Note: This book was provided free of charge by Aneko Press. All thoughts and opinions are my own.] This is the second book by the author I have read [1] and is part of its publisher's Christian Classic series [2]. My thoughts on the book are somewhat complicated because although the subtitle of the book suggests that the book deals with the way a normal Christian's life should look like, the book as a whole as the feel that it was written by a minister for others in the ministry, or to ordinary believers about the ministry. This by no means makes it a bad book, but rather gives it a different focus than I was personally expecting when I started reading it. Given this pastoral perspective, the book is written with a greater interest in how congregations and ministers behave than what a Christian life looks like, unless by a Christian life one means the institutional life of a Christian, an area of considerable interest to many of us as believers with a certain focus on churches and congregations. This is a short book, around 130 pages or so in length, and consists of nine chapters. The first looks at the power of regeneration through the resurrection, the second looks at issues of love, motive, and power with regards to service, the third looks at faith and courage, the fourth looks at the reward of faith, the fifth looks at enthusiasm, and the sixth looks at the power of little things. The last three chapters are extended discussions of Gospel passages dealing with doing what we can, who is our neighbor, and being the light of the world. Throughout the volume as a whole, there is a consistent mixture of personal stories, biblical exegesis, and a resort to the lives of famous leaders of the Protestant Reformation like Luther, Knox, and Wesley. Indeed, Moody seems to use the lives of these famous reformers in a sense similar to that of a Catholic view of the lives of the saints, which is a striking phenomenon to be sure, especially for his time. For those authors unfamiliar with Moody and his thinking, this book is certainly a fair introduction to the way he thinks and writes and is a worthwhile Christian classic. In reading this book, one gets a fair idea o the concerns that Moody has as a speaker and a writer. For one, he seems to have a particular fondness for melodrama, as evidenced by one story in the book about a young boy beaten by his parents for associating with an angelic missionary girl who ended up dying when a train ran over his legs while he was begging at a railway station. Indeed, overall he seems particularly concerned with issues of missionary focus, and this is the source of much of the book's humor. For example, in one passage the author contrasts the example of a missionary and a big game hunter, both of whom found what they were looking for in India--one of them souls to win and the other tigers to shoot. This is a book whose points are made more through rhetorical attempts at persuasive appeal than through logic, and those whose turn of mind is different than the author's are likely to find some of his reasoning more than a little bit strange and puzzling. That is not to say, though, that this is by any means a bad book. Indeed, even for those whose perspective on the Christian life can have much to gain by becoming familiar with such works that help us see how previous generations viewed such matters. And that use of reading older books as a way of acquiring an understanding and empathy for the people of the past is part of what helps classics like this one endure and remain relevant. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... [2] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2015... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Palmer

    Dwight L. Moody's style of writing in A Life For Christ is most reminiscent of modern preaching and is often used in today's post modern world. By this I mean he uses many personal experiences and emotional stories familiar to his audience in which he relates many Scriptural passages. I have often heard similar stories by preachers in Baptist churches in my lifetime. I didn't realize a lot of them came from this 19th century man of God. Moody's biggest theme throughout his book is lifestyle evang Dwight L. Moody's style of writing in A Life For Christ is most reminiscent of modern preaching and is often used in today's post modern world. By this I mean he uses many personal experiences and emotional stories familiar to his audience in which he relates many Scriptural passages. I have often heard similar stories by preachers in Baptist churches in my lifetime. I didn't realize a lot of them came from this 19th century man of God. Moody's biggest theme throughout his book is lifestyle evangelism: living a life so dedicated to the work of Christ that others will be so constrained by our love for God that they become converted. He emphasizes much the telling of the Gospel to our neighbors, which includes the whole human race no matter how desolate a soul they may be. His best chapters deal with Scripture on the woman, Mary, and her alabaster box as well as the Good Samaritan. The only criticism I feel should be mentioned is some of the language in use like "inquiry room". I am not sure what this is as churches don't have a labeled room like this anymore. I assumed it was a visitation alter or pastor's office. As a younger person active in 21st century race relations, I also balked at the translation using the word "slaves" for servants of Christ. It didn't bring up images of a dedicated love in the service of her/his Savior, but a negative image of misuse at the hands of a cruel Master. I'm not sure everyone will get that impression, but as an older millennial, I did.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Hedden

    I have read several books about D.L. Moody but I had never actually read anything that he and preached or written. I really enjoyed, A Life for Christ, it is a really simple book about what a Christian living a Jesus filled life should look like. It’s not preachy or condescending it just shows you how you can make a difference for the kingdom of God, how you can impact lives around you. When you read his words you see a true love for God and for the lost who need salvation. He shows you how a sim I have read several books about D.L. Moody but I had never actually read anything that he and preached or written. I really enjoyed, A Life for Christ, it is a really simple book about what a Christian living a Jesus filled life should look like. It’s not preachy or condescending it just shows you how you can make a difference for the kingdom of God, how you can impact lives around you. When you read his words you see a true love for God and for the lost who need salvation. He shows you how a simple kindness done with the love of Christ as your motivation can change the eternal destiny of not just the person you touched but by those they will go on to meet. All you need to do is what you can do; you don’t need to fill stadiums to make a difference. I also found it interesting that many during this time period didn’t feel the need to make sure their children were saved, that they would somehow choose to come to Christ when they were grown. What a terrible waste. When you read this book you come away feeling as though even the simplest things you do, when done with the backing of love, can make all the difference in someone’s life. This book was given to me by Aneko Press for my honest opinion. Read all of my reviews at Blessings N Bloggings

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nightshade

    I felt like the title was a little misleading. The majority of the book seemed to me to just be Moody complaining. Mostly about people going to the pub instead of being Christians and those that are Christian are not doing it 'right' or 'well enough'. I found it so interesting to see how things have changed since this book was written. I think Moody would despair if he saw the world as it is today! It was amazing how many anecdotes were packed into this relatively short e-book. Overall I'm not sur I felt like the title was a little misleading. The majority of the book seemed to me to just be Moody complaining. Mostly about people going to the pub instead of being Christians and those that are Christian are not doing it 'right' or 'well enough'. I found it so interesting to see how things have changed since this book was written. I think Moody would despair if he saw the world as it is today! It was amazing how many anecdotes were packed into this relatively short e-book. Overall I'm not sure this book gives a particularly good view of 'what the normal Christian life should look like' although I guess it depends upon your specific branch of Christianity. But basically it seems to read that if you aren't out there trying to convert people to Christianity every single day, then you shouldn't call yourself a Christian and God won't be pleased that you didn't try to save anyone else's soul.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kacey

    I really wish they hadn't re-titled this book. I probably would've read it anyway if it kept the original title, but this change is very misleading. Which isn't to say going out and telling the world about Christ isn't part of a normal Christian life, but that's all this book focused on. I was expecting more about different aspects of life where a person could live for Christ. That being said, this book does make some very valid points, and I can tell that Moody's heart is for Christ. We as Chris I really wish they hadn't re-titled this book. I probably would've read it anyway if it kept the original title, but this change is very misleading. Which isn't to say going out and telling the world about Christ isn't part of a normal Christian life, but that's all this book focused on. I was expecting more about different aspects of life where a person could live for Christ. That being said, this book does make some very valid points, and I can tell that Moody's heart is for Christ. We as Christians definitely do need to act more like we are Christians in our daily lives, and we do need to be more bold about telling the good news to others. I just feel like some of his examples don't really age well. It's still a good book. It will light the fire in your heart and make you more open to opportunities to share the gospel-- either through your life and actions or actually talking about it with someone else-- but the title needs to be changed back so it isn't so misleading.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    Zeal for the sharing of the gospel This Christian classic has stood the test of time for a reason; by no means are Moody's thoughts to be dismissed as outdated or irrelevant. The issues of the American Christian in the late 19th century are, interestingly enough, not so different from those of today. Moody preaches zeal for reaching the lost and offers remarkable encouragement for doing whatever little you can toward that end. Zeal for the sharing of the gospel This Christian classic has stood the test of time for a reason; by no means are Moody's thoughts to be dismissed as outdated or irrelevant. The issues of the American Christian in the late 19th century are, interestingly enough, not so different from those of today. Moody preaches zeal for reaching the lost and offers remarkable encouragement for doing whatever little you can toward that end.

  10. 5 out of 5

    sanjay christian

    Uplifting and exhorting! This is a simple yet deep read which made me hang on every word of each chapter with its truths and stories to increase understanding! You will be encouraged to shine your light in every place you step into simply by being an ambassador for Christ through your words and actions. Be an influence for Christ where you are....a simple truth that I need to follow!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Williams

    Given that the author died in 1899, I'm pleased to say that this book is by no means dated. It's wonderful message and the inspiration it conveys is just as alive now, if not more so. I loved reading Moody's personal experiences and gathered stories of how Jesus has touched the lives of so many. It was a pleasure to read from start to finish. Given that the author died in 1899, I'm pleased to say that this book is by no means dated. It's wonderful message and the inspiration it conveys is just as alive now, if not more so. I loved reading Moody's personal experiences and gathered stories of how Jesus has touched the lives of so many. It was a pleasure to read from start to finish.

  12. 4 out of 5

    William

    This book is well-written, evocative, and convicting. Those passages that are most dated are only more convicting today, such as when Moody expresses the remarkable ministry opportunities available thanks to the advent of the printing press and trains. If you read ebooks, you can even buy the kindle edition for free, so even cost should not stop you.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Karrel Buck

    So influential-still alive in Spirit As Moody says tell one person about Jesus every day for 365 days and see how life changes. Bring one person to know our Savior and watch as that one touches 100, etc. The true Law of Reciprocity. If you only read one book this year, read this one.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This was a reasonably good nonfiction book to encourage Christians to work for Christ, to serve and share as my church would put it today. There were a lot rambling anecdotes in this book, but there were several really good insightful quotes and illustrations as well. Some people might find the old-fashioned language to be hard to read, but I just found it amusing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    A much needed book for our time and all time! God is calling us to be a light. What does that mean? This book will inspire, motivate and teach us what being a light looks like! Like the example Moody uses about the blind man who keeps a lit lantern beside him....not so he can see but so others won’t trip over him. Be a light! In 2021...light your lamps!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sheila Myers

    Although written in the 1800s, the lessons in this book apply to Christians today. Dwight Moody did a wonderful job supplying examples from the Bible and day to day life to make his points and teach the lessons.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Justine Peroni

    A very thought provoking read Being in somewhat need of something different and closer to the heart, this book called out to me. It really helped me in my hour of need and turning to Christ and the scriptures was a blessing.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shanice Kok

    Leaving a legacy behind Helps once see Gods hand in our daily life and that he will never leave us nor forsake us. Making a difference as an individual is more than enough to lead other to christ

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linda Klager

    An excellent book to read. Mr. Moody gives all kinds of examples and Scriptures from the Holy Bible to help each person live an abundant life for Jesus Christ.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donna Peake

    Hard to believe this book was written in the 1800's. I shed a few tears. Hard to believe this book was written in the 1800's. I shed a few tears.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    "By this they will know us..." "By this they will know us..."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christine Proulx

    Surprisingly contemporary

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    Really enjoyed this book. Good mix of theological arguments and encouragement/instructions on living them out.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Justin Lamb

    Inspiring This is a very inspiring read. It will really make you self evaluate the life you are or are not living for Christ!

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Toma

    A fantastic book for stirring up evangelistic passion!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Burton

    Tells it like it is Thoughtful book. Clarified more of what put us on this earth. Helped me understand how important it is to win souls.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Paul Halbeck

    A book of life stories to encourage This book most of all encourages the reader to press on, as Paul said in Philippians 3:14 , and to fight the good fight of faith.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ulysses Harris

    This is a great book to help learn how to evangelize

  29. 5 out of 5

    Serena

    Very inspiring read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Kay

    Excellent Book D.L. Moody hits the nail on the head. The truths are just as relevant today as they were 100 years ago. Every believer should read this book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...