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Justice on Both Sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice

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Restorative justice represents “a paradigm shift in the way Americans conceptualize and administer punishment,” says author Maisha T. Winn, from a focus on crime to a focus on harm, including the needs of both those who were harmed and those who caused it. Her book, Justice on Both Sides, provides an urgently needed, comprehensive account of the value of restorative justic Restorative justice represents “a paradigm shift in the way Americans conceptualize and administer punishment,” says author Maisha T. Winn, from a focus on crime to a focus on harm, including the needs of both those who were harmed and those who caused it. Her book, Justice on Both Sides, provides an urgently needed, comprehensive account of the value of restorative justice and how contemporary schools can implement effective practices to address inequalities associated with race, class, and gender.   Winn, a restorative justice practitioner and scholar, draws on her extensive experience as a coach to school leaders and teachers to show how indispensable restorative justice is in understanding and addressing the educational needs of students, particularly disadvantaged youth. Justice on Both Sides makes a major contribution by demonstrating how this actually works in schools and how it can be integrated into a range of educational settings. It also emphasizes how language and labeling must be addressed in any fruitful restorative effort. Ultimately, Winn makes the case for restorative justice as a crucial answer, at least in part, to the unequal practices and opportunities in American schools.


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Restorative justice represents “a paradigm shift in the way Americans conceptualize and administer punishment,” says author Maisha T. Winn, from a focus on crime to a focus on harm, including the needs of both those who were harmed and those who caused it. Her book, Justice on Both Sides, provides an urgently needed, comprehensive account of the value of restorative justic Restorative justice represents “a paradigm shift in the way Americans conceptualize and administer punishment,” says author Maisha T. Winn, from a focus on crime to a focus on harm, including the needs of both those who were harmed and those who caused it. Her book, Justice on Both Sides, provides an urgently needed, comprehensive account of the value of restorative justice and how contemporary schools can implement effective practices to address inequalities associated with race, class, and gender.   Winn, a restorative justice practitioner and scholar, draws on her extensive experience as a coach to school leaders and teachers to show how indispensable restorative justice is in understanding and addressing the educational needs of students, particularly disadvantaged youth. Justice on Both Sides makes a major contribution by demonstrating how this actually works in schools and how it can be integrated into a range of educational settings. It also emphasizes how language and labeling must be addressed in any fruitful restorative effort. Ultimately, Winn makes the case for restorative justice as a crucial answer, at least in part, to the unequal practices and opportunities in American schools.

30 review for Justice on Both Sides: Transforming Education Through Restorative Justice

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    My team at work worked through this in the spring and I just finished it. This is a book about restorative justice and the challenges of using RJ in the school system. We have got to change the way we discipline our students and teach skills that will benefit all. This is an easy read and definitely scratches the service to restorative justice and gives some ideas of books to help conversations.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Drick

    Maisha Winn is a former elementary teacher turned Restorative Justice Communicator who seeks to help schools to adopt restorative justice as a paradigm for how they conduct their school. Her paradigm involves four stances - History - know the historical context of the school and students both locally and throughout US history; Race - ask how does race and racism impact how teachers view their students; Justice - what would a school where all students experience dignity and belonging look like; a Maisha Winn is a former elementary teacher turned Restorative Justice Communicator who seeks to help schools to adopt restorative justice as a paradigm for how they conduct their school. Her paradigm involves four stances - History - know the historical context of the school and students both locally and throughout US history; Race - ask how does race and racism impact how teachers view their students; Justice - what would a school where all students experience dignity and belonging look like; and Language - How do we talk about discipline, learning and who is successful and has potential. She then applies her paradigm to "Kennedy" High School in Madison, WI a school that had developed a restorative justice program with select students as circle keepers and a Justice Court. Only a few teachers and staff use RJ practices. She interviewed students, teachers, staff, and coaches showing how the theory and practice of restorative justice in schools still have a way to go. I appreciated the practical evidenced-based approach helping us see the challenges of applying RJ to school institutions.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Miss Norman

    3.5 stars so I rounded up. I had to read this book for my M.Ed class. I'm glad I read it because it held some good information and got my thinking about Restorative Justice but I must say... BORING, BORING, BORING! Do I recommend this for the everyday reader? Heck no. Too boring. Do I recommend this to all educators everywhere? Absolutely. Your students deserve your having this knowledge. 3.5 stars so I rounded up. I had to read this book for my M.Ed class. I'm glad I read it because it held some good information and got my thinking about Restorative Justice but I must say... BORING, BORING, BORING! Do I recommend this for the everyday reader? Heck no. Too boring. Do I recommend this to all educators everywhere? Absolutely. Your students deserve your having this knowledge.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Randa

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emily Carroll

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alaina

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jordyn Bjick

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cass Heigaard

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Phillips

  11. 4 out of 5

    Teri Adkins

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lena

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Phillips

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  16. 4 out of 5

    JF

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jessa Franco

  18. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Reed

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sara Smith-Sell

  20. 4 out of 5

    David Schnall

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ann Griffin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria Da Ponte

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christina Mitchell

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miranda

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ben Coffey

  26. 4 out of 5

    Karolina Rodriguez

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mat

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tami

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Edwards

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