Hot Best Seller

Artifictional Intelligence: Against Humanity's Surrender to Computers

Availability: Ready to download

Recent startling successes in machine intelligence using a technique called 'deep learning' seem to blur the line between human and machine as never before. Are computers on the cusp of becoming so intelligent that they will render humans obsolete? Harry Collins argues we are getting ahead of ourselves, caught up in images of a fantastical future dreamt up in fictional por Recent startling successes in machine intelligence using a technique called 'deep learning' seem to blur the line between human and machine as never before. Are computers on the cusp of becoming so intelligent that they will render humans obsolete? Harry Collins argues we are getting ahead of ourselves, caught up in images of a fantastical future dreamt up in fictional portrayals. The greater present danger is that we lose sight of the very real limitations of artificial intelligence and readily enslave ourselves to stupid computers: the 'Surrender'. By dissecting the intricacies of language use and meaning, Collins shows how far we have to go before we cannot distinguish between the social understanding of humans and computers. When the stakes are so high, we need to set the bar higher: to rethink 'intelligence' and recognize its inherent social basis. Only if machine learning succeeds on this count can we congratulate ourselves on having produced artificial intelligence.


Compare

Recent startling successes in machine intelligence using a technique called 'deep learning' seem to blur the line between human and machine as never before. Are computers on the cusp of becoming so intelligent that they will render humans obsolete? Harry Collins argues we are getting ahead of ourselves, caught up in images of a fantastical future dreamt up in fictional por Recent startling successes in machine intelligence using a technique called 'deep learning' seem to blur the line between human and machine as never before. Are computers on the cusp of becoming so intelligent that they will render humans obsolete? Harry Collins argues we are getting ahead of ourselves, caught up in images of a fantastical future dreamt up in fictional portrayals. The greater present danger is that we lose sight of the very real limitations of artificial intelligence and readily enslave ourselves to stupid computers: the 'Surrender'. By dissecting the intricacies of language use and meaning, Collins shows how far we have to go before we cannot distinguish between the social understanding of humans and computers. When the stakes are so high, we need to set the bar higher: to rethink 'intelligence' and recognize its inherent social basis. Only if machine learning succeeds on this count can we congratulate ourselves on having produced artificial intelligence.

45 review for Artifictional Intelligence: Against Humanity's Surrender to Computers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charles Thorpe

    Brilliant insight into what makes us human - our sociality, how language is embedded in social community and how human cognition, expertise, understanding, and intelligence are social accomplishments. What humans can do that machines can't do, despite the advances that A.I. has made, is all about the way in which human beings are social beings, what Collins calls 'socialness' and how this allows us to engage in polimorphic action. An important and profound book, written in Collins' accessible an Brilliant insight into what makes us human - our sociality, how language is embedded in social community and how human cognition, expertise, understanding, and intelligence are social accomplishments. What humans can do that machines can't do, despite the advances that A.I. has made, is all about the way in which human beings are social beings, what Collins calls 'socialness' and how this allows us to engage in polimorphic action. An important and profound book, written in Collins' accessible and amusing and style. An enjoyable read. Philosophical sociology at its best.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bogdan Balostin

    Amazing and eye-opening book concerning the social side of AI and why AI may never be intelligent no matter how many resources we pour in, or how smart it appears to be. It's kind of sad in a way. At the same time, everything in this book makes sense. We are humans living in society, and our intelligence is dependent on our culture, even in scientific areas of expertise. On the other hand, maybe we are beings that function on brute force principle and our brain works on mathematics. This feeling Amazing and eye-opening book concerning the social side of AI and why AI may never be intelligent no matter how many resources we pour in, or how smart it appears to be. It's kind of sad in a way. At the same time, everything in this book makes sense. We are humans living in society, and our intelligence is dependent on our culture, even in scientific areas of expertise. On the other hand, maybe we are beings that function on brute force principle and our brain works on mathematics. This feeling when we get something right may be just the result of inner reward when our neural network gets the right answer and thus reinforce our weight for a certain node in the network. If you agree with that then maybe AI will be intelligent, they have the same feeling, but it will be written in code instead of organic matter. If you don't really agree, then it's hard to think how AI will ever be intelligent and we need a new paradigm shift in how we approach AI and the difference between brute-force intelligence (statistical intelligence) and real intelligence (which we still cannot define, but we know it's the kind that humans have).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    An older white middle class man and his fears of unknown.

  4. 4 out of 5

    BCS

    Author Harry Collins, a research professor at the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University, has produced a very readable tome that asks: ’how far do we still need to go before we arrive at a point in time where we cannot distinguish between the social understanding of humans and computers?’ While the successes of ‘deep learning’ seem to be blurring the line between human and machine, Collins rightly argues that we are getting ahead of ourselves, caught up in the realms of science fiction a Author Harry Collins, a research professor at the School of Social Sciences at Cardiff University, has produced a very readable tome that asks: ’how far do we still need to go before we arrive at a point in time where we cannot distinguish between the social understanding of humans and computers?’ While the successes of ‘deep learning’ seem to be blurring the line between human and machine, Collins rightly argues that we are getting ahead of ourselves, caught up in the realms of science fiction and not of science fact. The author suggests that we need, collectively, to rethink and redefine what we call ‘intelligence’. Take, for example, a human’s learned abilities with language and being able to ‘repair’ and fill in the gaps of other people’s communications towards us. We instinctively are able to make mental adjustments to allow for the slurring of words, jumbled letters or partly completed sentences and still understand what our fellow humans are trying to say to us, but computers, at present, cannot do this kind of ‘repair’. The key component of Collin’s thesis, if you like, is that without some degree of socialization computers will never truly be ‘intelligent’ in the truest sense of the word. Humans develop social skills that allow them to integrate into society over a lengthy period of time. Much of this socialisation involves our connecting with other humans through our bodies and interpreting physical signals, something our current AIs struggle to do. Collins talks about there being six levels of artificial intelligence, starting from Level 1’s ‘engineered intelligence’, which we already live with, through Level IV’s ‘humanity challenging culture consumers’, right through to Level VI and its ‘autonomous alien societies’. The author urges us to avoid creating a Silicon Reich, and move away from letting ourselves be dictated to by stupid computers who only understand black and white concepts, and move toward a more positive future where human-like computers will be as context-sensitive as the humans that are living and working around them. Harry Collins has produced a fascinating book which posits as many questions as it tries to answer. One to be read and reread for sure. Review by Justin Richards Originally published: https://www.bcs.org/content/conWebDoc...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Terry Tse

    This book is a refreshing take on the AI, arguing from a sociologist's standpoint why machines cannot fully gain natural language fluency and hence human intelligence. So much what we call intelligence is socially embedded that unless we fully embed computers into human society, they can ever fully acquire the quality we recognize as human intelligence. The author writes in a lucid, flowing style so that the lay reader can grasp the complex and nuanced issues involved. This book is a refreshing take on the AI, arguing from a sociologist's standpoint why machines cannot fully gain natural language fluency and hence human intelligence. So much what we call intelligence is socially embedded that unless we fully embed computers into human society, they can ever fully acquire the quality we recognize as human intelligence. The author writes in a lucid, flowing style so that the lay reader can grasp the complex and nuanced issues involved.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    This was a bit of a difficult book to read. I am unfamiliar with some of the concepts and words that the author used. I also found some of his reasoning to be based on assumptions that were a bit shaky. The author's thesis is that we need to be wary of attributing intelligence to computers and therefore giving them too much authority or power over us.  I found his reasoning a bit muddy.  First, he seems to equate intelligence with linguistic competence. I am not sure that is a valid equivalence. This was a bit of a difficult book to read. I am unfamiliar with some of the concepts and words that the author used. I also found some of his reasoning to be based on assumptions that were a bit shaky. The author's thesis is that we need to be wary of attributing intelligence to computers and therefore giving them too much authority or power over us.  I found his reasoning a bit muddy.  First, he seems to equate intelligence with linguistic competence. I am not sure that is a valid equivalence.  Second, I suspect there are a lot of people who couldn't pass the kind of Turing test he says that computers must be able to pass to be deemed intelligent.  There are clearly many tasks that computers are much better at than we are so it is fine to turn those tasks over to them even if they aren't intelligent in the human sense.    In summary, I didn't think it was as good as Gravity's Ghost, perhaps because I am more familiar with physics than I am with sociology. Nevertheless, it was an interesting book even if I don't agree with the author's conclusions.

  7. 5 out of 5

    I Read, Therefore I Blog

    Harry Collins is a sociologist and Distinguished Research Professor at Cardiff University’s School of Social Sciences. This thought-provoking book takes a deep dive into what we mean by ‘intelligence’ and what it takes to pass the Turing Test, arguing that despite extraordinary developments in artificial intelligence, the Singularity is not at hand but we are in danger of fooling ourselves that it is and thus surrendering to ‘stupid’ machines.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steven Eisenberg

    It is denser than Lead. Required reading for anyone serious about understanding AI and it’s limits. Too many references to previous pages and passages for my taste. Don’t line looking back that often. But, boy, did I learn a lot.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Samir Passi

  10. 5 out of 5

    John Ambrose

  11. 5 out of 5

    SonicSherlock

  12. 4 out of 5

    Zhipeng Hu

  13. 5 out of 5

    Göran Bakken

  14. 5 out of 5

    sarahs

  15. 4 out of 5

    Teddy Zamborsky

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kanta

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sharad Pandian

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janet Homes

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lin Ding

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mari-Ann Lind

  21. 5 out of 5

    Yates Buckley

  22. 5 out of 5

    Silvana

  23. 5 out of 5

    Iskra

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hares Faiez

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  28. 5 out of 5

    Henrik Brattander

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aruna

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vu Nguyen

  31. 4 out of 5

    Han Hoe

  32. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  33. 5 out of 5

    Brock Vernon

  34. 4 out of 5

    Joiechen

  35. 5 out of 5

    Puspa

  36. 4 out of 5

    Madhur Shrimal

  37. 4 out of 5

    Ramya

  38. 5 out of 5

    Cath

  39. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  40. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  41. 5 out of 5

    Roger

  42. 5 out of 5

    Chad

  43. 4 out of 5

    Blaine

  44. 5 out of 5

    Mary-Anne

  45. 5 out of 5

    Conor

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...