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Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone: Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education

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Advocates for the rights of people with disabilities have worked hard to make universal design in the built environment “just part of what we do.” We no longer see curb cuts, for instance, as accommodations for people with disabilities, but perceive their usefulness every time we ride our bikes or push our strollers through crosswalks. This is also a perfect model for Unive Advocates for the rights of people with disabilities have worked hard to make universal design in the built environment “just part of what we do.” We no longer see curb cuts, for instance, as accommodations for people with disabilities, but perceive their usefulness every time we ride our bikes or push our strollers through crosswalks. This is also a perfect model for Universal Design for Learning (UDL), a framework grounded in the neuroscience of why, what, and how people learn. Tobin and Behling show that, although it is often associated with students with disabilities, UDL can be profitably broadened toward a larger ease-of-use and general diversity framework. Captioned instructional videos, for example, benefit learners with hearing impairments but also the student who worries about waking her young children at night or those studying on a noisy team bus. Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone is aimed at faculty members, faculty-service staff, disability support providers, student-service staff, campus leaders, and graduate students who want to strengthen the engagement, interaction, and performance of all college students. It includes resources for readers who want to become UDL experts and advocates: real-world case studies, active-learning techniques, UDL coaching skills, micro- and macro-level UDL-adoption guidance, and use-them-now resources.


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Advocates for the rights of people with disabilities have worked hard to make universal design in the built environment “just part of what we do.” We no longer see curb cuts, for instance, as accommodations for people with disabilities, but perceive their usefulness every time we ride our bikes or push our strollers through crosswalks. This is also a perfect model for Unive Advocates for the rights of people with disabilities have worked hard to make universal design in the built environment “just part of what we do.” We no longer see curb cuts, for instance, as accommodations for people with disabilities, but perceive their usefulness every time we ride our bikes or push our strollers through crosswalks. This is also a perfect model for Universal Design for Learning (UDL), a framework grounded in the neuroscience of why, what, and how people learn. Tobin and Behling show that, although it is often associated with students with disabilities, UDL can be profitably broadened toward a larger ease-of-use and general diversity framework. Captioned instructional videos, for example, benefit learners with hearing impairments but also the student who worries about waking her young children at night or those studying on a noisy team bus. Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone is aimed at faculty members, faculty-service staff, disability support providers, student-service staff, campus leaders, and graduate students who want to strengthen the engagement, interaction, and performance of all college students. It includes resources for readers who want to become UDL experts and advocates: real-world case studies, active-learning techniques, UDL coaching skills, micro- and macro-level UDL-adoption guidance, and use-them-now resources.

30 review for Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone: Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Are you an educator? Do you want to be a good one? If you said yes, read this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wiebke Kuhn

    This book is an essential read for anyone interested in providing more access to more students to the resources a university provides. Scaffolding from small steps we can take as individuals (whether we are faculty, support, or administrators) over awareness-raising strategies to full-unit and campus implementations, this books provides examples, strategies, techniques, and thought exercises to get you going. My biggest take-away from the book is: 1. This is about access for all, not accessibility This book is an essential read for anyone interested in providing more access to more students to the resources a university provides. Scaffolding from small steps we can take as individuals (whether we are faculty, support, or administrators) over awareness-raising strategies to full-unit and campus implementations, this books provides examples, strategies, techniques, and thought exercises to get you going. My biggest take-away from the book is: 1. This is about access for all, not accessibility for some 2. This is about awareness for all, not something that is put on faculty only 3. If we are serious, this is a culture change that will benefit not only all of our students but also everyone, employees, alumni, guests, who interact with your institution. Let's get to work!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Stan Skrabut

    Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a powerful strategy for increasing access and inclusion in the classroom. The classroom can be face-to-face or online. In the book, Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone: Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education , Thomas Tobin and Kirsten Behling shared a way for individual instructors to adopt UDL principles as well as a way to increase adoption across campus. Read more Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a powerful strategy for increasing access and inclusion in the classroom. The classroom can be face-to-face or online. In the book, Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone: Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education , Thomas Tobin and Kirsten Behling shared a way for individual instructors to adopt UDL principles as well as a way to increase adoption across campus. Read more

  4. 5 out of 5

    Monica Goodell

    Let's be honest - this book is only for a very particular audience. It is very informative and helpful for my purposes of what I do at my job, but it is not a fun read. If you want to know how to make your materials more accessible to help avoid lawsuits about accessibility issues, then this book is key to making that happen. It is not, however, a quick fun read. Obviously, since it took me 2 years to finish! Let's be honest - this book is only for a very particular audience. It is very informative and helpful for my purposes of what I do at my job, but it is not a fun read. If you want to know how to make your materials more accessible to help avoid lawsuits about accessibility issues, then this book is key to making that happen. It is not, however, a quick fun read. Obviously, since it took me 2 years to finish!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Writing style was very clear and straight to the point. I like the overview at the end of each chapter and PD activities found within the book. I recommend this book for leaders and admin. in education who want to train their staff in Universal Design for Learning. Although this is written for institutions of higher learning, much of the design is transferrable for secondary education.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    It's not just about accessibility — it's about access. And access to learning that lasts isn't the same for everyone. Tobin and Behling take a practical approach and offer easy to implement strategies. It's not just about accessibility — it's about access. And access to learning that lasts isn't the same for everyone. Tobin and Behling take a practical approach and offer easy to implement strategies.

  7. 5 out of 5

    K8

    Great tips for Universal Design. Who knew they would become sooo important. #quarantine #remoteteaching

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rick Lewis

    Some really great information on UDL to be found here (I especially loved the idea of the "plus one" model). Fairly repetitive. Long stretches not really applicable to my own instructional practice. Some really great information on UDL to be found here (I especially loved the idea of the "plus one" model). Fairly repetitive. Long stretches not really applicable to my own instructional practice.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Katie Harper

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angelina

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erin McCully

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cheriecrosby

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Rogers

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Miller

  18. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  19. 5 out of 5

    B. Lee

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam Nemeroff

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gaby

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mckinzie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pau

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alan Chiu

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