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Toward What Justice?: Describing Diverse Dreams of Justice in Education

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Toward What Justice? brings together compelling ideas from a wide range of intellectual traditions in education to discuss corresponding and sometimes competing definitions of justice. Leading scholars articulate new ideas and challenge entrenched views of what justice means when considered from the perspectives of diverse communities. Their chapters, written boldly and pr Toward What Justice? brings together compelling ideas from a wide range of intellectual traditions in education to discuss corresponding and sometimes competing definitions of justice. Leading scholars articulate new ideas and challenge entrenched views of what justice means when considered from the perspectives of diverse communities. Their chapters, written boldly and pressing directly into the difficult and even strained questions of justice, reflect on the contingencies and incongruences at work when considering what justice wants and requires. At its heart, Toward What Justice? is a book about justice projects, and the incommensurable investments that social justice projects can make. It is a must-have volume for scholars and students working at the intersection of education and Indigenous studies, critical disability studies, climate change research, queer studies, and more.


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Toward What Justice? brings together compelling ideas from a wide range of intellectual traditions in education to discuss corresponding and sometimes competing definitions of justice. Leading scholars articulate new ideas and challenge entrenched views of what justice means when considered from the perspectives of diverse communities. Their chapters, written boldly and pr Toward What Justice? brings together compelling ideas from a wide range of intellectual traditions in education to discuss corresponding and sometimes competing definitions of justice. Leading scholars articulate new ideas and challenge entrenched views of what justice means when considered from the perspectives of diverse communities. Their chapters, written boldly and pressing directly into the difficult and even strained questions of justice, reflect on the contingencies and incongruences at work when considering what justice wants and requires. At its heart, Toward What Justice? is a book about justice projects, and the incommensurable investments that social justice projects can make. It is a must-have volume for scholars and students working at the intersection of education and Indigenous studies, critical disability studies, climate change research, queer studies, and more.

30 review for Toward What Justice?: Describing Diverse Dreams of Justice in Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yang

    A Canada-centric discussion on abolition and decolonization strategies; "a parallel politics of dialectical co-resistance. When Black peoples can still be killed but not murdered; when Indians are still made to disappear; when (Indigenous) land and Black bodies are still destroyed and accumulated for settler profit; it is incumbent upon all those who claim a commitment to refusing the white supremacist, capitalist, settler state, to do the hard work of building interconnected movements for decol A Canada-centric discussion on abolition and decolonization strategies; "a parallel politics of dialectical co-resistance. When Black peoples can still be killed but not murdered; when Indians are still made to disappear; when (Indigenous) land and Black bodies are still destroyed and accumulated for settler profit; it is incumbent upon all those who claim a commitment to refusing the white supremacist, capitalist, settler state, to do the hard work of building interconnected movements for decolonization” (Coulthard, 2014). The struggle is real. "P60

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pete

    An amazing collection of writings from scholars/activists on justice projects whose needs differ widely, yet somehow all fall together under what Tuck and Yang call the “rising sun of social justice.” The critiques are sharp, and the commitments to abolition and decolonization give the critiques a shape towards actualizing the calls for justice.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nate Madden

    This is one of the most influential books I've read, as a teacher and as a human. Read it. Re-read it. This is one of the most influential books I've read, as a teacher and as a human. Read it. Re-read it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Miguel

    "That said, incommensurability does not necessarily mean separations of great distance. Incommensurability can be quite close, as close as two people holding hands under the same sign. An ethic of incommensurability is apprehending the small inner angle made between those two beings and the sign above. A separation as wide as the earth is a small inner angle with respect to the stars above." (p. 2) "That said, incommensurability does not necessarily mean separations of great distance. Incommensurability can be quite close, as close as two people holding hands under the same sign. An ethic of incommensurability is apprehending the small inner angle made between those two beings and the sign above. A separation as wide as the earth is a small inner angle with respect to the stars above." (p. 2)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Faran Saeed

  6. 4 out of 5

    Stella

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  8. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  9. 4 out of 5

    Coly Chau

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

  11. 4 out of 5

    Campbell

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bailey Houghtaling

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Laham

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christina Ponzio

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  16. 5 out of 5

    Aimee Gauvin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Phiona

  18. 5 out of 5

    Spokanemadge

  19. 5 out of 5

    a.novel.femme

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aisha Guadalupe

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen Schroeder

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  24. 4 out of 5

    tshering y dorji

  25. 5 out of 5

    CJ Venable

  26. 5 out of 5

    Allie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Annie Pocklington

  30. 5 out of 5

    Isabelle Matson

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