Hot Best Seller

The Monkhood of All Believers: The Monastic Foundation of Christian Spirituality

Availability: Ready to download

Although the institution of monasticism has existed in the Christian church since the first century, it is often misunderstood. Greg Peters, an expert in monastic studies, reintroduces historic monasticism to the Protestant church, articulating a monastic spirituality for all believers. As Peters explains, what we have known as monasticism for the past 1,500 years is actual Although the institution of monasticism has existed in the Christian church since the first century, it is often misunderstood. Greg Peters, an expert in monastic studies, reintroduces historic monasticism to the Protestant church, articulating a monastic spirituality for all believers. As Peters explains, what we have known as monasticism for the past 1,500 years is actually a modified version of the earliest monastic life, which was not necessarily characterized by poverty, chastity, and obedience but rather by one's single-minded focus on God--a single-mindedness rooted in one's baptismal vows and the priesthood of all believers. Peters argues that all monks are Christians, but all Christians are also monks. To be a monk, one must first and foremost be singled-minded toward God. This book presents a theology of monasticism for the whole church, offering a vision of Christian spirituality that brings together important elements of history and practice. The author connects monasticism to movements in contemporary spiritual formation, helping readers understand how monastic practices can be a resource for exploring a robust spiritual life.


Compare

Although the institution of monasticism has existed in the Christian church since the first century, it is often misunderstood. Greg Peters, an expert in monastic studies, reintroduces historic monasticism to the Protestant church, articulating a monastic spirituality for all believers. As Peters explains, what we have known as monasticism for the past 1,500 years is actual Although the institution of monasticism has existed in the Christian church since the first century, it is often misunderstood. Greg Peters, an expert in monastic studies, reintroduces historic monasticism to the Protestant church, articulating a monastic spirituality for all believers. As Peters explains, what we have known as monasticism for the past 1,500 years is actually a modified version of the earliest monastic life, which was not necessarily characterized by poverty, chastity, and obedience but rather by one's single-minded focus on God--a single-mindedness rooted in one's baptismal vows and the priesthood of all believers. Peters argues that all monks are Christians, but all Christians are also monks. To be a monk, one must first and foremost be singled-minded toward God. This book presents a theology of monasticism for the whole church, offering a vision of Christian spirituality that brings together important elements of history and practice. The author connects monasticism to movements in contemporary spiritual formation, helping readers understand how monastic practices can be a resource for exploring a robust spiritual life.

56 review for The Monkhood of All Believers: The Monastic Foundation of Christian Spirituality

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melody Schwarting

    In The Monkhood of All Believers, Peters puts forth an ecumenical theology of monasticism, drawing on Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and even Protestant traditions. Rather than supplanting traditional/historical forms of monasticism, he adds a theology of "interiorized monasticism" to the discussion, making the monastic life accessible for all Christians. However, The Monkhood of All Believers reads like walking through an art museum while only looking at one side of the galleries, and thinki In The Monkhood of All Believers, Peters puts forth an ecumenical theology of monasticism, drawing on Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and even Protestant traditions. Rather than supplanting traditional/historical forms of monasticism, he adds a theology of "interiorized monasticism" to the discussion, making the monastic life accessible for all Christians. However, The Monkhood of All Believers reads like walking through an art museum while only looking at one side of the galleries, and thinking that you saw the whole collection. Peters's discussion of natural vs. unnatural asceticism was really helpful for me. Natural asceticism includes things like having a simple diet, a regular prayer habit, and wearing simple clothing. Unnatural asceticism is the extreme: making one's food distasteful, wearing hair shirts, and castrating oneself. The word "ascetic" often conjures up images of sitting atop poles and fasting into starvation, but distinguishing between natural and unnatural asceticism makes ascetic practices more accessible. We can all do with incorporating some natural asceticism into our lives, but unnatural asceticism often places the practice above the body, treating God's creation as a curse rather than a gift. I'd love to see a discussion of natural asceticism and eco-friendly living; I think they have a lot to say to each other. The subtitle, "The Monastic Foundation of Christian Spirituality," I found less than helpful. It should have been "A Theology of Monasticism." This isn't a book on Christian spiritual practices and their roots in monasticism. While a few things come up--such as praying the hours--it's not about the history of Christian spirituality. It is a theology of monasticism. I thought I would love this book but ultimately it didn't wow me. Perhaps it's because I felt like Peters was trying really hard to convince me of his project when I didn't need convincing. The monastic tradition is so rich and I have learned much from it, though I've only scratched the surface. Peters needs to grasp women's monastic traditions, because that's a huge hole in The Monkhood of All Believers. In certain parts of the book, I found the male bias justifiable, because obviously Peters can't get close access to living female monastics like he can male monastics. Yet, in other parts, it was confusing. You can't have a solid discussion about the history of Christian monasticism without even mentioning St Macrina the Younger. You can't have St Benedict without his holy twin, St Scholastica. Yet, Peters tries, and thus The Monkhood of All Believers fails to be for all believers. The Christian monastic tradition builds on a longer project of Christian ascetic practices, many of which come from early church martyrs. Women like Thecla, Perpetua, Felicitas, Blandina, and more shed their blood as the seed of the church. Their choices of sexual renunciation (Thecla & Blandina) and family renunciation (Perpetua & Felicitas) laid the groundwork for monastics like Anthony the Great. Macrina the Younger--considered a "spiritual Thecla" by her family--cast a vision for monastic equality that reverberates through the centuries. Leaving out the women isn't just a disservice to women; it leads to misinterpreting the men they inspired and with whom they partnered. Christ's body, the church, ceases to be a whole body if an arm or leg or both are missing. The family of God isn't just brothers. It's sisters, too, and "all believers" should really mean all believers. Abigail Adams is disappointed once more. I'm not personally angry with Peters, nor do I think he intentionally set out to ignore women. He's not the first author, and he won't be the last, to unintentionally deprive himself of the wisdom of his sisters in Christ. His argument would have been significantly stronger had he included female monastics, and his historical portions would have told the whole story rather than half of it. There were male monastics he should have dealt with in more detail, too, such as Ignatius of Loyola, who intentionally adapted some of his monastic practices for laypeople. I'd recommend this book to those who want to be convinced of the title, and anyone looking for a discussion of ecumenical monasticism. The Monkhood of All Believers reminded me why I love Anglicanism so much, because we can feast at a smorgasbord of all traditions without making ourselves feel uncomfortable. There's richness in all Christian spiritual traditions, and monasticism is the one that needs reframing for Protestants.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    Greg Peters, an Evangelical turned Anglican, believes the principles behind monasticism apply to all believers, not just to those who choose a cloistered life. Written for an academic audience, rather than a lay audience, the author includes illustrations from many fathers of the church. He uses Martin Luther from the Reformation period. The book includes nearly 800 endnotes and an extensive bibliography. Although published by a traditional Evangelical publisher, the book is more likely to reson Greg Peters, an Evangelical turned Anglican, believes the principles behind monasticism apply to all believers, not just to those who choose a cloistered life. Written for an academic audience, rather than a lay audience, the author includes illustrations from many fathers of the church. He uses Martin Luther from the Reformation period. The book includes nearly 800 endnotes and an extensive bibliography. Although published by a traditional Evangelical publisher, the book is more likely to resonate with a more moderate audience. I suspect a similar book aimed at a lay audience would sell well. I received an advance electronic copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jon Beadle

    An excellent defense of the new push to appreciate and appropriate monk-like perspectives in order to preserve Christianity for the next generation. For fans of Dreher’s The Ben Op, welcome to your new favorite book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthijs

    Iedere christen monnik Voor veel christenen is het geloof meer dan ’s zondags naar de kerk gaan. Zij vinden dat je als gelovige om in woord en daad je geloof moet uitdragen en vanuit je geloof je moet inzetten voor de kerk en de maatschappij. Deze christenen zeggen dan: iedere christen is ook discipel. Zelf heb ik altijd mijn aarzelingen gehad bij het benadrukken van discipelschap. Naar mijn idee komt de nadruk te liggen op de activiteiten die je doet vanuit je geloof, je inzet voor kerk en maats Iedere christen monnik Voor veel christenen is het geloof meer dan ’s zondags naar de kerk gaan. Zij vinden dat je als gelovige om in woord en daad je geloof moet uitdragen en vanuit je geloof je moet inzetten voor de kerk en de maatschappij. Deze christenen zeggen dan: iedere christen is ook discipel. Zelf heb ik altijd mijn aarzelingen gehad bij het benadrukken van discipelschap. Naar mijn idee komt de nadruk te liggen op de activiteiten die je doet vanuit je geloof, je inzet voor kerk en maatschappij. Greg Peters vervangt het woord discipel door monnik en stelt dat iedere gelovige een monnik is. Ik vind dat wel een mooi idee, omdat bij de gedachte dat elke gelovige monnik is de nadruk niet ligt op het doen, maar op het ergens zijn. Als discipel draag je bij aan de samenleving en de kerk, liefst nog om de samenleving te veranderen. Als monnik ben je aanwezig, wortel je je op de plek waar je woont. Meer dan bij het discipelschap gaat het bij het bestaan als monnik erom, dat dagelijks leven en geloof worden geïntegreerd. Daarbij vind ik het mooie dat bij de gedachte dat elke gelovige monnik is ook het contemplatieve, het dagelijks gebed, geduld en volharding wezenlijk onderdeel zijn van het dagelijks bestaan. Peters zal de discussie over discipelschap kennen. Hij groeide op als baptist, maar ging over naar de Episcopale (Anglicaanse) kerk en is nu hoofddocent Middeleeuwse en Spirituele theologie aan de Biola Universiteit (Californië). Met zijn boek The Monkhood of All Believers wil hij het waardevolle van monastieke leven als protestant doordenken. Voor Peters is het monastieke leven niet een uitzondering op hoe christenen leven, maar juist een manier van leven dat laat zien hoe de roeping als christen in het dagelijks leven gestalte krijgt en hoe geloof en dagelijks leven geen twee aparte werelden zijn, maar één zijn. Eén gerichtheid Bij de gedachte dat iedere gelovige monnik is, zal de eerste vraag zijn: moet iedere gelovige dan celibatair leven? Volgens Peters is het celibataire leven niet kenmerkend voor het bestaan als monnik. Kenmerkend voor het bestaan als monnik is dat het hart helemaal gericht is op God. Het hart is één in deze gerichtheid op God en is niet verdeeld door ook uit te gaan naar de wereld. Monnik komt van monachos. Met dat woord wordt niet het eenzame bestaan uitgedrukt, maar die ene gerichtheid van het hart op God. Men kan daarbij denken aan de eerste gemeenten die één van hart zijn (Handelingen 4:32). Of aan de Bergrede waarin Christus aangeeft, dat een volgeling van Hem volmaakt moet zijn (Mattheüs 5:48). Dat volmaakte van het hart heeft ook te maken met die éne gerichtheid op God. In beide teksten komt het woord monachos niet voor, maar zijn wel van belang om te begrijpen waar het in het monastieke leven om gaat. Vanaf het ontstaan van de kerk hebben gelovigen gestreefd om die volmaaktheid en die éne gerichtheid in praktijk te brengen. Daarvoor zonderden ze zich geregeld af en trokken ze zich terug. Oefenen Voor Peters is het van belang dat wat voor een monnik geldt ook voor een gelovige geldt. Ook een gelovige heeft dagelijks te bidden, de Bijbel te overdenken en zich te oefenen in die éne gerichtheid van het hart, te streven naar een heilig leven en te strijden tegen verleidingen, die de wereld biedt. Als er een verschil valt aan te geven, zou je kunnen denken aan de vormen van het geloof, zoals dagelijks gebed, waardoor het geloofsleven van een monnik meer gestructureerd is dan van een ‘gewone’ gelovige. Structuur Juist in dat meer structuur hebben zit de waarde van het bestaan als monnik voor gewone gelovigen. Ik merk bij mijzelf en bij mijn generatie dat geloof en dagelijks leven twee werelden dreigen te worden, omdat het dagelijks leven zoveel vraagt dat je aan het structureel onderhouden van je band met God niet toekomt. Er is wel een verlangen om meer uit het geloof te leven, maar in de praktijk verzandt het. Juist in dat meer structuur hebben zit de waarde van het bestaan als monnik voor gewone gelovigen. Streven naar een heilig leven In de loop van de traditie hebben monniken zelf ook veel nagedacht over hun manier van leven. Soms komen ze erop uit dat hun manier van leven superieur is aan dat van ‘gewone’ gelovigen. In veel gevallen vinden zij echter dat het leven als monnik niet hoogstaander is, maar een van de vormen om christen te zijn naast andere vormen. De monnik levert alleen een voorbeeld voor andere gelovigen, hoe zij in hun eigen bestaan kunnen streven naar een heilig leven. Endokimov Peters sluit aan bij Paul Evdokimov (1901-1970), een Russisch-orthodoxe theoloog, die na de Russische revolutie naar Frankrijk vluchtte en daar in een nieuwe context moest nadenken over de waarde van zijn eigen traditie. Hij sprak over ‘het verinnerlijkte monnikendom’: de uiterlijke kenmerken van een monnik zijn niet het wezen van het monnikendom, maar hoe je innerlijk op God bent afgestemd. De drie monastieke geloften zijn in zijn ogen na te leven door elke gelovige: de gelofte van armoede, kuisheid en gehoorzaamheid. Evdokimov was van mening dat deze geloften bevrijdend werkten. Zijn gedachten werden opgepikt door Alexander Schmemann (1921-1983), die in de Amerikaanse context de waarde van de Russisch-orthodoxe traditie moest doordenken. Richtlijnen In alle hoofdstromen van het christendom is er een monastiek leven ontwikkeld. In al die vormen komt met uit op een ascetisch leven. In een ascetisch leven gaat het niet om de regels, maar gaat het allereerst om leven in de werkelijkheid van Christus. De richtlijnen voor het ascetische leven moeten daar dienstbaar aan zijn. De richtlijnen en praktijken mogen voor ‘gewone’ gelovige anders zijn, de roeping is hetzelfde: leven in de werkelijkheid van Christus, tot eer van God en in dienst van de naaste. Dat leven in de werkelijkheid en volgens die roeping wordt gevoed door het voortdurend gebed, dat geïntegreerd is in het dagelijks bestaan. N.a.v. Greg Peters, The Monkhood of All Believers. The Monastic Foundation of Christian Spirituality (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic, 2018). Gepubliceerd in CW Opinie van 3 mei 2019

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richard Fitzgerald

    Greg Peters provides a robust theological history of monks in this book. There is a wealth of information, and he makes a convincing case that monkhood has never been viewed exclusively as the domain of cloistered communities under special vows (though that is the critical public face of monkhood). Peters traces the teachings on external and internal monkhood through church history, showing that internal monkhood is more fundamental than external. He argues successfully that people in society, e Greg Peters provides a robust theological history of monks in this book. There is a wealth of information, and he makes a convincing case that monkhood has never been viewed exclusively as the domain of cloistered communities under special vows (though that is the critical public face of monkhood). Peters traces the teachings on external and internal monkhood through church history, showing that internal monkhood is more fundamental than external. He argues successfully that people in society, even married, can and should be monks. It seems, though, that Peters has only completed the first half of the task this book needed to accomplish. He leaves us with a solid foundation for developing a theology of the monkhood of all believers and the practices that necessarily follow. But, he doesn't move into this final step. As such, the book remains a useful but merely theoretical treatise.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    The Monkhood of All Believers by Greg Peters is an ecumenical view of the history of monasticism. Going back to the beginning of monastic monks, Peters allows us to watch the advent and growth of this movement. The key to becoming a monk has been baptism. It is the only path. Peters brings this history from ancient times up to and including current practices. He even expands upon the role that monasteries can play in guiding spirituality. A multi-dimensional view that crosses religions helps the The Monkhood of All Believers by Greg Peters is an ecumenical view of the history of monasticism. Going back to the beginning of monastic monks, Peters allows us to watch the advent and growth of this movement. The key to becoming a monk has been baptism. It is the only path. Peters brings this history from ancient times up to and including current practices. He even expands upon the role that monasteries can play in guiding spirituality. A multi-dimensional view that crosses religions helps the reader understand the vastness of the benefits of the monastic life. It is reassuring to be in the hands of a skilled writer and historian when reading this book. It is inspirational and thoughtful.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John-Francis Friendship

    A fascinating and fresh take on the call we all have to realise our true being in God. Peters draws on the insights of others - not least Orthodox writers - to illustrate how there is an 'archetypal' monk in each of us. My only quibble with him would be that whilst not quite dismissing the Religious Life he doesn't give enough credit for the way that - just as we need an ordained priesthood to help us realise our common priesthood in Christ - we need the Religious Life to help us realise that to A fascinating and fresh take on the call we all have to realise our true being in God. Peters draws on the insights of others - not least Orthodox writers - to illustrate how there is an 'archetypal' monk in each of us. My only quibble with him would be that whilst not quite dismissing the Religious Life he doesn't give enough credit for the way that - just as we need an ordained priesthood to help us realise our common priesthood in Christ - we need the Religious Life to help us realise that to which we're all called. And, sadly, whilst he is an Episcopalian (Anglican) he makes no reference to the witness of our Religious (including monks and nuns) who constantly remind us of what we're called to - to seek and love God.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luke Evans

    Didn’t finish. Not what I expected. Also, not very good.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Williams

  10. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  11. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  12. 4 out of 5

    Thad

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bsheffler

  14. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Vojta

  15. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristyn DeNooyer

  17. 4 out of 5

    Noval Casteel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Williams

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matt Moser

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Wassen

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marc Shefelton

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rushing

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Hillaker

  27. 4 out of 5

    Baker Academic

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eun-hyeon Myeong

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jack De Vight

  30. 4 out of 5

    Koppany Jordan

  31. 4 out of 5

    Mandy DiMarcangelo

  32. 4 out of 5

    Chris Kamalski

  33. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  34. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Boerner

  36. 5 out of 5

    The Potter Family

  37. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Lundquist

  39. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  40. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  41. 5 out of 5

    Lori Bennett

  42. 5 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  43. 5 out of 5

    Satrin

  44. 4 out of 5

    Emily S.

  45. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

  46. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  47. 4 out of 5

    Julie Oxendale

  48. 5 out of 5

    Sue Waldron

  49. 4 out of 5

    Marti Wilson

  50. 4 out of 5

    Fran Whitley

  51. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  52. 5 out of 5

    Charissa Rate

  53. 4 out of 5

    F

  54. 5 out of 5

    Valencia Lewis

  55. 4 out of 5

    Jerrilynn Atherton

  56. 4 out of 5

    Allison Hanley

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...