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Casa Moro: The Second Cookbook

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The exotic culinary traditions of southern Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean are passionately presented by two of London’s top restaurateurs. The Moro restaurant was born out of a desire to cook within the wonderful tradition of Mediterranean food, particularly the exotic flavours of Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean. The Moro is one of the most talked-about restaurants i The exotic culinary traditions of southern Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean are passionately presented by two of London’s top restaurateurs. The Moro restaurant was born out of a desire to cook within the wonderful tradition of Mediterranean food, particularly the exotic flavours of Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean. The Moro is one of the most talked-about restaurants in London, winning the Time Out and BBC awards for Best New Restaurant, in 1998. Its spinoff publication, Moro: The Cookbook, went on to be a huge success, with its passionate insight into this little-known culinary tradition. Now, taking the range of flavours beyond those covered in the first book, Casa Moro introduces an impressive quality and diversity of recipes that are fully accessible to the average cook; ranging from Asparagus with parsley and almonds; Moroccan zucchini salad Partridge escabeche; Garlic prawns with white wine and chilli; Chicken with pine nuts, saffron and fino sherry; and Chestnut, almond and chocolate cake. In Casa Moro, Sam and Sam Clark have created fresh and dynamic dishes that reflect their restaurant’s ever-changing menu. Much more than a simple catalogue of recipes, Casa Moro evokes the Clarks’s extensive travels in Spain and Morocco and their house in the heart of Moorish Andalucia, taking the reader on a journey that resonates with delicious dishes, history and tradition.


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The exotic culinary traditions of southern Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean are passionately presented by two of London’s top restaurateurs. The Moro restaurant was born out of a desire to cook within the wonderful tradition of Mediterranean food, particularly the exotic flavours of Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean. The Moro is one of the most talked-about restaurants i The exotic culinary traditions of southern Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean are passionately presented by two of London’s top restaurateurs. The Moro restaurant was born out of a desire to cook within the wonderful tradition of Mediterranean food, particularly the exotic flavours of Spain and the Muslim Mediterranean. The Moro is one of the most talked-about restaurants in London, winning the Time Out and BBC awards for Best New Restaurant, in 1998. Its spinoff publication, Moro: The Cookbook, went on to be a huge success, with its passionate insight into this little-known culinary tradition. Now, taking the range of flavours beyond those covered in the first book, Casa Moro introduces an impressive quality and diversity of recipes that are fully accessible to the average cook; ranging from Asparagus with parsley and almonds; Moroccan zucchini salad Partridge escabeche; Garlic prawns with white wine and chilli; Chicken with pine nuts, saffron and fino sherry; and Chestnut, almond and chocolate cake. In Casa Moro, Sam and Sam Clark have created fresh and dynamic dishes that reflect their restaurant’s ever-changing menu. Much more than a simple catalogue of recipes, Casa Moro evokes the Clarks’s extensive travels in Spain and Morocco and their house in the heart of Moorish Andalucia, taking the reader on a journey that resonates with delicious dishes, history and tradition.

30 review for Casa Moro: The Second Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    I changed my mind completely on this one. Hear me out. Casa Moro is a London restaurant that has been doing very well for over a decade serving food inspired by the Muslim cuisines around the Mediterranean, think Spain, Morocco and Turkey. I love this kind of food, and being a decent cook myself and having lived in both Spain and Morocco for several years, I’m opinionated on the subject. The first chapter is a celebration of the region where the Sams own a house, the Alpujarras, and the seasonal co I changed my mind completely on this one. Hear me out. Casa Moro is a London restaurant that has been doing very well for over a decade serving food inspired by the Muslim cuisines around the Mediterranean, think Spain, Morocco and Turkey. I love this kind of food, and being a decent cook myself and having lived in both Spain and Morocco for several years, I’m opinionated on the subject. The first chapter is a celebration of the region where the Sams own a house, the Alpujarras, and the seasonal cooking they do there. First season up: winter. What is the first dish they cook? A rabbit paella. That is, in my opinion, a strange choice. This is not really a local specialty, and it certainly isn’t a typical winter dish (for one thing, the recipe calls for a fresh tomato). And it is a bloody hard thing to get right, or rather, it is easy to get right once you’ve done it two dozen times or so. And, how is this possible, they don’t mention the soccarat! (That’s the browned stuff on the bottom of the pan that is essential for a great paella, according to cognoscenti.) Sam (or is it Sam?) simply dumps some foil on top when there is still some moisture in the pan, and lets the whole shebang steam to doneness. Sacrilege! But the editor clearly thought it a cool thing for a Sam to do, cooking this dish out in the open, wearing a posh shirt and a spiffy waistcoat, while a cute kid is being cute in the background. (Oh, mean, mean me.) Next chapter: bread. Now I love my bread as much as the next guy. More so, actually: me and my wife once agreed that, if she were ever to be asked in a stupid game show what my favorite food was, she would say “bread”. But let us be honest. Baking your own bread may result in a great Look-What-I’ve-Done-I-Baked-My-Own-Bread feeling, but very, very rarely in a great loaf of bread. Even flatbreads and pizzas are usually disappointing when made in an amateur kitchen. Heston Blumenthal showed you need a heat of at least 400°C (that's 750 °F) to cook them really well, so the best advice would be: don’t try this at home, kids, that’s what restaurants and bakers are for. So, fifty or so pages in, I was ready to dislike this book, heartily. But then I read on. And I found a few interesting recipes. And then many more. And I recognised many of the Spanish classics I used to love and had almost forgotten. And I found the recipes to be extremely well explained. The Sams obviously know and love this kind of food. What is, in the end, the best measure of a cookery book’s value? The number of recipes in it you want to try, in my opinion. So I made a list. Forty seven recipes got onto it. That’s a hell of a lot. So I hang my head in shame. This is one of the better cookery books on my shelf. I’m a wise-ass. Disculpeme, Sam. And Sam.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Danker

    I love this one as well. In fact, I highly recommend all three Moro books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    I'll probably upgrade it when I've cooked some of the recipes. I'll probably upgrade it when I've cooked some of the recipes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rami

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Kirkpatrick

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ivana

  7. 5 out of 5

    Linda Garcia

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jolyon

  9. 4 out of 5

    philippe agnello

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elsa

  11. 5 out of 5

    Siri Hol

  12. 5 out of 5

    Annamária

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janet Meadowcroft

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dharmesh Raithatha

  15. 4 out of 5

    T

  16. 4 out of 5

    MISS S J JONES

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris Loop

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jsagalovsky

  19. 5 out of 5

    Thea Mallett

  20. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  22. 5 out of 5

    Liquidlasagna

  23. 5 out of 5

    lorell webster

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kate Doran

  25. 4 out of 5

    James Davies

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gonzalo

  27. 5 out of 5

    James Howard

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lara

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

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